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slabslayer28

Please help

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slabslayer28

i will be coming to the pond on june 18-20 i believe i will be staying at eddys and plan on fishing...ALOT! im from the detroit lakes area and fish alot around the area ive only really tried fishing the lake once at about the same time last year. its like a whole new world there. i just need some tips on how to catch the eyes ill have minnows leeches and night crawlers im already getting prepared i guess from what ive been reading people have been using snells to rapalas. any rigs that might garantee a good time? and where should i fish. like i said guys its a whole new world on mille lacs. any info will be greatly apreciated.

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LindyRigger

During the day, use long snells 7-10ft with a red hook and a chartrues bead above the hook...with a leech or crawler Fish out on the mud flats, focusing on the edges...and hold on!!!

At night find the rock piles with slip bobber and a leech...I have also had good luck slip bobber on the edge of the same daytime flats.

The night ban is off, so you don't need to be in before 10:00pm.

Good luck!!! laugh.gif

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slabslayer28

thank you LR its kind of hard to get some info from the people who know what to do sometimes

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MuskieSlayer

Quote:

slip bobber and a leech


I've been doing very well this year keeping it simple.

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slabslayer28

thanks muskie slayer. another thing do i wanna troll or drift(wind permitting) and it is mandatory to have a drift sock

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Nova

you can do either trolling or drifting, but if you are runner a plain snell(no spinner) try to keep your speed around .5 to .7 mph. If you run a spinner and crawler keep your speed between 1 to 1.5 mph. The best bite for us has been a leech on a plain snell(maybe one beed). Snell length will make a difference. Start about 10' and you can always shorten it up. Crawlers on a plain snell have been working also, but leeches seem to be better. A spinner rig with a crawler if it's wind and you can't keep your speed down. Definately the mud flats for numbers, but I think you will find less keepers out there. Like mentioned above, keep it simple and stay on the edges of the flat. Keep an eye on your graph. You will mark fish all over from the top of the flat to the edge to the bottom edge, find the better concentration of "ACTIVE" fish and continue to work there. Good luck, the bite is on, Enjoy.

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slabslayer28

thanks Nova and thanks to you all you guys who gave me information, its been a big help.

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elusivecrappiecatcher

I don't mean to sound dumb in which I will but oh well. I am heading up to the big pond this weekend, and will be fishing the edge of oh say 7 mile or the 8 mile flats. I have a lowrance with a lake master chip so it won't be hard to find or get to. But my "DUMB" question is, what do you guys mean by using a "snell? Is this just a swivel clip with a lindy rig weight and then say 7' to 10' feet of line and a hook with a yellow bead? or am I wrong? How in the heck do you guys not make a mess of 7 to 10 feet of lead?

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Schnauzer

The "snell" is the length of line and hook you have beyond your swivel. So, there is your line from your reel, then your lindy slip sinker, then a swivel to stop the slip sinker, then your "snell" which is the rest of the line to the hook. That is why you will hear people refer to different length snells. On Mille Lacs, snells typically are longer than they are fished on other lakes using the same presentation.

For example, when I rig with slip sinkers, I use #6 fireline on my reel, but then use #6 vanish for my 9' snell.

"snell" is just a term used for line/hook on the business end of your line when rigging.

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Nova

there are no dumb questions. You are correct. a snell is just a chunk of line, however long you desire with a plain hook and a bead or two(again personal preference) the other end has a swivel and above that is some type of weight that can slide up and down the line above the swivel. I don't normally run a bead, but on occasion will put one single bead on. Now when running spinners that is a whole different story. The snell is the same thing, most usually consist of 6-10 beads and maybe a floater with 2 hooks below it and a spinner blade and clevis above it. Hope that helps.

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elusivecrappiecatcher

Thanks fellas, I was on the right track and correct for the most part I guess. God two more days and I will be sitting on the lake! My buddy has been bugging to take him fishing for awhile now and I am his best man and he doesn't want to go out or to any bars, so I asked if he wanted to go fishing somewhere so me, him and another buddy are going to the pond early saturday hopefully will get the morning bite in, and then see how long we can bare the heat. Should be fun. I am stopping at Gander Mountain on the way home and getting some more tackle, and summ stuff to make this setup you guys are talking about. I usually run maybe a 3 foot max snell. But if you guys are saying 7-10 I will try a 10 footer and go from there. Thanks again for the advice!

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ifishsd

We docked our boat at Eddy's this past weekend. 7 foot snell with a chartuese hook and leech worked the best for us. Also got some on a red hook with blue bead. We fished 28 to 30 feet of water on the flats.

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slabslayer28

when im out there do i wanna be hitting the bottem or what? what size weight should i be using? has anyone been catching any on lindy rigs?

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slabslayer28

another thing i must ask is what color spinner blades people have been using and what kind of set up there using(bead color, snell length, hook color/size, ect) thanks guys

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ifishsd

I was using a 1/2oz no-snagg sinker most of the time. You want to feel the bottom. Also used a regular 1/2oz lindy weight. I did catch one walleye on a floating lindy rig. Seemed like the green hook was the best.

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Nova

I almost always use a 3/4 oz lindy sinker. I like to be as vertical as I can. Keep in contact with the bottom, but don't drag for the most part, just drop the sinker every once in a while to make sure you know how far off you are. For spinner color it varies day to day, but the rule of thumb is hammerred silver when it's sunny and hammerred gold when it's cloudy. The yellow and green spinners work good also. I like to put a couple green, yellow and orange beads on(perch colors) and sometimes a gold floater before the blade. I run green #4 gamakatsu hooks on the spinners rigs and 6-8' snells.

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slabslayer28

ive been stocking up all week in anticipation for this trip ive been making all kinds of rigs i have lindy rigs with green red and chart. hooks just plain snells, spinner set ups, is drift sock a must out there or should i be fine, any suggestions on what flats to go to, where should i be in the morning and where should i be towards the evening confused.gif

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ifishsd

we used a drift sock Saturday. every boat I saw had one out also. Sunday we had to troll with the electric because there wasn't any wind.

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dlrushin1

Nova, are you using the 3/4oz lindy sinkers on Lindy rigs or spinners?

Thanks

DL

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still_fishing

I would suggest fishing the mud flats. Do you have a GPS? I can give you some gps coor. near Eddies. There is a flat I have been fishing since opener that has been producing lots of walleyes only a couple miles out.

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elusivecrappiecatcher

If you can give me the coordinate I have a H20C with the new lakemaster! that would be great Winds are going to be light tomorrow.

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slabslayer28

yes i do have a gps but the the one i have wont let me put cordinates in or im not sure how to on it i also have a map of the lake that comes with cordinates

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hiwayman33

Great Post and lots of information! Quick question, I am planning on launching the boat out of Eddys tomorrow morning. Is there good structure relatively close? My wife is coming with me and would like to not head out to far. Had a blast out of Eddys on opener getting our limit by noon on the sand. Did well last year on the breaks by the Conoco. Will we need to head to say Shermans flat or is there is some good gravel close by? Appreciate any info.

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slabslayer28

well guys i think i am ready for my mille lacs trip i just bought a drift sock today, ive been buying pretty much everything thats been working for people. thanks guys for all the help you gave me its apreciated. i just need a few more tips on where to go out there.

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