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Timber wolve sightings


dadman

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Just wondering how many sightings during deer season!

Four sightings during day, week before rifle season while bowhunting (bleat call works wonders). More Timber puppies than deer. Can't wait for lottery drawing for Wolf tags.

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Didn't see any but came across plenty of hair filled piles of poo. One in our party saw a timber chase a fawn during the youth hunt up north.

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I heard quite a few of them during the archery hunt near Cook MN. Pups and adults. Freaked me out when I was hunting out of a blind on the ground and I could hear the pups whining they were so close. But I never saw one.

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True story.

The old guy walks into the garage, opens up the refrigerator and pulls out a can of pop, and leans up against the workbench.

One of the guys says "Hey Frank - see any deer this morning?"

Frank (not his real name) was a secretive and sometimes crusty old guy, so we all hold our breaths wondering if he's going to chew the guy out for asking a question or give us a good story. With some of Frank's stories it was worth it to get chewed out from time to time!

Frank looks us over, squints at the guy, and says

"$%#&*$% wolves are hanging around and they're %$#&^ me up!"

Someone asks "so how many are there - did you see them?"

"Well" says Frank - glaring around - "just this morning 3 of the rotten &^%*$ come right up to me - they weren't scared or nothing - coulda clubbed 'em they were so close."

"Whatja do?"

"Well I fired a warning shot over the leader's head and the other two ran away."

Frank tosses the empty can into the garbage, walks out the door, and about that time everyone realized what he had said. Pop and coffee came out more than one nostril!

[ To this day no one really knows if "Frank" was pulling our legs or not - some his stories were real whoppers.]

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My party saw three on opening weekend West of Cook, MN. I had a really nice one come walking by my stand Sat. morning. It came within 20 yards. A really nice specimen with a lot of white mixed in with the normal gray/black that we normally see. Seeing wolves while hunting is normally a bad sign as the deer will tend to leave the area when the wolves move through, however in this case, less than five minutes later I had three does come down the same trail. We are seeing significantly greater numbers of wolves around our area now then we did in the 80's or 90's. Once in the late 80's my father and I were pulling a load of pulpwood out of the woods on a dray when a nice sized wolf came out on the trail and proceeded to walk in front of the tractor for a 1/4 mile like we weren’t even there. They don't seem to show much fear which is a little discomforting.

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I heard from someone who told me that there was a biologic field and the owners had counted about 165 deer in there one night and then the wolves moved in and only saw 5 deer during deer season and they have killed 11 of the 13 wolves theyve seen. Including the neighbors in the wolve killings.

So yeah I think there should or will be a Wolf season soon. Last weekend we had the rain on sat night and I didnt go out on sun morning but went out for the evening hunt up north and boy there were fresh wolf tracks (2 sides of the gravel road and going the same direction, assuming 2 different wolves traveling together, and some big buck tracks)

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One spotted around Ulen following a mom and daughter walking through the woods. The Mom and daughter came out and one of the hunters fired a warning shot an it ran away. I also heard of a story where a wolve attacked a persons dog while out grouse hunting and it stated that is was illegal for the hunter to fire because a dog is considered family. I am just going to say this, if a wolf ever attacked my dog while out hunting, my dog is considered a part of my family and i will defend my dog.

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I was curious about how to deal with a wolf encounter so I asked the DNR.

Here is what I asked:

I was reading a Star Tribune article about a Grouse hunter that defended himself and his Brittany Spaniel from a pack of wolves. I am under the impression that you can only defend yourself or another person since wolves are protected. Am I mistaken?

There has been a lot of discussion between the guys I hunt with about what effect the wolf has on wildlife populations. I personally think the wolf should be in Minnesota. I am just curious how one can and should deal with an encounter with one.

DNR's Response:

You are technically correct; current Federal law allows a person to take a gray wolf only in defense of a person's life; it does not authorize taking to protect domestic animals. However, when a person is accompanied by a dog, and wolves attack the dog, determination of any concurrent threat to the person is subject to interpretation on a case by case basis.

Minnesota laws are more permissive; they allow a person to take a wolf that poses an immediate threat to a domestic animal. However, state laws are currently superseded by Federal regulations, and will not be in effect until the gray wolf is removed from the protection of the federal Endangered Species Act of 1973.

This is the information I will be using if I ever have an encounter with a wolf. I do also know that if Maggie (black lab) is with me and she was attacked, the wolf's only chance is if I miss.

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I know what I'd do if that Wolf/Dog situation came up... no second thoughts... a warning shot and set the sights = Crow food. Question: I'm no Wolf expert but I hunt in the Itasca State Park area and I've heard guys call wolves "Brush Wolves" in that area, saying that there aren't many "Timberwolves" in that area.... I didn't know there was a difference, if there truly is.

