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blarkey

european mount

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blarkey

anybody know or a good place around the metro that does this, and do they look cool?

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dakotakid31

there is a guy in waite park that does it. in the Oct 19th outdoornews. around $75.Rorri Peterson is his name.

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DeanoB

thats the guy who uses the beetles huh? that was a good read, I was thinking if i got a buck this year i would drive up there, and have it done

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bos

( Note from Admin,please read forum policy before posting again.Thank-you.)

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Jim916

I have seen pictures of some European head mounts where the skull has been camo dipped. the cost was around $75. I think some of them looked pretty cool, something diferent.

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blarkey

would like to see what that looks like

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Jim916

not sure if we can name companies on here but go to google and search for: mount "custom dipped" and it will be the first one that comes up. I have seen it other places just don't remeber where. It sounds like they can do any camo pattern on it.

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Dag_1979

Post deleted by Dag_1979

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Royce Aardahl

I do my own, I boil it for a while then pick everything off. Then I use some bleech to make it whiter. Kinda fun.

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harvey lee

Quote:

not sure if we can name companies on here but go to google and search for: mount "custom dipped" and it will be the first one that comes up. I have seen it other places just don't remeber where. It sounds like they can do any camo pattern on it.


If you look at the forum policy link at the top of this page one can see all the rules for posting such things as contact info.

Many stores sell the kits with the peroxide and other needed material to do this yourself.

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Stratosman

It's easy to do yourself, if you have the stomach...It isn't really that bad but it can stink a little. ooo.gif

I use peroxide instead of bleach as bleach can harm the skull, making it chalky. Done about 10-12 in the past years.

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BradB

There is a woman named Storm Amacker in Saint Paul who does a very professional job with this. I believe her business provides skeletons to medical schools and other scientific programs who study anatomy. She has done 3 of my bucks and I have been very satisfied. It takes a full year.

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Royce Aardahl

wow, it takes me about half a day. i use onion soup broth when I boil the skull. smells ok then grin.gif I've only done 8 but I like them.

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