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beeonkey

Reserving camp sites

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beeonkey

I have herd that this year maybe the last year for go find an open camp site. Has anyone else herd anything about this? If so how did they say this would be policed? I think it could have some benefits and down falls.

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nblasin

We camped there a few times last year and talked with some rangers and it was never mentioned. I guess I personally like it as first come first serve. Doesn't mean it couldn't happen though I guess.

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duckster

It is just a rumor. There are no plans to go to a reservation system anytime soon. There are times that I wish there was a reservation system, especially after I have burned a tank of gas looking for a site. But if that does happen it will be out in the future sometime.

There are two new group sites in the park for 14-30 people that can be reserved. There also is a $35 per night charge for using the group sites.

Duckster

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Wade Joseph

Duckster, can you give me an idea where the group sites are? Lat and Longs will work if need be.

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chris63

I think when they started the "permit"issuing a couple of years back they said then that they do limit the number of people they let use the park but it seems to me we've had times when we can't find a site either.(mostly on summer weekends)Still some of the best sights and fishing in the upper 48(imo)c63

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chris63

Wolf pack........ooooooooooooooooooooooo.Was that a wolfy? confused.gifoh no Im scared.bye grin.gif

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duckster

Wade,

The group sites are on Kabetogama and Rainy. The Kab site is on the north shore of Kab near Cuculus Island. It is at the site of Jeno Palluci's old cabin if you know where that was.

The Rainy group site is on the west end of the Brule south of bouy C13

You can get reservations starting on June 4th at www.recreation.gov or 877-444-6777. If you want more info on the sites try www.nps.gov/voya Hope this helps.

Duckster

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Wade Joseph

Thanks Duck. No problem with me, I use Sandpoint and namakan campsites.

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sachem longrifle

Quote:

Wade,

The group sites are on Kabetogama and Rainy. The Kab site is on the north shore of Kab near Cuculus Island. It is at the site of Jeno Palluci's old cabin if you know where that was.

The Rainy group site is on the west end of the Brule south of bouy C13

You can get reservations starting on June 4th at
or 877-444-6777. If you want more info on the sites try
Hope this helps.

Duckster


I forgot that Palluci did have a cabin on Kab(jerk). Are all the sites by reservation now or can you still camp anywhere you want but just have to reserve the campsites that are set up by the Park Service

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guts

Sachem, the only sites requiring reservations at this time, are the two group sites mentioned by duckster. The remaining campsites are first come, first serve. Campers are not allowed overnights at houseboat sites, but otherwise they may stay at any of the other VNP campsites and only need to register as they go into the park.

Non VNP sites fall under some discretionary rules as to distance from existing campers and etc, might want to check regulations. good luck guts

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duckster

Sachem,

You can camp anywhere still but need a permit. If you camp in a undesignated site you have to be at least 200 yards from a developed site, at least 1/4 mile from a developed area (boat ramp, visitor center), and at least 200 yards away from any structure. I prefer to camp in a designated site because of the food locker, table and fire-ring. I hope that this answers your questions.

Duckster

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