Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

Very Nice Walleye Caught by FM Pro Staff


Recommended Posts

  • 'we have more fun' FishingMN Creators

A 13Lb 12oz walleye was caught by canitbeluck.

Congrats Mark!!!
Here's the pic:
markhoffman13Lb-12ozwalleye.jpg

It's likely that Mark will fill us in on his succesful tactics here in the next few days when he gets off the river smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congrats Mark!
Awesome pig walleye!
I sure like your pics,and keep em coming!

CM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mark, congrats on the huge walleye!

------------------
"Study to be quiet"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice!! I'm starting to think you have them trained.

------------------
I'd rather be skunked than follow the crowd!

Brian Rogers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

nice fish! if i were to tie into a fish like that, i would mount her in the boat, then toss her back to catch again. or would that fall under one of the beastiality laws! just kidding, great fish!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rick,
You were half right in saying that I was on the river all weekend. I spent a little time on a lake as well. smile.gif
Thanks folks!
I appreciate the congratulatory comments from all of you. Even "Smelly Pit's" comment. I seriously didn't know what a mullet was, other than the ones I used to catch cast netting in Florida. I had to ask someone. I never realized I had one on my head. smile.gif That explains why I seem to smell fish all the time. I thought the smell was permiated into my hands from handling them! BTW, I love the name "Smelly Pit", pretty "descriptive" to say the least! (PS: There are hygenic products on the market that may help in the reduction of offensive body odors, or you can do what I do when burying smelly fish entrails, take a shovel and dig a hole in the backyard, and....... grin.gif)
Anyways, thanks again!
A little info on the walleye pictured. The walleye is 32 1/2"s, 13lbs 12 oz. My largest walleye caught to date from WI. waters.
Caught on March 26, 2004 on the Fox River in Depere, WI.. Depere is a world class fishery. People from around the world come to experience the spring run of walleye that make their way to Depere via the Fox River from Lake Michigan. This year has been a banner year in terms of quality and quanity of fish. I personally experienced "200 fish days" on the river this year. Most fish run an average of 16-22 inches. Most all spawning year classes of fish are caught here. These fish are migratory fish from the lake so almost all fish are of an adult age. Walleyes that weigh in the middle teens as far as poundage goes are caught each year. I've watched DNR personel as they checked fyke nets, my eyes almost popped out of my head! Lake Michigan, as well as the other Great Lakes provide all the elements required to sustain a healthy population of LARGE fish. Unlike many inland lakes, the open water methods can be a little "different" when fishing open water walleye. However, spring river fishing is pretty much the same wherever you go. Anybody that fishes river walleye will be able to have a chance at landing some "wall hanger" walleyes in Depere.
On that particular day we were fishing a couple hundred yards from the dam. A large gravel/sand 2-4' flat adjacent to a deep 18-20' river channel. The drop was quick, I anchored about a cast's length from the channel. The depth and bottom was of ideal composite for spawning fish. Add in deep water real close by, time of year, water temp, current....Well, the spot just made sense! 3 guys in the boat, each fishing 2 lines. One line was "still fished" using a slip sinker, swivel, hook, and minnow. A short cast(prevents line tangling and keeps them tight to the boat) of 10' or so downstream, then set the pole in the holder and wait...But not for long! The other pole was fished actively using a jig and minnow. Jigs fished either plain or with a small twister tail added to give the bait a larger profile and to also slow down the drop in the shallow water. The bite was fast, at times 2 poles were 1 pole too many. After catching "average" size fish all day with a few decent ones around 25 or so inches thrown in, I decide "horse around" a bit. If you've ever hung around me you'd know that I, like Fishing