Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
xedge2002

Grapes and Raisins and dogs

Recommended Posts

xedge2002    0
xedge2002

I got this in an email, don't know if it is true or not but figured someone on here would be able to provide some insight.

This week I had the first case in history of raisin toxicity

ever seen at MedVet. My patient was a 56-pound, 5 yr old male

neutered lab mix that ate half a canister of raisins sometime

between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM on Tuesday.

He started with vomiting, diarrhea and shaking about 1AM on

Wednesday but the owner didn't call my emergency service until 7AM.

I had heard somewhere about raisins AND grapes causing acute

Renal failure but hadn't seen any formal paper on the subject.

We had her bring the dog in immediately. In the meantime, I called

the ER service at MedVet, and the doctor there was like me - had

heard something about it, but....

Anyway, we contacted the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center

and they said to give IV fluids at 1 times maintenance and watch the

kidney values for the next 48-72 hours.

The dog's BUN (blood urea nitrogen level) was already at 32

(normal less than 27) and creatinine over 5 (1.9 is the high end of normal).

Both are monitors of kidney function in the bloodstream. We placed

an IV catheter and started the fluids. Rechecked the renal values at

5 PM and the BUN was over 40 and creatinine over 7 with no urine

production after a liter of fluids.

At the point I felt the dog was in acute renal failure and sent him

on to MedVet for a urinary catheter to monitor urine output overnight as

well as overnight care. He started vomiting again overnight at MedVet

and his renal values have continued to increase daily. He produced urine

when given lasix as a diuretic. He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications

and they still couldn't control his vomiting. Today his urine output

decreased again, his BUN was over 120, his creatinine was at 10, his phosphorus

was very elevated and his blood pressure, which had been staying around 150,

skyrocketed to 220.. He continued to vomit and the owners elected to

euthanize.

This is a very sad case - great dog, great owners who had no idea

raisins could be a toxin. Please alert everyone you know who has a

dog of this very serious risk. Poison control said as few as 7 raisins or

grapes could be toxic. Many people I know give their dogs grapes or raisins

as treats including our ex! - handler's. Any exposure should give rise to

immediate concern.

Laurinda Morris, DVM

Danville Veterinary Clinic

Danville , Ohio

Even if you don't have a dog, you might have friends who do.

This is worth passing on to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
311Hemi    0
311Hemi

Some Common Foods That Are Toxic to Dogs:

1. Raisins/Grapes

2. Caffeine

3. Raw Eggs

4. Raw Fish

5. Tobacco

6. Hops

7. Ibuprofin- common pain reliever

8. Xylitol- sweetener found in mints, candy and food.

9. Chocolate

10. Alcohol

11. Mushrooms

12. Onions/Garlic

13. Macadamia Nuts

14. Rising Bread Dough

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rip_Some_Lip    0
Rip_Some_Lip

Hmmm...I was always told a raw egg every once in a while was good for their coat. Glad I read this post. Thanks 311Hemi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fishroger    0
fishroger

where do you get this info? You might want to post the source. I feed my dog raw fish all the time with no ill affects and I know many other dogowners that do the same thing. Chocolate? Onions? why not tomatoes, peppers, any vegge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xedge2002    0
xedge2002

I had always heard that eggs were good for their coat too. Also we had a lab that would go and dig onions out of the garden all the time and it never seemed to hurt her. She lived to be 13.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xedge2002    0
xedge2002

Chocolate is toxic to most dogs, I have heard that from multiple sources including vets so that one I would definetly agree with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harmonica Bear    0
Harmonica Bear

Chocolate is definitely toxic to some (not every) dogs. I know grapes are as well. My dog died of renal failure last summer after the 4th. After the question was your dog around any antifreeze the next questions was could she have eaten any grapes over the weekend. I had never heard of the grape thing either. And no grapes was not the cause.

I thought an occasional egg was ok for a dog, too. I do cook it first, however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JollyT    0
JollyT

The problem is the amount of chocolate they will eat if allowed to. Chocolate has a chemical in it that will cause rapid heart rate and arythmia. In humans too. However, a 60 lb. human won't pull a one pound package off the counter and eat the whole thing. ooo.gif

Dogs livers and kidneys also seem to be less able to handle some chemicals humans have no problem with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IRISHSOBNO4    0
IRISHSOBNO4

my dog also digs up onions all the time. i was told by a vet in garrison that it was ok to give the dog raw eggs.

i would give them the broken ones when i pulled them from

the hen house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fishroger    0
fishroger

Checked out some websites about this. Raw fish-is actually raw salmon, a fluke found in raw salmon cause cause problems in dogs. Mushrooms, just like humans, dont eat mushrooms unless your 110% sure there safe, of course your lab eats anything and everything so you have to watch what they eat. Grapes and raisins- according to various websites the dogs affected ate between 1/2# and 2# of grapes or raisins, thats alot. Onions and garlic- again large amounts can cause sickness. All the websites said very large amounts of anything can cause toxicity. websites: vetinfo4dogs.com/dtoxin. dogbreedinfo.com/grapeandraisin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
311Hemi    0
311Hemi

peteducation.com is also another place to look.

