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T-ProGuy

Bow Suggestions???

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T-ProGuy

I am looking into buying a new bow for this fall, but am having a tough time making a decision...I have narrowed it down to two. The Matthews LX and the Matthews Classic. The specs are similar for both, but they have different cams, slightly different lengths, brace heights as well as significantly different prices. Could anyone shed some light on this subject for me? Any reason to buy one but not the other? Thanks!

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PerchJerker

Without question, buy whichever bow feels the most comfortable and shoots the best for you (whether it is a Matthews or something else).

After that, I'd say buy the cheaper bow and spend the money on top-quality accessories like arrows, sights, stabilizers, releases, broadheads, etc. And practice fees at the shooting ranges.

Good luck.

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eyesontonka

Proguy

you have an e-mail addy...dont think i can type what i would like too..save some $$$

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jlm

I agree with PJ's post 100%. All the bows on the market, even the less heard of ones are pretty darn good. On the other hand, not all sights, releases, etc. are created equal. Save a little on the bow and go overboard on the rest of the stuff. It does not make any difference what kind of bow you have if you can't see your sight to shoot in low light.

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T-ProGuy

Thanks for the info guys...I definitely agree with the suggestions regarding the accessories. Quality accessories can make all the difference. But, when it has been narrowed down to the two bows I have chosen as potential candidates, with all other variables tossed aside, is there a reason to buy one and not the other?

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eyesontonka

I would check out Alpine bows if i were you...basicaly rated the same as mathews..almost identical bows for half the price..i got a new mathews 3 years ago..i got a new alpine this year..basicaly same bow..way cheaper..look at the stats..cams limbs all the same..price 50%less

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Guest

I'd like to know how Matthews can stay in business if Alpine makes an equal bow for 50% of Matthews price?

Sorry to "toss in" with this rhetorical question, but I've had numerous other manufacturer's Bows in the past and nothing compares to Matthews components and its life-span when used in tough hunting situations year after year.

Don't get me wrong--Hoyt, PSE, Oneida, etc. all make great products but they aren't a Matthews...

It's like comparing a Mercedes to a Ford.

Tonka--is it a cost issue you're comparing or technology and components? I'd really like to hear about your experience with Alpine as I haven't heard of them before.

THanks!

------------------
Chells

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jlm

Chells-
I do agree that Mathews makes fantastic bows, no question about that! However, to imply that they are a better quality bow by just looking at a price tag is wrong in my opinion. I shoot Golden Eagle bows (have shot others as well) and have found them to be of the highest quality and they are fantastic in my opinion. These bows run about 2/3 to 1/2 the price of high end Mathews bows. I put my bows through hell, more so than your average hunter. I have yet to have a problem that was related to the bow. I have had problems with bow ad ons however. I think a lot of it has to do with reputation and maketing. Mathews has always had a vey strong marketing campaign even before they were a popular bow. I had a buddy who shot 3-D tournaments and they gave him a bow to represent their company. This was many years ago. The company did the right thing because all these people were given free bows and were winning tournaments. That is the best advertising anyone could ask for. However, these same people would probably be winning with a bow from another maker. Someone mentioned Alpine bows, these are fantastic bows to...however, you will rarely see much in the way of advertising for them. I suspect that is why they can sell them at such a lower price. Again, in my opinion, any bow on the market today (within reason of course) will do the job. Spend extra on arrows and good quality cutting heads and all the other extras!

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Iceman77

All bows these days are beyond capable of being better than the shooter. As far as saying Mathews is better or Hoyt is better is far from the truth. There are differences in materials used and the geometry of the bows, also the cam options which they choose to use are amongst the biggest differences. The quality of construction in todays bow manufacturers is first rate with few manufacturing defects received by the customer. Certain advantages do exist to certain types of configurations such as Hoyt's split limb technology. This has proven to create considerably longer limb life compared to solid limbs. Solo cams have proven themselves to be better for the average hunter since they don't go out of "time" and the average hunter would never know the difference if it did or didn't. Although they don't realize nor are they ever told but their is a particular "tune" that they should be within as well as the cam and halfs from Hoyt. It is all about particular preferences and what you really need, also how much you choose to spend. I've shot every major bow manufacturers bows out there and I chose what works best for me instead of just choosing the sponsor that would give me the most. I prefer to win and I won't settle for shooting something that won't work as well for me. For some Mathews will shoot better and for other's it maybe Martin. In my case it is Hoyt. From talking to a lot of shooters at local and national tournaments the biggest complaints with Mathews is poor customer service compared to other bow manufacturers. Hoyt typically has long lead times and slow delivery so don't expect a bow from them within a month especially for the top end target bows.

In summary, the Cadillac, Mercedes, Chevy, Dodge thing does not exist in the archery world until you go down to the extremely low end bows. Pick what fits your needs, is comfortable, in your price range, and really fits you physically(ATA lengths, brace height, draw length, draw weight, mass...etc.) and I will guarantee it will be able to shoot better than you any day of the week. You could take the best shooters in the world and the mid-range bows would easily be able to be more consistent than the human can any day of the week.