Minnesota....Like to HAVE MORE FUN!!! I became "bored" at the consistancy of the good fishing, as well as the "cramped" environment that can be had in Depere. So what do I do? I grab one of my ice fishing jig poles that I had in my boat. My friends asked me what the heck I was doing with the jig pole, I told them I had no room in the boat because all the extra things they always happen to pack along.....Like beer, 6 pairs of clothes, and thier overweight bodies! The only thing they never bring is ANYTHING fishing related. Thus my use of the jig pole. smile.gif Anyways, I'm thinking I'll have a little fun with the jig pole. I actually got the idea from FM, Rick to be exact. He's seen on a Fish Fever clip outfishing Pete, Dave, and Ray I think. Being that I was in shallow water and fishing close to the boat, my thinking was that I didn't need a long rod for casting or hook sets, and it would be a blast catching a mess of average size walleye with it. Besides that, after I told my friends I was "forced" to use "sub-standard" equipment because of boat space, or I should say lack of boat space, I noticed them grumbling as they discreetly organized all thier worldly possessions that they had laying around the boat. smile.gif Spooled with 4# test mono, 1/2oz slip sinker, barrel swivel, 2' leader, hook, and a fathead minnow, the bait was tossed behind the boat then set in a rod holder. It was about 1/2 hour before sunset when I started using the jig pole. Because I was only using the boat's anchor light for lighting, the short rod kept it closer to the boat makeing the rod's tip more visible. I caught several fish on the jig pole prior to the big one. Talk about fun! It was a blast fighting 2-4# walleye on that thing! And the looks I got from others......Priceless. The only difficulty I had was in setting the hook. Without a longer rod, I would have to reel like crazy! It was dark, about 7pm when I set the hook on the big walleye. At first it felt like a snag, but it didn't take long to realize that I either had a huge walleye on or maybe a big carp or sheephead that also frequent those waters. I actually thought it was a carp, at times I was almost to the point of horseing her in. A slow, deep, steady, heavy fight for the most. There were a couple of "close calls" when the fish was under and on the opposite side of the boat. Without a long rod to extend out and around my boat motor, all I could do is stick the tip in the water and hope the line didn't break makeing contact with the bottom of the boat when it decided to swim underneath to the other side. My biggest fear was that the fish would get tangled around the anchor rope, it came real close a couple times but luckily for me it didn't. The total fight time was about 4-5 minutes. My buddy who was half-heartidly manning the net kept saying, "It's not a walleye, it's a carp". Even after netting the fish he still couldn't believe it was a walleye. He kept babbling something about, "I never seen nothing like that in all my life! That can't be a walleye!" Prior to him netting the fish I seen the tell tale "glowing eyes" that walleye have when comeing in contact with light, that's when my pulse quickened and I realized what I actually had on the end of my line, a true behemoth! I had my medium size net along that day. I told my friend, "I'm bringing her up, get ready!" In 4' of water it doesn't take much to bring a fish up off the bottom in landing net's reach. The fish was too large to fit completly in the net, about 2/3 of the fish was in the net when I threw my pole down and grabbed the net from my friend who seemed to be "inconvenienced" by haveing to net a disgusting "carp". Once safely in the boat, and after a couple of minutes to collect my thoughts, it started to sink in. I realized the magnitude of the fish and what it meant to me. I've caught many walleye over 10#s, but never in WI.. I've fished and caught many, many walleye in WI., but none even close to anything like that. To do it in WI. and to be a fish of that caliber exceeded my wildest hopes and dreams. Always expect the unexpected, because you never know when the fish of your dreams may decide to bite your line. The memories from that day's events will always be some of my best. Thinking back now I ask myself, "Was it skill? Was it chance? Was it presentation?......Or, CAN IT BE LUCK? grin.gif

