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Rebels75

Shot selection

5 posts in this topic

Ok, this is the first time I've had a permit drawn for turkey season and we're going down to Caledonia in April. Can a person use lead shot anywhere they hunt, state or private land? Is it better to use Hevi-shot? I know shot can't be any bigger than 4's. If you can't tell, I'm really excited about this new experience and welcome any info. Thanks laugh.gif

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I'm not sure about the regulations as they pertain to turkey hunting with non-tox shot. Reason would suggest using a non-tox shot if hunting public land near waterway areas, but I'm not certain. Anyone else here?

As for what type/size shot to use, I think you'll get alot of different opinions out there. My guess is that these are because of:

-different performance of different shot in different guns with different chokes

-differing opinions as to how much "killing-power" one needs to kill a turkey at range

While there's alot of differences noted above, one thing that stays the same is that a good pattern trumps all. I typically see my best patterns with size #6 hevi-type shots. I have confidence in the ballistics and downrange killing power of hevi over lead, though I've killed many birds with the old copperplated-lead as well.

The thing that sells me with smaller shot sizes is that you have that many more pellets out there. IMO, an even-spread with as many pellets possible while still having enough energy downrange to pack a punch, is key in consistently killing these birds.

There is a strong misconception out there, that you need #4's to kill a bird past 30 yards. This is fueled by stories of monster gobblers people have rolled over the years, only to see them turn into a hurried speck on the horizon. These birds are tough, no doubt, and a #4 peice of shot hits harder than a #6. However, I'll take 15 #6's in the spine/brain area of a turkey over 5 #4's everytime. In other words, I put more stress on the number of pellets in the vitals, vs. size of pellets in the vitals.

I know folks who can't get #6's to pattern well in anything they shoot, so it's critical to pattern your gun to see what works best for you. Know your max. range, and never shoot at a bird past it. This gives you the confidence in knowing that the bird will go down as long as you line up the sights correctly.

Joel

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Thanks for the info. I've hunted for close to 40 years but this is my first hunt for turkey and I appreciate any info I get.

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3 1/2in. #5 makes them do back flips at 50 yards.

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I'm a heavy #6 myself. I also prefer to have more pellets than larger ones. Not because I don't pattern well, but I like my odds better. I think a lot of it comes down to personal preference.

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