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I was grouse hunting near the town of Squaw Lake just north of Winnie a couple years ago when two timberwolves came over a ridge, stared at me and my dog and then proceeded to make a run for my dog after I yelled to try to scare them away. I pulled up and shot one in the head at 20 yards. It amazingly didn't appear to harm it though and they simply both turned and ran without making a sound.

I called the DNR both at the state and in the Blackduck office to tell them about the incident as I thought they may want to know of the aggressive wolf behavior. They didn't voice any concern at all when I said I shot the wolf while it was attacking my dog. They simply told me they are hearing of such cases more and more often, especially in NE Minnesota.

I think the problem with the case you read about in the paper is the publicity it recieved. Of course the DNR has to make an appearance that they enforce the law to the letter or complete lawlessness would take over. We all know that for every rule or law, there will always be a unique situation that makes it difficult to enforce. Only tree hugging zeolots would argue that someone shouldn't shoot a wolf if it attacks your dog. Even the DNR knows that but when things go very public, it puts them in a bind.

Much like the state record bass fiasco after it became public he transported it alive. They really didn't care (IMHO), they just had to appear to care since it became such a public spectacle. It was such a rare case and they probably would have enjoyed seeing the fish live as much as you and I would have.

ccarlson

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I have seen and heard wolves howling every time I have been out bowhunting this fall just north of the Crosslake area...there seems to be quite a few of them around. Last fall, while working on field dressing a doe I shot, one came walking down the trail, then stopped about 75 yards away and just watched me finish dressing the deer. Kind of spooky...threw the deer in the truck and got out of there!

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Up North where I live coyotes are also refered to as "brush wolves". If you have ever been able to compare the two side-by-side you would easily be able to see that real Timbers are much larger than coyotes!

We also have had slow deer hunting in our area because a local pack of Timbers was hunting there during the opener. mad.gif This usually happens at least 1 week during our season every year.

Cliff

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maybe one of the computer savy people on this site could post a picture of a timberwolf and a coyote(brushwolf)side by side so people would know the difference. Just a thought! I would but I am not computer savy!!!!!! tongue.gif

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if a timberwolf came close to my dog and threated it, the first thing I'd do is shoot at it, I dont care if its illegal or legal, my dog is family and cherish it as much as you guys cherish your dogs or pets..

Ozzie- You can look on the internet and see the difference by Timberwolf and Coyotes.

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I have a good friend out west that has a horse ranch in Montana. He has pictures of Grizzly bears within 20 feet of his sliding glass door. He asked about protecting his animals...Feds basically said let the critter eat you horses if it wants. If you harm one hair on that animals head you will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law! He ran across another old rancher in the same area and asked him what he should do to keep the bears away. He said,"when you see one use the three S's(shoot, shovel, shut up!) Now I'm relaying this in second hand so some of the finer points have probably been lost. Bottom line is that if your dealing with an immenent threat to yourself or a family member you can do what it takes to defend yourself, however, a dog, well that might get you in a whole hornets nest of trouble. Hopefully the CO in the area would see it the same way you did.

Tunrevir~

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I've seen plenty of them up north near sand stones while bow hunting. One came about 20 yards and I pulled out my knife just in case it came any closer. It looked at me for about a minute and went off the other way. If I was hunting with my dog and it attack my dog, it better be bullet proof. They should open a season to hunt these timberwolves, I can't wait.

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A buddy saw 6 come into my gut pile and my brother saw 2 while hunting in Holyoke. Another brother heard a pack on our property cleaning up some scraps. Deer hunting has been good for us so far. Wolves have been there for awile.

I will probably get some heat for this but here we go. While I will agree that we need to open a season on wolves, the dog owners need to realize when wolves see a dog in there area they will defend that area just like a buck will when it comes to does. It is a chance you take when you bring your dog out there. Peace

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Quote:

I will probably get some heat for this but here we go. While I will agree that we need to open a season on wolves, the dog owners need to realize when wolves see a dog in there area they will defend that area just like a buck will when it comes to does. It is a chance you take when you bring your dog out there. Peace


No heat from me, I agree with what you said... It would just be one unlucky Wolf thats all.

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I'm absolutely amazed at the number of people that have had these encounters w/wolves. I know a trapper that has been trapping wolves in Alaska for over 30 years and has only come across one wolf in the wild. He's trapped over 100's of them and puts on more miles that the average guy (mostly on foot and in prime wolf territory).