Here's a copy of the Wausau Daily Herald's Outdoor section from Sunday April 11, 2004. The article's about spring walleye fishing in WI.. I was interviewed by Jim Lee, the outdoor editor about my fish and fishing Depere. The article includes some of our discussions. I added the picture because of the poor quality of the scanned image my scanner produced. I took the text from the Herald's website and added the picture that they used.

Once again people, THANK YOU!
And thank you Rick for makeing FM happen! FM ROCKS!!!!!!

Spring walleye fishing good

By Jim Lee
For the Wausau Daily Herald
It's been a super spring for eager walleye anglers.

Excellent success is reported on the Wisconsin, Wolf and Fox rivers, the major waterways open to year-round fishing in central Wisconsin.

"Action has been really good on the Wolf," says Mike Remme, owner of Ma's Bait & Tackle in Fremont.

"Fish were moving up from the downstream lakes in late March and people were catching lots of walleyes in the 14- to 16-inch range."
A surge of unseasonably warm weather and rains in late March created flood conditions and prompted walleyes to migrate upriver in search of spawning grounds. Cooler temperatures arrived with April and have delayed spawning activity. Depending on weather conditions, spawning on the rivers is expected to peak in the coming week.

Wolf River walleyes have the unique habit of spawning over flooded marsh grass, then returning to Lake Winnebago and other downstream lakes to spend the rest of the year.

"When the fish are in the marshes and focused on spawning," says Remme, "there is a five- or six-day period when it doesn't even pay to fish. You just can't get at them or get them to bite."
But when spawning is over and the fish begin drifting back downstream, some of the biggest fish of the spring are caught.

"Prior to the spawn, anglers concentrate their fishing in shallow water, usually sandbars in six feet of water," Remme said. "After the spawn, they fish deeper water. A lot of big female walleyes just ride the current about three feet below the surface. Some fish can still be taken near bottom, but it pays to try different depths."
Small male walleyes typically dominate the pre-spawn fishery, but that is not a problem for Wolf River and Upper Fox River anglers, who enjoy walleye angling under regulations that allow a five-fish limit with no minimum size restrictions.

Gary Schmidt, owner of Mosinee Bait & Taxidermy, said the Wisconsin River in Marathon, Portage and Wood counties has been producing some walleyes, but the best action should come in the next two weeks.

Walleye anglers in that section of the river face a slot-size restriction. While the daily bag limit is five fish, there is a minimum size of 15 inches, along with a stipulation that no walleyes between 20 and 28 inches may be kept. One trophy walleye exceeding 28 inches is allowed.

"The fish haven't spawned yet," Schmidt said. "If the weather warms a bit, it may start this coming week. In the pre-spawn period, the walleyes seem to stack up in deeper water. There hasn't been much going on in the river shallows, but that will change as water temperatures rise."
Fox River anglers at the entrance to Green Bay encounter tight regulations during March and April. The daily walleye bag limit is one fish at least 28 inches in length. For all practical purposes, it is a catch-and-release fishery until May 1, but that restriction has not dulled its appeal.

"You'll see hundreds of boats (on the river below the De Pere dam) on a nice day," said Steve Hogler, fisheries biologist for the Department of Natural Resources.

"You can't beat the fishing when you can catch 100 walleyes or more in a half-day."
Mark Hoffmann of Mosinee boated one of the largest walleyes caught on the Fox River this spring when he landed a 321Ú2-inch, 13-pound, 12-ounce female on March 26.
47b4da35b3127ccebced13124e220000001610

"We fished the river the first time this year on March 24," he said. "We fished below the dam from noon to 10 p.m. and caught close to 200 fish. The average size was 16 to 22 inches.

"I came back on the 26th with two other guys. We fished from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. and probably caught 40 fish. I caught the big one about 7 p.m. The walleyes weren't close to spawning."
Hoffmann said he fished in about four feet or water adjacent to the river channel, which dropped to 18 or 20 feet. The anglers cast three-eighths-ounce jigs tipped with a small plastic twister-type tail and a fathead minnow. On another line, each angler still-fished a minnow on a plain hook and slip-sinker.

On the first trip, "it was a horse apiece as to which tactic worked best," Hoffmann said. "They were biting good. At times we had to fish with only one line because of the number of fish we were catching. They were biting everything as long as it had a minnow on it."
Hoffmann said spring fishing on the lower Fox appears to be the best in several years.

Hogler said Fox River anglers are reaping the benefits of strong walleye reproduction in 2001. Males in that year-class are 16 to 19 inches long. Female walleyes typically enter the spawning cycle a year later than males.

"While the 2001 spawning period was excellent, results of the 2003 spawning season were tremendous," he said, "so the 2006 spring fishing season (when male walleyes from the 2003 class will be sexually mature) should be even better than the current season."

47b4da35b3127ccebced129c0e340000001610


------------------
http://groups.msn.com/canitbeluck

[This message has been edited by can it be luck? (edited 04-19-2004).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Mark...


You ever do "Fish Prints" with any of those fish?


CM

[This message has been edited by CrappieMagnet (edited 04-21-2004).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great fish and even better story CIBL. I was laughing when they were discreetly gathering their crap. Happens all the time LOL. Same with the net - LOL

I want to see what you can do on Pool2! grin.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

canitbeluck,

I noticed on your page quite a few "large" walleyes. Walleyes that appear unable to swim again?