If you have any in depth questions on setting up a bow when you decide to choose please let me know.

Thanks,
Russ

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metrojoe

If it's in your price range and the bow is comfortable don't hesitate. But bottom line, it's not the bow. It's the skill of the guy behind the string that puts meat in the freezer.

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BLACKJACK

Good post Iceman!!

I personally shoot a Golden Eagle, mainly because it was the first kind that I had bought and I liked the 'feel' of it, and I still do, I'm on my third one. But I did shoot a few others before I bought my last one, and will agree with you that they were all very nice bows that seemed well made.

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Ben1022

You should spend as much as you'd like to...it's your money. But if you want bang for the buck look a little longer. If you bought into the marketing aspect...Mathews may just be the one for you.
Something to consider is your primary type of hunting. If you're primarily shooting deer from a stand...ANY bow will work. Then you have to find the one that fits your comfort zone and price range. All the rest is fluff. However if you are going to be spotting and stalking, you will likely look for something that will allow you to shoot longer shots, which will entail using a good sight w/smaller pins, a faster flatter shooting bow and consistent arrows. (Straightness and weight tolerances). I think conventional wisdom says that price and quality aren't interchangeable and don't necessarily paint the whole picture. i.e. the higher price doesn't dictate the best product. Does a mfg that has been around as a prominent mfg for about 10 years that has probably the largest marketing budget mean it has the best bow/accessories?! Nah, I don't belive so.
I worked for a major mfg and will tell you that the proof is in the pudding. All the marketing is a necessary part of any company but the shooters will tell you what is good and what is not. You can paint a pretty bow and make it sound good but if it doesn't do what it says and you have trouble getting the problem remedied...you are in for some headaches. I'm not just talking warranty issues...I'm talking about getting a part or parts if YOU are the reason something breaks. And then I'd check to see if the company is going to ding you for the part. A good bow, in my opinion, comes from a company that is able to fix the problem and do it quickly and cheaply. Most people sit on "dead center" until July and start getting ready for the season. This is where you see whether you're going to get your parts before the season and have time to get back on track or get a cock and bull story why it's not available.
Marketing has to play some part of your decision but don't over look other bows because the mfg doesn't throw and ad in your eyes, where ever you look.

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Guest

JLM,If you re-read my response I did not compare Matthews to other bows based on price.

I specifically mentioned components and technology not price.

Lastly, I realize other manufacturers offer bows that rival Matthews--my personal experience with the product is where my .02 comes from, not how much Matthews advertises or provides freebies to some archers.

I buy my bows like you do--with my own money grin.gif

I'm still waiting for eyestonka to respond to the Alpine question if you're interested.

I like to know what else is out there to keep an open mind grin.gif

------------------
Chells

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HUNTER2

I tried many different types of bows before I decided to buy the Matthews LX. I love it. I have both carbon and aluminum arrows. I tried grouping them and the aluminum arrows seem to group a little better. I even stuck one inside the other. A guy at work said you know what you have there? I said what? He said two wrecked arrows. Just try a bunch of them and you will be able to tell. I just thought the Matthews felt smoother and had great let off.

------------------
Hunt&Fish tell you drop!
I.B.O.T's 250 & 249

[This message has been edited by HUNTER2 (edited 07-20-2004).]

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eyesontonka

chells

Let me say this..when you compare leapold scopes to swift scopes..you know what the difference is???..the price and warranty..optics are made from the same place..i have owned swift scopes for 22 years and not 1 problem..same thing aply;s in this situation..i cant say i have owned Alpine for very long but when i compare the 2 side by side..Alpine fits (me) better and less sound when ya release..also 75% of the bow is basicaly made with the same as mathews..now for the average bow hunter this seems like a deal..i try and get a new bow every couple years perviding i can find 1 that fits my style..in my younger years i hunted 7 days a week weather permitting..i also shot 7 days a week..so i basicaly wore my bows out in my opinion...

So what i'm saying is just do a lil research..if your looking for a brand name so you can say hey i own a mathews what do you shoot..or if you want a cheaper bow that basicaly ='s the same as a brand name or even better..

everyone has there own ideas on whats better..since i have used a lot of different things in a lot of different situations i feel good with what i use...thats 99% of it all..if it works for you great..if it dont then change it thats what i had to do..i'm just try'n to give a guy another idea to save a lil money and in my opinoin get a bow thats just as good as long as it fits his or her style..

By the way..how many bow hunters keep using there bows for years..most people out grow the bow they own either by weight or draw length way before the bow is actualy wore out..so when you go to trade or sell this bow you payed a grand for you get about the same for it as the 1 you payed half for...not much..

[This message has been edited by eyesontonka (edited 07-26-2004).]

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