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hookset

moving to ponsford?

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hookset

Although it was not on forbes top 1,000,000. places to live, I am thinking about building a home in ponsford. Any body know this area, or only is reputation? looking for the truth or positive affirmation on my decision.

Not only on the hunting and fishing but quality of life in the area.

thanks for the help.

joe

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hattrk4me

You can find better places to build....

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Jim Uran

I'll second that, pretty much open not much around. I work For White Earth Housing and I do a lot of work in the neighboring village, A lot of punks walking around like gangsters and crap like that. There really isn't too much around.

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hookset

I know you can... but i own 150 acre farm there, and my daughter is taking gun safty, she is a real good shot(lots of loose dogs running around)

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Paul

I guess to me it would depend on exactally were you want to build. I have clients with multi million doller homes and ponsford adress but not near ponsford. They live on a very good fishing lake, with a diverse fish species poluation. Good deer hunting in the area as well. Good Luck with your decision.

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eyehunter

I don't think that was an appropriate response to hattrik4me. In case you haven't seen his other post on this forum, two of his labs were just shot and killed and dumped in a ditch by some low life that has nothing better to do than cause trouble. I guess what I am trying to say is that I don't think that I would go around boasting about something like that. There is at least one member of this forum (and a not too distant neighbor to the Ponsford area) that will be without his two best friends from now on because of what you just explained. Maybe before you go shooting domestic dogs you should make (Contact Us Please) sure that they don't belong to someone. Or, if they're not bothering you....just leave them alone and let them go back home. mad.gif

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cliffy

.

Quote:

(lots of loose dogs running around)


man...if that was suppose to be funny response to hattrk4me’s comment....you are way off base. I will give you the benefit of the doubt and say you didn’t realize his situation. If you got the land, go ahead and build...might as well enjoy it.

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vitalshot5

eyehunter, before you make your own accusations maybe you should ask him what he meant by it......there are a lot of roamer dogs around there....they cause problems with the neighbors and the neighbors don't take responsibility for them....and law enforcement don't want to hear aboutit....leaves very few options....sometimes nusiuant dogs need to be disposed of. that in no way is a cut down to hattrk4me if his dogs weren't nusiant roamers.....don't jump to conclussions!!!!

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hookset

sorry if I was insensitive I have also lost a beloved family dog to a trigger happy neighbor. I am not talking about cared for pets. we do have a problem with feral dogs(or just neglected). Almost every time I have hunted my land, I have had a dog walk by or have seen one on my property. I get them on my trail cameras all the time.

Again, sorry if my comments were taken wrong

joe

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DEADhead

ok all, let's keep this thread on track. thanks.

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fisherdog19

I guess where to build would be a question only you can answer. Some info to find out would be: is it in a good school district, is it safe, is it a crime free community, will you have trouble selling if you ever need to. Just some things to think about. There's no doubt that it is a great area for fishing and hunting.

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iffwalleyes

Ponsford is not exactly a great setting for family rasing in my opinion. I hunt deer out there every year but it is not a place I would want to live. You have much better option with DL and Park Rapids being near by. You would still be able to go up and hunt as it is only about 30 Miles from DL and Park Rapids. You will have to go to one of these for grocerys and hardware type stuff because there is none of that in Ponsford. As mention by fisherdog you build the house and decided 5 years down the line you want to sell you are going to have a difficult time selling it.

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hadanooner

yeah ponsford no, surrounding lakes yes. We have a lake home on bad medicine and it uses the ponsford as the adress. Nooner

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iffy

Yep; The lakes are fabulous. Bad Medicine is one of the nicest in the state. I'd say the hunting around the area is as good or better than anywhere in the state. Just go into Two Inlets and watch the bucks that get registered every year. But as far as being back in the woods or on a farm, unless you live there year around, don't even consider building anything of value on your property. It may not be there next time you come up. shocked.gif

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gorrilla

Nothing against White Earth Reservation as a whole, I am friends with several people there, but even they will tell you many of the areas social and economic problems occur in the Pinepoint community next door to Ponsford. I'm not speaking about everyone in the entire community, I'm sure there are some very nice people there too. I just want you to know about the issues there if you plan to live next to it. It was told to me by a utility worker that they found over ten stolen cars in one year parked on the sewer lagoon land recently. There is an incredible amount of graffiti and vandalism as well throughout the community, just look at the public buildings.

As far as loose dogs go, my first visit to the community several years ago, my truck was chased down the street by four barking dog (one nursing pitbull female, one shepard, and two large mutts). If you've never been near some communities like this much, then you don't know the meaning of strays, and most of the locals obviously don't know the meaning of a kennel or leash.

This isn't a slam on race and don't take it like that, its just and observation of very local social and crime issues and a semi educated opinion on the neighboring community.

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