• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • WE CREATE LONG TERM, MEANINGFUL RELATIONSHIPS IN HERE ... PLEASE JOIN US.

    You know what we all love...

    RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE
    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
The Cranker

Spring Time Fishing In Ottertail County

Recommended Posts

The Cranker

Another spring open water season is upon us and I can’t help but get pumped! What a great time of the year when everyone is excited to get there boat out of storage or a brand new boat all rigged up and ready to go fishing: The Minnesota Twins playing, the ice is thawing and the snow is all melted. There are much longer days, and the start of what I consider the start to my fishing season. Typically, normal ice out, in the middle of April, early season crappie fishing is one of my favorite types of fishing. It is a time to spend some quality time on the water with a fishing buddy or just some time alone. For me catching crappies ranks right up there with walleyes, salmon, trout, and the few weeks before walleye opener can be great for slab crappies and sunfish. It takes some patience, some changing of tactics, bait and staying mobile to find where the fish are, but when you catch one crappie you can bet there are a lot more there. Here is what works for me:

Crappies and Sunfish normally move into the reed beds to spawn when the water temperature reaches around 50 degrees or higher. The lakes and rivers that I spend a lot of time fishing in the spring peaks around 51 degrees. The areas that will receive the most activity early on are on areas of mud on the northern end of the lake. The northern end of the lakes receives the most sun in the spring time, and the dark mud bottom will absorb the sunlight. I like to try to target these mud bottom reed flats right away.

I like to go to the reed lines in the morning or before sundown. I will use my electric trolling motor and be a quite as possible in the reed lines and work different depths, but as sunset gets closer the shallower I will fish. Boat control is the key to any fishing! Try to keep your boat positioned just far enough away from where you locate the fish. Then cast into those reeds or break lines without spooking the fish. If you do this you will increase your opportunities 100%!

I tend to use a slip bobber and a jig tipped with a minnow or a small jig or fly tipped with larva or a grub. I am always in search of what these pan fish are feeding on, at the time. As the water temps increase you will see different forage hatching. That is why it is important to have multiple bait presentations with you at all times.

I mainly use the 1/64 to 1/32 ounce and have found that the best colors seem to be yellow-green-red and white. Of course each lake and river is different with water clarity and the fish may take another color better so I usually have a variety of colors and see what works the best. I feel that it is also a great idea to rig up and have three or four rods with you. The reason is that pike, walleye and bass can hit your jig and take the whole works with them. Nothing is worse than finding and getting into crappies and then having to take time to retie your line because jaws just hit your rig. The other reason is to be able to try a different color of bait presentation without having to re-tie your line every time.

Another key element I use is the wind. When I am searching on where to start fishing I will target the reed line that the waves are going into. There is a pretty good chance that the pan fish will be in these reeds searching for the baitfish and other forage that has blown in there by the wind. One of my favorite situations is where I have had a 15 mph wind all day and it dies to almost nothing in the evening hours. With light tackle I like to go into these areas very quietly. If crappies are in these reeds you will know after a few casts. More than likely they will be there. If there is a lot of wind, I will use my anchor and let my bait drift into the areas that I want to fish. I do this because it will be much easier to manage the boat rather than trying to fight the waves with the trolling motor.

On a dead calm night you’ll want to again use the trolling motor and move just a little bit to find the fish. Again, you want to be quiet because a lot of noise in shallow water can really scare the fish. And always don’t be afraid to go back to places you tried and hour earlier because sometimes pan fish will move in from deeper water and you might have left 10 minutes before they came in these areas.

The pan fish fishing gets better each week in the spring and can stay that way well into May and June as far as fishing in reeds goes. There are other methods that work well such as casting beetle spins but I seem to have better luck in June when it comes to spinners etc. There is something about watching that bobber go down that really gets exciting and fun. There are some nights in the spring when you really can’t get the line out fast enough. So when the ice gets off the lake and get out there and give crappies and sunfish in the reeds a try, it can be a great time. Listen, take your wife/girlfriend and especially a kid out fishing this time of year. There is lots of action and it’s a great way to introduce someone into our greatest past time and that’s fishing! Oh yeah, don’t forget to bring warmer clothes, facemask and gloves with because that ride across the lake early in the spring can be a cold one.

For those fisherman and women who do not know, Ottertail County has some of the best fishing there is in the State of Minnesota. Especially when it comes to panfish. There are some just unbelievable crappie and sun fish lakes near Perham, Minnesota in Ottertail County. Lakes like Big Pine, Little Pine, Lake Lizze, Lake Lidia, Ottertail Lake, Battle Lake, Lake Rose, Long Lake, Pelican Lake, Dead Lake, Star Lake and the list goes on and on. There are 1000 lakes in Ottertail County alone!

And for those who have never been to this area to fish. Even if you do fish these area lakes, I invite you to Perham, Minnesota and stay at the Cactus Resort & RV Park.

Take a tour through the Cactus Resort. See any of the four cabin suites or learn more about a Appeldoorn Park Model RV Cabin. This area has some of this states premier fishing and hunting! To learn more Click Here

Fish On!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lookincalifornia

wow, great info.

as a kid, my granparents used to keep a trailer on rush. buchanan was another favorite as well as the smaller lakes, donnell and head. lots of great panfishing up there cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ufatz

You gotta be kidding! Who has time to fish in Ottertax County. I'm too busy selling my blood, scrounging aluminum cans and a little petty theft, all to raise money for my property taxes, to do anything as frivolous as fishing!! But YES, you Out Of County folks, PLEASE come and bring bags of money to help feed the beast!! Anything to help lift our burden! grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

Announcements



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • mrpike1973
      Lake Sylvia is great for bass also lake Francis near Kimball is good too a little smaller but great action! The Mississippi sounds fun I should try it myself.
    • delcecchi
      My beach be west for sure.  
    • leech~~
      Update.  Minnesota American Legion and other volunteers succeeded Thursday, May 17, 2018, in cutting the giant North Long Lake bog into three sections. The bog came to rest on the beach of an American Legion camp. The plan is to move the middle section to open up the beach, then relocate the other two back to the bog’s original position on the lake north of Brainerd, Minn. (Forum News Service)
    • leech~~
      This Freak?   Jam Ferg poses with his fish after TWRA officials certified its weight.
    • guideman
      The Minnesota record is almost that big, it's over 5lbs and it was caught in the Vermillion river in southern Minnesota back in the late 50's I believe.   "Ace"  
    • guideman
      You need to go west or perhaps north of Pine island if you don't want to go that far.   "Ace"   "It's just fishing man"  
    • Getanet
      I spoke to a buddy who was at Sag over the weekend, and my dad who was fishing a lake a bit north of Leech - none of them had much luck on walleye. I'm chalking it up to a walleye blackout across the northern part of the state. I just need an excuse for the rest of the trips I take! We're talking about coming up again in the fall. I definitely would like to come back for a longer trip, there is so much more of the lake to explore  
    • Borch
      It usually pays off finding your own fish.   Nice report.
    • Borch
      Welcome to the forum.  Lots of good options already given.  Have some fun!
    • ozzie
      The fish are out there and they go hot and cold on the bite but they are catchable!  Anytime you can get the kids out fishing is worth it in my opinion!  Take them up and wet a line is about the only way you will find out if they can catch anything or not.  The main thing to look for before going to Red is the week leading up to the date you plan on fishing is to watch the wind speed and direction.  If blowing from the west for a few days the water stirs up and gets hard to fish.