Concerning raw eggs:

Because of the Biotin deficiency which develops from "chemically" coagulating the albumin. Albumin must be coagulated before it can be utilized. Cooking coagulates the albumin -- when given raw, it takes large amounts of Biotin to coagulate the albumin------------which can result in Biotin deficiency.

It recommended to cook them first. I am not a vet or canine nutrition expert....just posting what I have found. I have also read that many people feed raw eggs with no issues. My dogs don't have a need for eggs, except maybe during hunting season if they need more protein/fat (depending on what food they are on).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
uplander    0
uplander

Sometimes pets get into things and thats understandable........but most of the time you should stick to dog food and supplements made for dogs!!!!!!!!!!! The very occasional haburger after a hard day in the field should be O.K I would skip the fries......Thaks for the heads up about the grapes and rasins..... That's good to know with kids around..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gspman    0
gspman

Chocolate has theobromine in it which is toxic to dogs. Dark chocolate is more potent than milk chocolate. Giving your dog a hershey bar won't do much. If your dog gets into a 2 pound bag of dark chocolate chips you might have problems.

As for eggs, as long as you cook them you are okay.

Feed your dog dog food. If you want to substitute cooked burger, eggs, and rice once in a while that's fine. But they really only need dog food.

Dog food companies are trying to humanize dog foods now too. Complete with carrots, peas, broccoli and other veggies. It's more to cash in on naive pet owners than having a more healthy dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PikeBayCommanche    0
PikeBayCommanche

We are harvesting our vineyards right now and our dogs love to eat the fresh grapes that fall on the ground. None of them have ever had any problems. 3 labs no renal failure.

So thats the first time I have ever heard that they are toxic. My dad also is a PhD Masters in Animal Science and says he has never heard that. confused.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harmonica Bear    0
Harmonica Bear

I am sure there are arguements rebuting this as well. A quick yahoo search produced this.

Q. Are grapes and raisins really poisonous to pets?

From Janet Tobiassen Crosby, DVM,

Your Guide to Veterinary Medicine.

Originally thought to be an urban legend, it is now known that raisins and grapes are indeed toxic to dogs. The type of grape and the type of dog doesn't seem to matter, and the toxic amount may be a small serving to several ounces. Read this FAQ to learn what is known about this mystery toxin and to safeguard your pets from accidental posioning.

A. Some dogs naturally love eating raisins and grapes and will seek them out; from the pantry or growing in a vineyard. Pet owners have used raisins as a training treat, and some have used them as a "healthy" snack alternative for their dogs.

Toxicity

A computerized animal toxicity database helped veterinarians see a trend in 1989, noticing that in some cases of acute renal failure (sudden kidney failure) dogs shared a common history: the consumption of raisins or grapes just prior to the kidney failure. The type of grape or raisin doesn't seem to matter, and the amount consumed may be a single serving of raisins or a pound or more of grapes. (Raisins are much more concentrated.) Researchers are exploring the possibilities: a mycotoxin (fungal toxin), pesticide, herbicide or heavy metals, but thus far the actual toxin is unknown at this time.

Clinical Signs

Vomiting and jittery (hyperactive) behavior are seen immediately to within the first 24 hours after ingestion.

Diarrhea may also be seen, and the vomitus and feces may contain partially digested grapes or raisins. After 24 hours, the dog may be come anorexic, lethargic and depressed. Additionally the abdomen may be painful, the dog may stop drinking and urinating. Ultimately, the kidneys fail, and without aggressive treatment, many dogs will die.

Treatment

If the raisin or grape ingestion was 2 hours or less, the veterinarian will want to induce vomiting to rid the body of the toxin and then administer activated charcoal to absorb any remaining toxin. Aggressive intravenous (IV) fluid therapy is required to keep the kidneys in good health. Additional kidney medications may be indicated, depending on the patient.

If you suspect that your pet has consumed any amount of grapes or raisins, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Additional Resources

ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center

Animal Poison Hotline

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PikeBayCommanche    0
PikeBayCommanche

Huh.

My dogs eat them a lot right now during the harvest and have yet to see any of the above mentioned side effects.

If I could believe anything the most logical answer would be grapes that have a toxic pesticide or fungicide on them. That would for sure be a problem but we are an Organic vineyard so I don't use any of those harsh chemicals.

Don't know what to tell ya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xedge2002    0
xedge2002

I would agree it could be a chemical but it could also be a normal fungus/bacteria in the grapes that doesn't affect us but dogs lack the ability to kill it off when they eat it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PikeBayCommanche    0
PikeBayCommanche

I don't know. Think about all the fungus and other bacteria dogs eat.......dead animals, sticks, basically anything.

