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Ruegs23

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Ruegs23

I will be heading up to mille lacs next sat for my very first time. The way it sounds you have to fish the flats? Does anyone have gps coordinates of the flats? I really have no idea where to go up there. I have a gps and vexilar and an auger full of gas. Any info would be awesome. I would be coming to the southwest side but am willing to drive anywhere. Thanks in advance!
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Ruegs23

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Crow Hunter

When you get to the lake, stop in a bait shop on the lake. Buy your bait there, also buy a "Walleye Whiffer" map of Mille Lacs lake. The map will have gps coordinates of many spots on the lake. Open the map up and ask the guys in the bait shop to give you an idea of where to start. Then access the lake through a resort. Ask the resort people for fishing info as well as info on the ice conditions that day. There are a lot of posts in these forums that have info on jigging spoons/ methods of fishing for perch and walleyes. Good luck.

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Guest

The easiest way to fish the flats right now
is the north end. I accessed the lake this
weekend at Red Door Resort in Wealthwood.Fee
is 7 dollars and nice folks to boot.The ice
is 20-24inches and driving is no problem,very
smooth.I was on Resort Flat in 30 ft.,right on the edge of the flat.Did better on fri afternoon than sat aft.Nortland rattlespoon-
plain silver tipped with whole rainbow minnow.Tutts map and a gps help a lot to get
away from crowds!

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Ken in Nisswa:

Interesting comment about Friday being better than Saturday. So many variables I'm not sure it is even related but I was on the SE end on rocks in 10.5 feet. Friday from 3Pm till 5AM my son and I got three walleyes, 15 perch and of course 7 eel pout. From Saturday noon till Sunday 8 AM had only a few bites. Granted we were in a perm house the whole time. I couldn't see any change in the weather - my only thought was that I was only 200 yards away from the snowmobile racing and Otter Classic fishing tourney headquarters at Mac's Twin Bay. I thought that was far enough away - but maybe it did affect the bite. Anyone care to share some thoughts or comparisons of Friday and Saturday???

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Ruegs23

CrowHunter abd Ken In Nisswa
Thanks for the info. I'll have see what the resort people have to say. What are the chances of catching good walleyes in shallow water now? My girlfriend had an uncle who has a cabin on the west side and he has a house out in 8 ft of water. I would assume the walleyes have moved out by now but maybe on mille lacs they stick around longer?? I might just give it a try near his house and see what happens. Thanks for the info!!
Ruegs23

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Grabs

I wouldn't really bother with that shallow spot. Especially during the day time. You might get a couple during a really late quiet night, but I wouldn't count on it. Get deeper 22'-26', find a transition area, rocks to gravel, gravel to muc, etc. And get away from the crowds. I saw so many fish spook on the camera when a truck drove even close, or when the ice would crack even a bit and I was fishing in 25' of water. So go deeper, be quiet and then hang on for the ride because it can be long and it can be a blast!

Good Luck!

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Guest

I was fishing the whole weekend and did good the whole time. I caught 29 walleyes friday night/saturday morning and then 24 walleyes on saturday night/sunday morning in 28 feet. Don't know if you'd call that a change or not. It was great fishing. Caught more big fish Saturday night than friday. Also about the noise. I don't know what it is but I often catch a fish when someone pulls up to my house or even drives by. Don't make sense but it seems to happen a lot. Goodluck fishing!!

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Eastsider:

Wow- what a nice couple of days on the eyes. So is this even in the comfort of a perm fishhouse? Must be unreal to bag 20 - 30 walleyes a day in your house - or maybe I just don't have the right expectations (or skill, location and many other facets probably). So are most on whole minnows and plain hook, are you jigging much during prime time? Thanks for the info & report.

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Seabass77

East Sider,
Where where you fishing?? Gravel, Flats, Reefs? How deep and what where you using??

Any help is appreciated.

Joe

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Guest

Hey guys. I was fishing deep gravel off of the main reefs away from the crowd of portables. Yes this was in my permanent house but I tend to move a lot and stay away from the crowds. The depth was about 28'-30' right where the gravel/rocks begins to turn into silty sand. I caught the most fish on a glow in the dark jig a foot and a half off the bottom but the bigger fish came on a plain hook and bead 10 inches off the bottom. I used mostly fatheads but also had a few rainbows and shiners which ran out very quickly. I only got a few jigging but whenever i graphed a fish a rattle wheel went off within a minute or two. The best runs of eyes that I had were from 4-7 p.m., 12-2 a.m. and from 7-9 a.m. The key to catching numbers of fish is to stay away from the crowd on the edges of reefs and transitions. It could take a while to find a transition zone but when you find one it is well worth it!! Good luck fishing!!

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Guest

Hey Eastsider! How are you finding these transitions? Underwater cam? Vexilar? This is my first year with a Vexilar[fl18] and
I dont have a camera.

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Guest

Ken: Start by trying to find the last breakline off the reef that goes into the main lake basin. This is a good start. This break can be as little as a foot or two. I do have a camera so it makes it easier but you can also get very close with a vexilar by detecting how hard the bottom is. I've also used a pinger(A chunk of lead or steel on a rope) to feel the bottom. This will let you know exactly what is down there. Just drill a few holes in a line once you find an area, then go down the line and find out when the bottom changes. It can take a while to find it but these areas usually produce a lot of fish. Hope this helps. Good luck!

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