No doubt the "shut up and shovel" concept is in place out west. We WILL have a wolf management plan in the lower 48 before long and MN will likely be one of the first states to have it. My guess is that it will be w/in the next 5 years. There better be a management plan because there is not predator on the face of earth that is more effective than the wolf. Wolves are not bad animals, but they are so tenacious that they make us, as hunters, look silly in terms of harvest. If they're left unchecked and the packs get near carrying capacity, you'll see a marked decrease in your resource and it will be in a very short time. And, it will take a long time for your resource to make it's way back.

As stated earlier, brush wolf is just another name for a coyote. And just as coyotes are in an area, you don't see many fox. Same goes for wolves and coyotes. The hierarchy of predators is well in place. Again, I'm absolutely amazed by the encounters some have had w/wolves because they are so elusive and arguably the smartest predator.

I've seen Mexican grey wolves but never a Grey wolf. What a site that would be.

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Timberwolf was hit and killed by a car just north of the Arrowhead Rd/Rice Lake Rd intersection, within the city limits of Duluth, two years ago.

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Right now our deer population as whole isn't in immediate danger from being hurt by wolves, BUT there is no doubt that they can and will have effect in more localized areas. If they take up residence in a smaller area they can do a good deal of damage. Now I know somebody will come in here and say their range is 100 sq miles and taking some number of deer won't hurt, but it's been my experience that they don't leave an area if there is sufficient game around. I think you can also see big difference in how jumpy deer are in wolf country. I've hunted both and deer seem to be much, much more edgy if there are timbers around.

Wolves are the most efficient predator on the continent. In areas in BC and Alaska where certain game populations are struggling, wolves can really beat up on those limited populations and hurt their recovery. Wolf management needs to be done when wolves are above their original management goals. In states where there is a larger population of people in wolf country, wolf encounters will occur if we don't keep the population in check. We just can't take the stand like a lot of the "warm and fuzzy" crowd take and think that every wolf needs to be saved. If we don't want to save them then we don't care about the environment. Wolves aren't in danger, they just have a smaller population in the lower US.

Neiko,

I agree we all take risks when we have our dogs out and that it is typical canine behavior in wolves. I just want the right to protect my dog and not be worried about getting tagged for huge amount if I do. I know that if a Lobo attacks my dog he better be able to out run whatever weapon I've got in my hand.

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I hunt in Itasca State Park and it seems that every year we are seeing more and hearing more wolves. This year one guy in are party saw a pack of timberwolves chasing a doe and her two fawns. I don't how it turned out but i can bet that those wolves ate good that night. I think they have had a substatial impact on deer populations in our area or they just spook them out.

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Itasca State Park ya say, have you eaten at the Headwaters Cafe? If so, read the story of the wolf on the menu. I hunt in Alida, about fifteen minutes north of the North entrance.

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Didn't see any first hand, but we heard a ton of them howling one night this fall in the BWCA. Really a creepy sound when you are camping out there with them

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First year I was bear hunting I was trying all kinds of ways to bring bears in. One article I read was to use the ol' predator call and call them in. After about a half hour or so I heard some noise from straight ahead. Here comes the lead wolf with another close behind. They both go right underneath my stand and one circles around to the right and the other circles around to my left. Then here come three more all in a row, slowly picking their way through the woods toward the two "standers." It was very cool to watch, but it was a VERY quick walk back to the truck after they cleared out!

I saw one other one while bear hunting two years ago near Crane Lake close to Voyaguers Nat'l Park. It was early morning and you know how it is when you're on the stand and you get that "I'm being watched" feeling? I looked to the left and he was just standing there watching me through the thick brush.

Haven't seen any this year but we have a few tracks and scat around.

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My family owns land north of two harbors about 50 miles - if you have heard of Fairbanks or Basset Township -

There is no other private land around us (landlocked) from Superior Nat'l Forest. The wolves have taken over up there. Every two to three years a pack will den about 25 yards from a tree stand of mine. Its a nice sight, but when I see them the stand is a bust. Over the past 6-7 years there have been about 30-40 distinct pups come out of that den alone.

The land has never really held alot of deer, but in the last 10 years there have only been maybe 3-5 deer taken by an average of 8 guys. We do see many many wolf tracks; last year I saw one that was over half my hand size.

We have noticed a reduction in the amount of moose calves. The population was increasing in the previous years, but lately the number has decreased - saw one this year.

Maybe someone will know the answer to this.... I noticed a mountain lion this year - in fact, I saw two. (one was close to complete darkness about 20 yards away lite up with a flashlight) This was the first time anyone in our party have seen these animals. Locals have said that they are around, but the DNR has not said anything about them. When I told them about it they asked if it could have been a lynx or...

How will the competition between the two effect game animals? It used to be common for me to see 15 or so Moose on a trip, now lucky to see 3-5. (I did see one that was a monster - 9 points on one side). Should we practice the 3 S's; kidding, but in our area there should be a management hunt. There are tooooo many wolves for the area.

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