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OutdoorMN News - Zebra mussel larvae confirmed in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County


Rick

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An independent laboratory has confirmed zebra mussel larvae in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County.

The lab provided photos of two zebra mussel larvae, called veligers, found in a water sample taken from the lake. Property owners on Garfield Lake hired the lab as part of their own monitoring. Invasive species specialists from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources found no zebra mussels in the lake during a six-hour dive survey.

Garfield Lake will be added to the Infested Waters List for zebra mussels, with the provision that it may be removed from the list if future surveys continue to show no zebra mussels in the lake.

Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:

  • Clean watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,
  • Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and
  • Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash.

Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:

  • Spray with high-pressure water.
  • Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds).
  • Dry for at least five days.

As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.

Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed in another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.

People should contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.

More information is available at www.mndnr.gov/AIS.

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