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RECIPES from the 2007 swap

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Here is for a posting of your Swap recipes if you don't want to send the pattern with your flies (or if you forgot)

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Here's what I sent along. I also sent little $$$ to WxGuy for postage - It cost $1.35 to mail my package. And unwraping, packaging, mailing - Give Wx some support.

Hook: Size 6 Gamakatsu, I actually like size 4 for Red Lake, but figured 6 for general use.

Thread: Orvis 6/0 tan.

Eyes: Red or black micro dumbells. Forward for “jigger”, back for a “slider”. Jiggers seem to be better.

Tail: White marabou with a few strands rootbeer crystal flash, some have a couple tan/black sili legs.

Body: Some are back wrapped with 2 strands rootbeer crystal flash.

Underwing: Tan craft fur, some striped with a black sharpie.

Wing: Two strands crystal flash and a few strands black bucktail.

Fishing instructions: I use a 6 or 7 weight with a 10’ leader. It’d be more sporting with a smaller rig, but I can’t get the distance. Cruise around by XXXXXX (X’s mean I’d rather the whole internet world not show up) until you find fish on sonar. Usually 6-7’ in late spring. Anchor and cast long, let it sink. The fish usually grab on the fall and it can be tough to feel the take. Watch the line for movement. It’s very slight. Keep all slack out of your line. If they don’t grab on the fall, slowly strip about 8” at a time keeping the fly just off the bottom. Don’t give up on a cast! Sometimes they follow all of the way back to the boat. For some reason, crappies really inhale these flies. They don’t dink around like they do with bait. In fact, I’ve out fished bait fisherman several times using this technique. And don’t be at all surpirsed if you land a walleye!

Good Luck!


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"Crayfish Clouser"

Hook: Size 2 Gamakatsu B10S (Stinger)

Thread: Flymaster Plus Black.

Eyes: 3/16” Dumbells (some silver, some brass, some copper).

Tail: I used natural pheasant marabou. Typically two feathers seemed about the right volume. I tied them in opposing one another, but that probably doesn’t matter. Also, two strands of light olive “super floss” tied in the middle of the piece so that you get four pieces trailing back. (I’ve also tied this pattern using orange and black “silillegs”, which I think looks good too.)

Body: Wapsi wooly bugger chenille, medium, cream colored. This stuff has some crystal flash type material woven into it. I think it looks good.

Wing: Same as the tail, but both feathers tied straight back over the middle of the fly.

I’ve tied this pattern with natural turkey marabou and dark chenille as well. I mostly just fish it down and across through deeper water with current – But I think that is mostly due to the river I fish. I think this pattern could be fished many different ways in different water types.

I got the original pattern from Scott Struiff (sp??) at the Fly Angler and I think he may deserve credit for the conception of this fly - not sure though. He carries mostly olive and brown in the shop.

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Black Wet Attractor

hook #10 wide gap

1.5" lead on the shank

goose biot tale

peacock hearl body

pink dubbing between the body and the hackle

black hackle with two red wing/bloodstreak things.

WX Guy are they differant enough?

I think they'll catch just about anything. Trout when the bigger ones are hungry. They should be heavy enough to help drag a little nymph down deep when fished in a combo rig. I think they'll pound the sunnys and crappies, and do ok on the bass too. I was trying for an all around buggy thing. They're kind of heavy. hope they stay together. I'm not too sure about what I'm doing yet.

My 11 year old daughter watched while I tied them and wants to get in on the next swap. She's pretty good, creative too. Sure is a great pass time we can do together.


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"Mini-Me Reynolds"

hook: #6 Cabelas Model 40,4X Long Streamer Hook (Mustad equivalent: 9674)

eyes: 3/16" brass hourglass eyes, nickel; black paint pen/sharpie

tail: white rabbit strip, 2"; 4-5 strands pearl krystal flash; 2 strands gold krystal flash.

body: red crosscut rabbit, 2”

thread: Danville 3/0 pre-waxed monocord white; UNI-thread 4mm thin clear mono

cement: Loon clear head; Hard as Nails, “diamonds” color

Tie in the white thread and wrap a base along the hook shank to the hook bend and back to the eye. Tie in the hourglass eye about ¼ of the way back form the eye (or about 3 eye lengths) using a figure eight pattern. Whip finish and tie off. Cement the thread wraps around the eye using the Loon clear head; let dry.

