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Anchoring


Amandafish

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I need some help here, everytime me and my fiance anchor the boat it is a argument. We have a 79 Galaxy that is heavy and with any wind we can not keep the boat still. We use 2 anchors not sure of the weight but I would guess 25-30 pounds each which I think should be enough. We have tried using both anchors in the front,one in front one in back, same side and oppisite sides. The arguing starts as soon as the boat starts swaying, moving etc. as we play the blame game, I think he leaves to much slack on the anchor rope and he thinks I do not have enough slack, I think a few feet should be enough and he thinks you need like 10 feet, in which all that slack alone will alow the boat to move (right)??? Any oppions or advice? Thanks, Amanda

[This message has been edited by Amandafish (edited 06-09-2004).]

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Sounds like you may need a heavier anchor. In my experience, the more rope you have out, the better the chance of staying put...

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Anchoring most boats isn't about the weight of the boat so much as the angle of the anchor and rope length.

I use 100ft. of rope on the bow of my 1800ProV and I plan to use at least 50ft. of it or more when anchoring.

I use a water spike, toss it way up-wind of my desired stop point and I drag it until I feel it catch nice and solid, then I simply allow the boat to drift down-wind unitl I'm about 30ft. from my desired stop point.

At this point I know I've got a firm anchoring by allowing the boat weight to pull tight on the anchor line--if it comes loose, I start over, which is rarely necessary.

Then I get the transom rope out and anchor the rear--this will reduce your sway, but not eliminate it!

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Chells

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I would have to agree with Lindy.

If that don't work Maybe a different style anchor will work (something other than "Mushroom style").

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chells technique is what I use. I would try it.

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Try putting 6 feet of 3/8 inch link chain between the anchor and the rope. Oftentimes it is the lifting of the boat in waves that "hops" the anchor loose. The chain adds some wieght to the line and helps keep the anchor "anchored" by eliminating the hop. Works great on larger boats.

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Plastics...making better fishermen without bait! Good Fishing Guys! CrappieTom

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I'm with "chells" I have the same anchor and ALL the rope 50+.

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Greg

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I carry 100 feet of rope on my digger anchor. A rule of thumb on rope to let out is at least 3 times the depth you are fishing at.

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kslipsinker hit it right on the nose. your depth x 3 is the amount of rope to let out. so says my navy blue jackets manuel.

SPUD

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Thank you, I will try Chells way of doing it. We do have the hooking type anchors but they are so thick they do not hook into the bottom very well. Amanda

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I ashamed to admit I once did not know how to use my anchor, til the day after I bought a second one, which I've never used, and probably never will, slack is the key.

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Hook eight foot of chain to a navy anchor. Connect the chain to a mushroom anchor and then connect the anchor rope to the mushroom anchor.
This should hold in most conditions and eliminate dragging anchor.

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The general rule of thumb is a minimum of three feet of rope for one foot of depth. So... in 20 feet of water, you want AT LEAST 60 feet of rope. Style of anchor matters here too. River/rock anchors need less rope than grab anchors.
Good luck!

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Scoot

RodsbyEngel: custom made fishing rods

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Amanda,
The anchor I have and I think "chells" has is only about an 1/8" thick or so.With a D-ring hooked around square rod.This lets you hook into the rocks real good and tite.Then when your done fishing,you drive the boat forward to slide the D-ring back up the square rod to release it from the rocks/mud.

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Greg

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If you have out enough anchor rope, the boat will swing back and forth.

The more rope let out, the better the hold. But you are not going to stay in one exact spot, especially with wind.

I use a 22 pound "river" style anchor if the wind isn't too bad, and let out rope depending on how windy it is. If there is minimal wind, I will only give a few feet of slack. If there is alot of wind, I'll anchor further up then I would in calm conditions, and let out rope until the rope is at about a 45 degree angle.

I have another anchor, a digger, that weighs 40 pounds.

This puppy hasn't let loose once on me, and I only use it in steep breakline conditions or extreme windy/wavy conitions.

But he is correct: You need to let out more rope.

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Good fishing,
UJ
[email protected]

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united, You said if you have out enough anchor rope, the boat will swing back and forth. I am getting a little confused! So lets say we are at Millelacs and we are fishing 15 feet of water, I would drop the front anchor into the wind let it hook in the bottom with 45 feet of rope out, and then drop the back anchor with a few feet so it does not come up when the boat bounces? And it sounds like I was wrong about the amount of rope, the only bad part is I have to admit it to my fiance <vbg> Amanda

[This message has been edited by Amandafish (edited 06-10-2004).]

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Try turning your motor to the right or left to create a drag balance against the wind. That'll generally keep you in a consistent position.

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Amanda:

The boat will swing like a pendulum if you only use one anchor, regardless of the hold the anchor has.

If you use two anchors effectivley, depending on the location of the tie off of the rope and angle the boat sits to the wind, it is possible to anchor steady with minimal sway.

However, with the wind so variable in speed, your boat is always going to drift around some due to the difference in pressure being applied to the rope via the varied wind speeds.

Now that I have turned anchoring into some sort of science, I will say this....

Good luck fishing and with all your future anchoring endeavors! smile.gif

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Good fishing,
UJ
[email protected]

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Amanda: Jigsticker is right, the more rope(rode) the better, it is also important to keep in mind how much freeboard or distance from the water to your connection point on your boat is, a 3:1 rope to depth ratio will probably only work in extremely calm conditions, the rule of thumb is a minimum of 5:1 and up to 10:1 or more depending on wind, bottom conditions and waves. I use a Guardian G7 anchor which weighs about 4 pounds with 6' feet of chain and up to 200' feet of line, I generally try to use a 7:1 ratio to anchor my 21' fiberglass runabout while fishing on Lake of the Woods, I very rarely cannot make a good hook.

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