• GUESTS

    If You  want access  to member only forums on FM, You will need to Sign-in or  Sign-Up now .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member.

  • Join In - We Share Fishing Reports & Outdoor Information Here

     
      You know what we all love...

      The same things you do!!!! Share what you love & enjoy in the outdoors as well as thank those whose posts you 'appreciate.'

      Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
Gordie

Team 4=SPUR COLLECTORS

Recommended Posts

sticknstring

It's a closeup of a neat mount I was contemplating having done a few years ago. Fitting for turkey season I thought.

wood_box2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordie

that is a sweet mount

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mrklean

that thing is pretty sweet, nice action mount

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonBo

Very cool. You'd need a big spot to show that off wouldn't you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sticknstring

I'll just move my wife's full-strut mount to the storage room and proudly display mine in the den! grin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonBo

Oh yea, we believe that.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harvey lee

Thats a very nice mount.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nightcrawler

South Dakota, a great time was had by all/. 3 turkeys for 5 hunters. I was not one if them. seen a ton of turkeys, behind me , behind the bushes, in front of me,to far ,one hen in the face- (two feet), all kinds of fun action.

one morning saw two cougers going across a ridge, thought that was cool to see( brain---watch back). around noon a trolling grobbler goes behind me,give him 80yd head start. then spent 3 hrs trying to put the moves on him.he heads up this mountion, ha ,( brain- go up rock face beat him to top). 15 ft from top, stick head over ledge and see a this den,(brain- couger den-babys?)a noisey 15 ft i was on top of the ridge . goobler was 80 yds away moving out east and ME moving out south.

in all was a great hunt and a good time with Son,daughter-in-law and friends and other brain dead stories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordie

sounds like a great time along with the couger sighting. That would be cool.

Are you all done hunting or do you have a tag in Minn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sticknstring

Sounds like you had a great hunt 'crawler. Everything but squeezing the trigger. My cousin dropped a nice 25 lb'er this morning on the same farm I'll be hunting in 3 weeks. It's going to be a looong wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rundrave

this has to be longest day of work ever. I am swamped but getting anxious for my first turkey hunt ever! I cant wait anymore, we were going to leave early early tommorrow morning but figured I wouldnt sleep tonight anyway so were just going to roll in tonight and salvage any sleep we can at the cabin.

We are heading west to Gregory county and will be hunting near the river and hopefully fill both my tags. We plan on being there until Sunday. I am not sure if I get the chance to shoot 2 birds right away if I will. If I do I will spend the rest of the time fishing.

Wish me luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nightcrawler

Rundrave good luck and have a great trip.

I have the black hills lic.good for the whole season but is a 12 hr trip from here to go back. still have Mn. H season, was good for me last year.

deicded to pass the NY.trip

this year so gives the iron knees a rest till the H season, .

go get them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordie

this has to be longest day of work ever. I am swamped but getting anxious for my first turkey hunt ever! I cant wait anymore, we were going to leave early early tommorrow morning but figured I wouldnt sleep tonight anyway so were just going to roll in tonight and salvage any sleep we can at the cabin.

We are heading west to Gregory county and will be hunting near the river and hopefully fill both my tags. We plan on being there until Sunday. I am not sure if I get the chance to shoot 2 birds right away if I will. If I do I will spend the rest of the time fishing.

Wish me luck!

Sleepless nights long days with your back up agaisnt a tree man I love turkey hunting Good luck rundrave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sticknstring

Good luck rundrave! I can't take it anymore - I just bought my permit and leaving for Nebraska! Have to be back for Sunday's Twin's game so it'll be a quick trip. Weather looked good and a baby in May could keep me out of the woods in for MN season. I need to get in the woods. Wish me luck boys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonBo

Good luck Stick! I happen to know how easy it is to get rid of those Twins tickets if you want to stay a bit longer. wink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordie

GOOD LUCK stick put one on the board

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nightcrawler

aaaaaah, the cost of turkey fever.

if stick left last nite he should be going to bed tonite with the turkeys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sticknstring

Well boys, I'm back and happy to report I had an exciting and successful hunt in Nebraska! Forgot my camera this morning - report and pictures to follow. Spur Collectors unofficially on the board!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonBo

Way to go Stick! Looking fwd to hearing the story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mrklean

nice job stick way to put us on the board

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordie

Can I get a BIG WOO HOO for sticknstring grin

way go stick congrats on the bird cant wait to see the pics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rundrave

Well I hate to say but after 3 hard days of hunting I am still birdless and with my schedule will more than likely not make it out again this year.

