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cw642

Why Are Labs best?

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cw642

So here it is, the million dollar question. Why are labs the best overall breed ever? It seems to many on this board are breed blind thinking that their breed is the best. We have to realize that if we were in another part of the nation Labs are nothing but lawn ornaments used for a week or two of duck season(drive through the suburbs and you will see many around here the same way). In the North East its setters and chessies. All through the South and West its big running Pointers and Coon hounds. The wonderful thing about MN is the extremes we face during our hunting seasons. 100 degrees the first week of grouse to -20 the last week of pheasant. So why is the Lab so well prepared for all MN hunting seasons it should be mentioned in every post regarding another breed?

CW

The next question will be, what breed is at it's breeders demise because if over-breeding and genetic defects?

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kentuck_ike

AMEN

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rundrave

Its been said earlier on this site and I cant remember who said it.

The best dog is the one you have and work with.

If it does what YOU want and YOU are happy why should anyone else tell you its not the best???

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LABS4ME

Chris, I guess I don't understand your post. Are you trying to open a true debate or instigate an argument? The best breed is the one you choose to work with.... plain and simple. Then you have devoted followers because they had success with a certain breed. In the end does it effect you personally if people choose to post to consider a lab? I myself usually stay out of those debates... It's Ford - Chevy - Dodge...

I'm sure you look at your English pointers as the best breed because they suit you and your style of hunting and training, and Ben I'm sure there is no other breed you'd own other than a Brittany, because again, it fits you and you've had success hunting and breeding them.

In the end it is up to each individual to decide what breed they would like to own and if they end up feeling it's the best breed out there, what is the harm to you?

As far as indiscriminate breedings, it's not just in labs. Though there are many more indiscriminate breedings with labs because there are more labs, but it happens in all breeds. It is up to each individual to choose their breeder wisely. If they don't and money is the only issue, there will be a high chance that they will pay the piper in the end. I've been open and addressed this in many posts... the downfall of any breed will be all the poor breedings that happen on a daily basis... I feel there is a direct correlation between being on top of the AKC's list of popularity and a high preponderance to genetic defects, but that does not mean ALL labs will be shed in the same light. There are many devoted breeders who are doing a stand-up job producing sound animals and they will be the king pin that holds the breed together.

And as far as people being blind about their breed being best, everyone is guilty of that to some extent. I'm sure you will agree that you are and I'm sure Ben will certainly admit the same and so will JbDragon and so on and son. So be it! It's no different than your wife being the best or your kid being the best... It's called pride!

Good Luck!

Ken

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grousehunter

Chessies are the best!!! LOL grin.gif j/k, well kind of.

Whatever dog you put effort into and get on a lot of birds with will be the best, more birds/obedience equals better dog in my mind.

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Harmonica Bear

That kind of reminded me of my first hunting dog, a mix, shorthair/springer. We were hunting down by Luverne. Having some beers after a day of hunting, one of the guys from down there came up to me and offered his compliments on the good dog work.

I said thanks and then he said

"What kind of dog is that anyway?"

I said " a bird dog"

to which he replied "I know that, but what kind of bird dog?"

I couldn't resist and said "a "GOOD" bird dog!"

Anyway, it was quite funny at the time, but it does hold true. The best dog is the one that works good for you.

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anyfishwilldo

 Originally Posted By: rundrave

The best dog is the one you have and work with.

If it does what YOU want and YOU are happy why should anyone else tell you its not the best???

Very well said.

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so haaad

I'd rather push a Lab than drive a Chessie. grin.gif

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Dahitman44

I think it is very much a personal choice. I love labs and can't understand why everyone in the world does not have one. It has taken over the cocker spaniel as America's top breed recently.

They have such a great combination of attributes. hard to beat a lab.

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JConrad

If Labs were the best overall hunting breed ever they would be one of the Versitle Hunting dogs and they are not... As far as all around hunting dogs there are w/o question better breeds thus the North American Versitle Hunting Dog Association and breeds..

I do think Labs are great retrievers but not overall hunting dogs..

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rundrave

Labs are not recognized as a versatile breed by NAVHDA for lots of reasons. Even if the lab people say their lab points(STAND birds is what I call it for labs) they wont be recognized.

One reason I can think of, is the advanced NAVHDA testing (the utility test) there is the independent duck search. My opinion on labs, and Im sure people are gonna cry foul over this, is that they are substantially more dependent on their handlers in this regard. Where as the pointers dont need any handling. Does that mean all pointers can pass the duck search? no way!

There are many good comparison of versatile breeds to specialist breeds.

