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Guest

Im thinking about putting in at MB Johnson and checking out the red? Besides Logs are there any big concerns with the current water level and any places i should try to avoid?

Shawn

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Bruce

Anytime you are on the river in a motor boat you need to use caution to avoid damaging the lower unit and prop on your motor. Be sure you have your motor set in the unlocked position so it will kick up if you hit something. I would also advise to never go more than 15 MPH on the river. You never can be sure if it will be clear for the lower unit. There can be logs one or two feet under the water surface that you can't see, but sure will be able to feel with your motor. You need to use more caution going upstream than downstream because the underwater objects will be more directly pointed at your boat when going against the current. I would advise you to put on a rockhopper motor gaurd on the lower unit of your motor for Red River fishing. The rockhopper has saved my motor several times in the last year. You can get a custom made rockhopper to fit your motor from: Ken Jacobson 16140 Lynch Avenue Lakeville, MN 56044. His phone # is 952-898-3441. They cost about $125 and are well worth the investment if you plan to use your boat on the Red River. Bruce

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Guest

by the way i have a small 14 foot aluminum boat with a 18 hp tiller, im hoping the smaller size might be to my advantage

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Guest

I would also highly recommend the "Rock Hopper" lower unit protection system.

After seeing how well it preformed on Bruces 4 stroke in 1-2' of thumper bumper water, I am sold! They can occasionally require a minor retrofitting job to get a solid fit on some motors styles, but it is a easy and cheap fix, well worth it.

Cheap and functional protection that will not reduce your HP or performance, it even enhances overall performance on many rigs.

------------------
Backwater Eddy..><,sUMo,>

Backwater Guiding
"Ed on the RED"
(701)-281-2300

[email protected]

http://home.talkcity.com/ResortRd/backwtr1/index.html

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ibwhnt

Always watch the water it will tell you what you need to know. If you see a large boil stear around it, its telling you that there is something under the water surface that you could hit. I always try to stay in the main current since it will be the deeper part of the channel. Good Luck and be safe.

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Guest

Learning to read currents is a very good idea but far from any sure thing as to where the deadheads are hidden. At night things get more complicated and confusing, so keep your speed down to limit potential damage or injury. Night running requires a good spotlight and a good memory to limit bad karma.

You can hit wood at any river level and in any part of the river, including the main channel. Every time the river rises or falls you will encounter new hazards. One day a section may be safe, the next it will eat your prop, or worse. Plus deadheads will move from run off pushing them around or just for fun I think.

Something to keep in mind is when there is a lot of traffic on a river the boat will dislodge logs from snag piles with the wakes they produce. The more traffic the more you better watch out for floating or suspended thumpers.

When there is a lot of debris floating on the river be sure to check your lower unit for branches when you’re anchored up. Lift it up to be sure it is clear of junk before you fire it up. I have lost more props and pins by NOT checking for accumulated junk then anything else. So I eventually learned to check for junk before moving from every anchoring position. You will be amazed at what you will find hanging from the lower unit even after a short time anchored up.

If possible do not lock you motor down be sure to allow it to pop if you hit submerged object.

Mark obstacles that may be missed at night with reflective tags. I recommend FireTacks for this job. They are easy to use and remove for reuse, and far cheaper then a prop or lower unit rebuild! If you are a bow hunter you may be familiar with the system already.

I have adapted the FireTacks system for use in night fishing situations. They work great to mark pre-scouted hot spots or dangerous obstacles. They come in a few different models and colors so you can mark things the way you wish, and keep the other guys guessing. I find the pyramid shaped FireTacks to be the easiest to spot from any angle, even in the rain or fog.

They can be seen at this site. http://www.firetacks.com/
I am working on a article with the system laid out in more detail, look for it before fall, just in time for a piggy walleye hunt at night.

wink.gif

Hope this helps.

Ed

------------------
Backwater Eddy..><,sUMo,>

Backwater Guiding
"Ed on the RED"
(701)-281-2300

[email protected]

http://home.talkcity.com/ResortRd/backwtr1/index.html

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • riverrat21
      Ive been out a few times as well..have tried from the harbor all the way up to boyscout...have been getting a few everytime out but has been slow for me....been trolling crawlers with big colorado blades..have caught fish on flats by barkers,between the bridges,and out from clyde area....got 6 cats accidentally while trolling boards by the community hole south west side of spirit lake...water clarity still sucks in the harbor..a bit better the farther up river u go...has it been kinda slow for everyone?????ive been doing better on fish lake.lol
    • Grainbelt
      And they are big, feels like you have a bass on! We thru them all back.
    • delcecchi
      I haven't done it on all my stuff, but I don't avoid using a bait because I mashed the barbs.   It would probably be a good idea to mash more of them, even if just to make it easier to get them out when they get hooked on something like clothing or a rag.  
    • monstermoose78
    • Wanderer
      Manitoba requires the same, and I agree, we didn’t notice a difference either except for keeping bait on the hook.  It’s just a hard mental block to get around. @LBerquist, ouch!  Unfortunately I know what those are like.  Both getting them out of myself and helping others!  You can pinch the barbs down on any hook though.  Some lay down nice and others will break off, leaving just a little bit of a rough bump which I kind of like better.  There’s a little bit of grip left that way.
    • whateverisbiting
      Thanks for the tip something new to try 🙂
    • LBerquist
      I wish barb less hooks were more available. I'd switch, heard they come out easier....
    • Borch
      The gulp crawlers in packages are tougher than those in the alive container.  The one in the picture is from the alive container.  Both versions work well on spinner and slow death rigs. 
    • Borch
      Gulp crawler.  In the spot the walleyes were going in there was a pile of 3-5" perch that tore up the real crawlers.   Gulp crawlers took care of the issue and the eyes liked them too. 
    • delcecchi
      When we go to Quetico, barbless or mashed down barbs is mandatory.   To tell the truth I haven't noticed that we lose more fish with barbless than barbed.   Not catching muskies though.  Pike, walleye, bass, lake trout.