Here is a recap from my first ever experience hunting the almighty turkey. Just to set the setting, we were hunting on some public land along the Missouri river in Gregory county South Dakota.

Friday morning we started hunting around 5:45am, we walked no more than 100yds from the parking lot and made our first call. We had a tom respond to us immediately! We made our way through the dark in attempt to get as close as we could without him knowing we were there. We hid in some trees about 50 yards away from this bird. As daylight emerged we could see the turkey in full strut all fanned out and he was responding to every call we made. (I think this is when I first realized how fun this could be) This bird was slowly making his way closer to us. With my partner calling to hopefully distract the bird, I attempted to sneak around another ridge hoping to be able to pop over the top and have a shot at him. I could hear him still talking so I knew exactly where I needed to come back over the ridge. As I was getting ready to come over the top, I just happened to sneak up on a deer and she bolted on a run and in doing so alerted the turkey who opted to make a run for cover as well.

That hour of events turned out to be the only real action the rest of Friday. As we were calling in a bird later that afternoon I had a hen come with in 10 yards but I opted to pass on her, in hopes of shooting a tom. We saw several birds later that day but just couldn’t get them close enough for a shot. I did attempt a really long shot that day, but after counting how many paces it was after I shot, the bird had been well out of range. I don’t even want to know how many miles we walked but we hunted non stop from sun up to sun down. We were literally out there all day, and I was exhausted. However I was able to take a few naps out on a couple hills sides, and man that was great!

Saturday we started at the same time, same place in the dark. Made a call and got a Tom to respond right away again. We learned our mistake from the first day, and the guy I was with opted to go a different path than I did. I stayed and kept calling and watched as he got closer and closer to us. I wasn’t sure exactly where the other guy set up but I was able to call that bird with in 10yds of him and he blasted him. Finally a bird in the bag, what a great way to start the day and I as a rookie was able to contribute to a successful downed bird.

Well funny story is we didn’t want to carry the bird the rest of the day or go back to the truck so we decided to hide it in tree and keep hunting. Well long story short we hunted the rest of the morning and never saw or heard a bird. We hunted up to around 11am then made our way back to the tree which we thought was easy enough to pick out. Well we had a heck of a time finding that very same tree again, but after a while we eventually found the tree and the bird. I can only imagine how foolish we looked during the searching.

We went back out that afternoon and hunted again until dark and never saw or heard a bird. It was very windy that day, so I don’t think they were able to hear our calls, and we were not able to hear theirs. The wind also would have made it easier to sneak up on them, but we never located any way. After all the excitement we had right way both days started to make for some long days and I was beginning to get frustrated. I still had hope knowing we could start Sunday (our last day out) and hoped we would have the same success as the previous 2 mornings.

So Sunday we set out with the same plan as the previous 2 days, only that spot didn’t hold any birds (just my luck) so we set off in search of some others. The 2 of us decided to split up and meet at the top of the next ridge over in a couple hours. We both set foot in different paths hoping to be able to meet up on the next ridge. I hiked North to the bottom between the 2 ridges and kept calling as I went while he went south. Finally I was able to get a tom to respond and he was really close! I immediately located a spot that would provide plenty of cover, but leave me several shooting lanes. For over an hour I called this bird and the longer I called the closer and more vocal he became. Then I began to hear a hen call, and each time that hen called I could tell the tom was moving closer to that call, and then come back to me when I called.

Ironically I had to send a txt(is that cheating?) to the other guy I was hunting with, as I had a sneaky suspicion it was him. It turns out it was, and for the next hour we probably sent each other 50 txt msg’s trying to locate where each of us were, and if either of us could see the bird. The tom pretty much stopped talking so we decided that one of us should try to stalk and get closer to the bird. I made my way along as slowly and quietly as I could to where I believed the bird was. At one point I called and got him to respond and I was very very close. All it was merely 20ft that separated me and this bird. I could hear him snorting, and moving around and beating his wings. Unfortunately the brush and trees were just too thick for me to get a visual on him so I just stayed still. After a while I tried to call and I no longer heard anything. He was gone and after meeting up with my partner he told me that he had spotted bird but it didn’t stick around after I made that last call so he must have been onto us. We hunted a few more hours unable to find or locate any more birds and we both were exausted so we called it a day.