Tie in the clear mono thread. Trim about a ¼ inch of hair off from the tip of the white rabbit strip. Tie in the strip about a third of the way up from the hook bend, back to just above the hook bend. Find the middle of the strands krystal flash, and tie in at the base of the tail. Bend the strands back along the other side of the hook shank and wrap. Whip finish. Tie in the crosscut rabbit strip at the base of the tail, again trimming the ¼ inch of hair off from the tip. Make sure the hairs are facing the direction of the hook bend. Wrap the thread forward, towards the eye. Palmer the crosscut strip forward to the eye. Whip finish and tie off. Coat the thread wraps around the eye with the Hard as Nails. Paint in an eye with paint pen. Dry

This fly is a miniature version of Barry Reynold’s pike fly. Since not everyone has a rod heavier than an 8 weight, I toned the size down so most of you would be able to fish this on your equipment. While originally designed for pike, this fly will also catch bass, panfish, walleye, and big trout. This fly can be fished aggressively, as well as like a traditional streamer. The rabbit will give this fly a lot of movement in the water, and the krystal flash should give off just enough flash as to not spook wary fish. Using a Duncan loop, or other loop knot, to attach to the fly will increase movement and help add realism to the fly.

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Wire-Gill Bucktail

Hook 1/0 basically any straight shank bigger than 6

Thread clear 6/0 but again, you can use any color you choose

Gills and Weight Red Ultra Wire

Wing Was white bucktail on bottom, and olive on top

Eyes are just black dots from a paint marker

Head coating is 5min epoxy

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Black Leech Streamer

(made the name up, call it what you like)

-size 8 streamer hook 2x long

-black or gold conehead

-.025 lead wire

-black 3/0 thread

-black marabou

-black polar chenille

Very simple, straight forward tie.

1. Put on the conehead.

2. Wrap about 12 turns of lead wire toward the hook bend. Then sparsely wrap lead wire up to the the cone and wrap a bulb of lead wire making 3 or 4 turns. Cut the lead wire, and push bulb of wire up into the conehead to help keep the conehead in position. The 12 turns toward the hook bend help balance out the conehead so it planes out more when strip retreived.

3. Add a little longer than 1 hook shanks length marabou for the tail.

4. Tie in polar chenille, and wrap to the back of the conehead.

5. Tie off polar chenille.

6. Whip finish. (I usually whip finish twice on this one because the bushiness of the polar chenille doesn't allow the knot to show.

Also, I usually trim the polar chenille down a bit depending on how small of a streamer I'm tying. Usually trim down to a little longer than the hook gap in length.

Obviously can be tied in any size. Basically a bugger variation. I came up with this playing around one night, then found a version similar with some rubber legs tied in half way through the body. Can add any combination of stuff.

Usually just strip it in, but can twitch it in on the bottom, if no snags. I called it a black leech pattern, but probably could be dead drifted as a stonefly too.

Hope it catches ya a fish!

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Heres my pattern: Superior X legs (my style)

Hook: Gamakatzu long stone hook size 8-12 (10 for the swap)

Tail: pheaseant tail fibers

Body: Hares ear dubbing (olive for the swap)

Rib: Heavy gold wire

Wingcase: Turkey fiber

Legs: Rubber leg strips

Tie the fly similar to a hares ear, but tie on the legs parralel to the hook shank before tying in the wing case.

I'll post a pic of it sometime soon.

Tie the fly similar to a hares ear nymph,

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Getting away from Trout patterns, what would one recommend for Crappie and Sunfish? I have quite a few bead head Hares ear nymphs and Prince nymphs that I like for Panfish but am looking to expand my arsenal.


Corey Bechtold

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