I am not trying to start anything, just curious
about your feelings on selective harvest??

Keep the rods bendin'!!

Jim W

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Mark, who can blame you for keeping that WHOPPER? You have explained yourself enough times to all the trollers on other threads thru the past few months, I don't think you should have to again and again and again!!! Figured it would be a short matter of time before you got confronted on this thread too.

I already congratulated you once on this catch....and I will again....Very nice fish!

Bottomline.....It was legal for him to keep this fish, so he did, his catch, his choice.

How do you cook those whoppers anyways!!!!

Mark....DON'T BITE this time!

fiskyknut

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man Mark I have been wondering the same thing. Were do you find all those large eyes? I guess you have the luck man. Great fish I bet she'll look great on the wall.

------------------
Grip it and Rip it

IFFWalleyes
I Fish For Walleyes
iffwalleyes at yahoo.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Canitbeluck-

Great Fish! I had to also respond because I saw your name mentioned in the newspaper article. My name is also Mark Hoffmann. Strangely enough with the double n at the end - most if not all the Hoffmanns I run into are with one n. Anyway - I know that really is not much of a comment for a fishing forum - but just thought I would mention it. My older brother has said that he loves fishing - but it is nothing compared to my love of the sport. It appears you are the master though!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Fellas! Much appreciated!

Hoffer, 2 Mark Hoffmanns? Cool! Cut and paste your picture in the article...Fool your friends! smile.gif

Jim, I'm sure you've had to have read SOME of the posts in referance to my views of selective harvest? If not, search my past posts. smile.gif

FiskyNut, What's up man? You been spanking them big pike up there in "God's country"?
I was gonna "bite" untill I read your post, now I'll just "nibble".
How do I cook them big boys? Are you crazy? I'm allergic to fish! Oh, I must not have told anyone that I'm a "cat rancher". A fish like that feeds them darn cats for a couple days! JUST KIDDING!
I'm really a vegetarian. I use them to fertilize my garden since trout and musky are hard to catch at times. Since doing this last year, my garden produced 3 tomatos, 9 string beans, and 1 giant sunflower! Not to mention all the extra cats I've been able to catch for my ranching buisness! They must like the smell or something? JUST KIDDING PEOPLE!!!!!! grin.gif
You know Fisky, I should add a link to my signature that takes people to one of the MANY threads in which I explain myself over and over again. It'll make it alot easier that way. The sad part about it is that it's always a thread that starts out to be about biggest fish, most memorable fish, bragging board, congratulatory, well you get the idea. These threads start on a positive note, untill someone actually shows a fish! Then the stones get hurled! And hurled they do! Always.
Are you going fishing with your brother this year on the Detroit River? Heading to Erie in June. Take care, Mark

PS: In the last couple of months I've boated upwards to 500 walleye. I kept 1 fish! The one pictured is the largest thing BY FAR that I've ever caught in WI.. I'll probably never do it again. So yes, she's definitly going on the wall! 500-1, how's that for selective harvest? Maybe I should keep the "eaters", it's probably better to keep 400 eaters than I trophy? Also I have ZERO fish in my freezer. Last fish I caught to eat was at Blackduck and Red lake ice fishing, a few perch and crappies. I did have fish for lunch yesterday though...From Perkins resteraunt! Yuk! wink.gif

------------------
http://groups.msn.com/canitbeluck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Mark...

Will you give me your E-mail addy.

I have something to send you!

Thanks...

CM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is a beauty of a specimen and one to be proud of. Do it justice by having it mounted by an excellent taxidermist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is kind of amusing when the subject of selective harvest or catch and release comes up. More often that not, it seems that the avid fisherman and true sportsman like canitbeluck may catch hundreds of fish and keep one nice keeper for the wall - maybe one or 2 of these fish in a lifetime. Then, you have the other side of the coin where a group of fisherman get on a school of walleyes - fish that are 5,6,7 pounds - breeding females and keep their limit. No pictures are taken, but these fish are kept to eat. This scenario happens all the time. I have 2 fish on my wall from years of fishing. I keep maybe a half dozen small walleyes a year if that. So, whats the bottome line?? I would rather see a picture of a nice trophy fish for the wall - something that is a lifetime fish - rather than hear about the guys who got on a group of walleyes and now their freezer is full of fish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.