So that’s how my first turkey hunting expedition went. Of our group of 7 guys, 9 birds were taken, 5 were shot on private land (paid to hunt $$$$) and 4 were taken on public. Of the 4 taken on public 2 of them hens were basically shot not far from the road which I neglected to do. In all honesty I feel that the guys who put the least amount of effort in had the most succuss. But I am gonna take what I learned from this weekend and apply it all next year. So hopefully next year will yield better luck, but I definitely learned a lot and had a great time.

Hope you enjoyed and sorry I didn’t put any points on the board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sticknstring

Great stories rundrave - sounds like you had an exciting hunt. That's turkey hunting - some times it can be easy and others, they'll make a fool of even the best of us and can be darn right frustrating. Sounds like it wasn't from lack of effort! Hopefully you gained some useful knowledge and were infected with the turkey bug. My first trip out to the black hills a few springs ago was much of the same, plenty of action, lots of effort, but in the end - we came home birdless. A memorable hunt, nonetheless. Thanks for sharing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dukhnt

Thanks for getting us on the board stick. Congrats! I am getting the itch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordie

Great story and sounds like you had a ton of fun rundrave hope you can get out another time but if you dont well theres next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • leech~~
      You took this with a cell phone?  What one do you have? Great shot. 
    • papadarv
      Live north side Coon Lake, Anoka Co. Bear cought on Ring month ago 1/4 mile south of Coon Lake on Lexington Ave.  
    • mtheis
      I have version 8 as well.  1' contours.  Where I fish it has proven to be extremely accurate.  
    • Kow
      Hi looking for anyone who is interested in trying a new fishing app that allows you to measure, weigh and track fish with your phone. If you are interested in being one of the first people to help shape and build this tool please visit https://www.weighin.io and sign up. Thank you. 
    • tarpon6
      It was West of Canfield. The East end of Comet was behind me.
    • Rick
      The Department of Natural Resources invites visitors to Mille Lacs Kathio State Park to join members of the Minnesota Archaeological Society on Sept. 28 for Archaeology Day. Attendees will learn about the region’s 9,000 years of human history, and how this contributed to the designation of the park as a National Historic Landmark. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the park picnic area. “Demonstrations, activities and displays will advance everyone’s knowledge of the park and Minnesota history, no matter what their age,” said Kris Erickson, park manager. “The park’s beautiful fall colors will offer an added perk.” During the day, visitors can: Watch how “flint knapping” transforms a piece of stone into a tool. See the way prehistoric pottery was created. Observe an excavation where artifacts were discovered. Examine a spear, and watch a spear-throwing demonstration. Learn to shoot an arrow with instructors from the Archery in the Park program. Minnesota Archaeological Society publications as well as books and pamphlets from the Minnesota Historical Society, Maritime Heritage Minnesota, St. Cloud State University and other sources will be available. Archeology films will run continuously in the Interpretive Center. The DNR is sponsoring the event, along with the Minnesota Archaeological Society and St. Cloud State University. There is no charge for Archaeology Day activities. A vehicle permit is required to enter Minnesota state parks. Vehicle permits may be purchased at the park office. The cost of a daily permit is $7. An annual permit, which allows entry into all state parks for one year from the date of purchase, is $35. Mille Lacs Kathio State Park is located 8 miles north of Onamia, and 14 miles south of Garrison on U.S. Highway 169. For more information, call the park at 320-532-3523. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Minnesotans interested in helping the Department of Natural Resources determine how Game and Fish Fund dollars are spent now have through Friday, Oct. 11, to apply to serve on a review committee.  Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for many of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $110 million is deposited into this fund annually. The DNR needs at least 12 people to serve on the fisheries oversight and wildlife oversight committees (a minimum of 6 for each committee). About half of the current members’ terms expire on Saturday, Dec. 14. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund report in detail. People who want to serve should have a strong interest in natural resource management, how it is funded, financial review and working together. The goal is for the committee to have members from across the state with diverse perspectives and backgrounds. DNR Commissioner Sarah Strommen will appoint committee members for two-year terms. Applications are available on the DNR website, along with more information about the fund, expenditure reports and oversight committee reports. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Counties collect Payment in Lieu of Taxes for state-owned land not subject to property tax Minnesota’s 87 counties are the beneficiaries of $35.9 million in state payments that help support public lands.  