I am just a little skeptical about the overall "dangers" of grapes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BLACKJACK    3
BLACKJACK

I know my sisters cocker spaniel died after eating a pound of M&M's.

My two labs eat just about anything - tomatoes, corn, sunflower seeds, poop, (first they taste it and then they roll in it), dead things, apples, etc. Last night one came running with a half rotten head of cabbage from the compost pile and proceeded to lay down and eat it. She also likes wild plums, she actually seeks them out and eats them, lots are falling right now. I think part of it what they're used to and not in excess. I've let them eat whatever since they're pups, I only draw the line on dead and stinky, and bones, I don't want them splintering in their mouth.

And yes they get dog food twice a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • SkunkedAgain
      The public launch at The Landing on the west end stays open until the ice sets in, but they do pull the dock sometimes around the end of October / beginning of November.
    • KidMoe
      Just curious if people are finding fish moving into fall patterns yet or still finding them in more summer locations?  I've been finding good sized panfish in deeper water myself around more mid lake structure. Most of the lakes I've been on are still pretty green with algae and weeds. 
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Captain Acorn, I use Gamagatu  octopus hooks. Size 4 for crawlers and size 2 for minnows. Red, black, chartreuse, and pink , mostly red and black. I use orange and green glow soft beads at times. (Worked today!) Cliff
    • Barrington
      NOW BOOKING FOR THE 2018 ICE FISHING SEASON!!
      LIMITED SPOTS ARE AVAILABLE..   Barrington Lake camp will now be offering remote ice fishing for the very first time thanks to its unique train access. You can also come by ski-doo from the town of Savant Lake. Its a 30-45min ride. Ice fishing with us at Barrington r Camp will be one of the coolest fishing trips you ever experience! Pristine snow covered lakes in the rugged Canadian Shield. Remoteness! Where the fish are plentiful and tasty! During our ice fishing season, we use the main lodge for accommodations. The air tight wood stoves in every room keep you  toasty warm and the propane lights make it cozy and rustic. This is remote ice fishing at its best. At camp you will have a heated room, Wi-Fi, full kitchen with propane fridge and stove, a newly built heated outhouse, and electricity on demand to charge batteries and extra lights. A flat screen TV for hockey games is also available. We access numerous lakes by snowmobile, ATV and even snowshoes. We travel with portable ice huts to keep us mobile and on top of fish.  Water will be available through the lake but there will be no running water for showers. The fishing has been outstanding all summer long so why not extend it year round. Main species in the lake are walleye, northern, white fish, and some perch. There has been numerous 26"-30" walleye's caught on a weekly basis through out the summer. This camp and lake have been private up until this past summer. 90% of groups who came for the first time this year have already booked for next year. References are available.
      Limited spots available for ice-fishing. Only 2 rooms available in the winter months. You will have 1000's of acres of water at to your self.   ******4 Man Sunday to Monday Special $600/Person******
      Included in the package.. -Accommodations
      -Train tickets
      -Ice auger
      -Ice Shelter
      -Quad or Ski doo for traveling the late All you need is your equipment & Food. Our ice fishing packages are very flexible and can be customized to suit your requests. Come try one of our Northwestern Ontario winter getaways, ice fishing remote waters! The train departs either Armstrong Ontario north of Thunder Bay, or Sioux Look out Ontario 2 days a week. Its a 1.5 hour ride direct to camp from either direction. Dates can be re-arranged to suit your needs.
      Call or e-mail for more information.
      Tonnes of new reviews & references available from this year.
      Check out our website at www.barringtonlakecamp.com
      or our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Barringtonlake/ Jonathan & Lyndsey
      807-584-2202
      807-407-4202                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      807-407-3997
      You wont be disappointed!! No one has been yet!
    • Hoey
    • Captain Acorn
      I was up for a long weekend this past weekend. For us the only thing that was working leadcore with cranks 18-24fow looks of eaters but not one over 18" couldn't get the digging raps rigs or jog and minnow to go but I'm sure it's not far off caught about half of mine on cranks when I was turning and didn't seem to matter weather the pole was on the inside or outside 2.2 2.4 was our speed flicker shads and deep runner raps #5 and 7. Cliff what style and size of hook do u use for your minnow rigs? Any beads used? 
    • monstermoose78
      This weekend near grand marais on thursday and Friday the no see ems were out. A few skeets but once it cooled down the no see ems were gone. Fished a lake that known for horrible bugs and it was not bad.
    • monstermoose78
      I would trade my crossbow for normal bow any day
    • Wanderer
      That's correct.  For now.
    • FishinCT
      We did well today from 1-4pm on an underwater point. Finally found some fish in a semi-sheltered area. Last few days have been tough to control the small light boat with all the wind. Most caught on pink jigs in 21-30ft.  Cliff I did try the circle hook lindy today with the big minnow and nailed the first bite I had. Next 2 bites grabbed it hard but dropped it. Work in progress!