However I think there will be a few specimens within a breed that can complete all of the tasks. Like wise, there are probably some labs out there that can complete a Utility test.

I dont want to make this a debate, see my first post in this thread and you will see where I am really coming from.

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jbdragon17

If I were a duck hunter I wouldnt hesitate to get a Lab. I am a grouse hunter first. For this reason I have a setter and always will have one. In addition to that I can honestly say I have never been around dogs better suited for family life.

But like everyone else has been saying. The "Best" dog can ONLY be a personal opinion.

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311Hemi

 Originally Posted By: rundrave
Even if the lab people say their lab points(STAND birds is what I call it for labs) they wont be recognized.

I was going to stay out of this one also....lol.

But...only in reference to this sentence, what is the difference between your 4-6 month old pointer pointing a bird and a 4-6 lab pointing a bird (with no outside influences of training)?

I understand they are not recognized by the NAVHDA, but there are other venues in which labs have done quite well vs. the other breeds.

As has been said....The "Best" dog can ONLY be a personal opinion. The best one will be the one that works best for you!!!

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rundrave

my pointers point on instinct

if you indeed have a pointing lab then how come some people classify labs as retrievers and some classify them as "POINTERS"?

If your lab does point on instinct, has that instinct always been there? If it was then wouldnt all labs point?

Perhaps it was introduced from somewhere else....maybe another versatile breed?

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MNpurple

I sure cant say a Lab is the best, but I only have room for one dog, so I needed a dog that could......chase roosters all day in the grass, wrestle down and haul a goose across a cornfield, jump into frigid water on a 0 degree day, be a good pet first and foremost, protect and care for a family and kids and be able to do all of these on the same day with no ill effects. A lab seemed to fit that bill better than most others, for me.

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311Hemi

Well, I certainly don't classify any Labrador Retriever as a "pointer", and anyone that does it wrong. However, I may call it a Labrador Retriever that points....or Pointing Lab for short. I really hate even using that term/name, because of this exact discussion.

Has the instinct always been there....I believe it has. And no, that would not mean all labs point. I do believe that the trait can be bread for when you have one that shows this instinct. Can it be proven that it was introduced from another breed...not sure....I know this speculation is always out there by people that don't believe a lab can point.

But I also know that I can take certain young labs into the field with birds and have them lock up with no formal training. My only point (no pun intended) was that they are not standing game, it is instinct. Have some been trained to stand game...for sure. Those that have should not be considered Labrador Retrievers that point.

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Dahitman44

The way I look at it is this --

Is Copper the best hunting dog in the planet? No. Could I have bought a different breed that is "considered" a better hunter? Yes.

But all-in-all it is hard to beat a lab. That is why he is so popular.

I don't need something with a bunch of letters NAVAHDADFA bla bla to tell me if labs are good hunters -- they are.

;\)

Hitman

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LABS4ME

Some Labs point.... who knows how the instinct got there...

Some pointers retrieve... who knows how the instinct got there...

(All purebreds were mutts at some point in time....)

BIG DEAL!!! They are all our hunting buddies... who cares what breed you chose... if you enjoy a specialist (Setter in the upland covert or a Chessie in a marsh hauling out crippled geese) go get 'em! If you choose a versatile breed or a lab or springer to wear as many hats as possible go get 'em...

There is no one breed better than the other! WOW! I can't believe this has gotten as much play as it has... The best breed is the one you choose!!!

Good Luck!

Ken

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311Hemi

LOL...Ken. You know this was bound to happen when the first post was written!! whistle.gif

Too many of us sitting behind the computer to take the bait and not out on the ice fishing where we should be!!!

John

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duckbuster

I'm wondering if the initial post was meant to point out that LABS, I believe, are the #1 owned dog according to AKC.

Is that possible?

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Bryce

So... since I'm taking my labs up to Red this weekend. If they "point" a crappie, are they now eligible to run in NAVHDA?

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fishingbuddy

My lab points perch...LOL

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cw642

The whole point of my question was to get some feed back as to why when people post a question about another breed, someone has to say get a lab. I thought that maybe I should jump on the bandwagon and get a few. Just to see what I am missing.

CW

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PikeBayCommanche

Of course CW. I love dogs and what Labs4ME said was right. We all take pride in what our dogs do for us and there is absoulty nothing wrong with that.

Right now even though I own only Labs I find myself wanting a Lwellin Setter also for some Grouse hunting up north.

Hopefully my kennel gets larger in the next few years that will allow that to happen.

cool.gif

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Roofer

I know labs are the easiest to find. Mine came right up to me in my yard and hasn't left yet. Smartest dog I have ever seen.

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