The state’s Department of Revenue recently distributed annual payments for Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), a property tax relief program that offsets tax revenues not collected on public lands. Counties have received PILT payments annually since 1979 in place of property taxes on 5.6 million acres of state-managed lands and 2.8 million acres of county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Money for the payments comes from the state’s general fund. Every county in Minnesota has public lands within its borders and receives an annual PILT payment. In July, counties received anywhere from $21,443 in Red Lake County up to $3,792,842 in St. Louis County. “PILT is an important and consistent revenue source for counties, but the benefits of public lands for Minnesotans go far beyond these annual payments,” said Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Sarah Strommen. “Public lands support local economies through timber and mineral production, provide space for outdoor recreation and tourism, create habitat for wildlife, and help provide clean air and water.” The state makes PILT payments on public lands including state parks and forests, scientific and natural areas and wildlife management areas, school trust lands, Consolidated-Conservation lands as well as county-managed tax-forfeited lands. Even lands that could never be developed and placed on the tax rolls are included in PILT calculations used to compensate counties. Payment rates vary according to land type and range from $2 per acre, to three-quarters of 1 percent of appraised value. Payment for Lake Vermilion Soudan Underground Mine State Park is assessed at 1.5 percent of the appraised value of the land. A breakdown of PILT payments for each county is posted on the Minnesota Department of Revenue website. More information about Minnesota’s public land portfolio, PILT payments, and a brief history of major public land transactions is available on the DNR’s public lands page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is reminding lake property owners to carefully check boats and trailers, docks and lifts, and all other water-related equipment for invasive species when removing equipment for seasonal storage.  This is important, as several new zebra mussel confirmations in recent years were initially reported by people removing docks, boats and boat lifts. “These late summer/early fall confirmations are the result of Minnesotans being more vigilant and checking for invasive species when taking equipment out of the water,” said DNR Invasive Species Unit supervisor Heidi Wolf. It’s especially important to follow Minnesota’s law and keep docks and boat lifts out of the water for at least 21 days before putting them into another body of water. This state law is central to the training DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses receive. Anyone transporting a dock or lift from the adjacent shoreline property to another location for storage or repair may need a permit, to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. The DNR recommends these steps for lake property owners: Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period. Hire DNR-permitted lake service provider businesses to install or remove boats, docks, lifts and other water-related equipment. These businesses have attended training on Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws and many have experience identifying and removing invasive species. Contact your area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if you think you have discovered an invasive species that has not already been confirmed in your lake. More information is available on the aquatic invasive species page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Watching the sun rise over a marsh is an awe-inspiring experience, a memory bank deposit that for many duck hunters is as valuable as the number of birds they bag. Yet, every year some duck hunters find themselves in bad situations, the result of falls into cold water, mishaps with their firearms, or other incidents that may forever cloud what’s supposed to be an enjoyable experience.  As Minnesota’s waterfowl hunting season gets underway Saturday, Sept. 21, Department of Natural Resources conservation officers remind hunters to ensure their hunting and safety gear is in good condition before heading afield. Once they’re hunting, adhering to the key tenets of safe firearms handling is the best way to reduce the risk they’ll be involved in what could be a life-changing incident. “Safe hunts are successful hunts, but they don’t just happen on their own,” said Jon Paurus, DNR Enforcement Division education program coordinator. “It’s up to hunters to put themselves in safe situations.” For those who use boats during their hunt, that means thinking of themselves as boaters. Wearing a life jacket is the best way to avoid drowning. Colder water this time of year increases the likelihood of cold water shock and hypothermia. Duck hunters should tell someone else where they’re going and when they plan to return, and have a communication device such as a cell phone or radio along with them. Overloaded boats also are susceptible to capsizing or swamping, so it’s important to pack only the gear that’s necessary and distribute it as evenly as possible. Each year, duck hunters also are involved in firearms-related incidents that lead to injury or death. The three most common factors are careless handling, not knowing the safe zone of fire and not being sure of what’s beyond the target. By following the four tenets of safe firearms handling, hunters can avoid most firearms and hunting-related incidents: Treat each firearm as if it is loaded. Always control the muzzle of the firearm. Be sure of the target and what’s beyond. Keep finger off the trigger and outside the trigger guard until ready to shoot. ### Discuss below - to view set the hook here.