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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
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Krebber

Anchors Away ... and away ... and away ... and ....

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Krebber

OK, This year I got a new (at least for me) 17-ft/80hp Skeeter tiller. For my bobber fishing on rocks I purchased an anchor (brand name rhymes with Rainy.) It supposedly good for boats up 22 feet. Here's my deal: I can't get the dang thing to hold. It just skips across the bottom. I tried lots of rope, short rope, high angle, low angle, etc. It just would not grab. In my previous rig, I had no problems with similar anchor. Any tips? Is it operator error? Is there a trick you're supposed to learn at anchor school? Or should I try a different brand/size? Any help is appreciated.

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Valv

Do you have a chain attached to anchor ? I know many need at least 2ft of chain before rope.

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icehousebob

I agree. Two feet minimum. Three feet is better, especially with wind or current. Good heavy chain.

Valv, there's a rumor going around that you're a grandfather. Who started that??

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Valv

Bob,

yes my son started that rumor, and it has been confirmed by few, his girlfriend agrees (yes, I said girlfriend, let's don't go there please.... mad.gif )

Then my oldest daughter (married cool.gif) has started another "rumor" I'll be twice grandpa in august....

Talking about making a 45yo feel old..... frown.gif

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Deitz Dittrich

as others have stated... some good chain to help it bite and more rope. THe more rope you let out the better chance it will bite as well.

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Ufatz

Do not understand what type anchor you have, but the basic message you are getting is correct. And to become didactic for a moment let me add: the basic combination of anchor etc. is called "ground tackle" When you are paying out more "rope" it is actually referred to as "scope". A "rope" becomes a "line" when it is used in ground tackle OR for other purposes. A simple formula for anchoring is a six-to-one ratio or scope for each foot (or fathom) of depth.

Put six feet of heavy chain to your anchor, with the proper shackle at each end, then the anchor line. Always tie off the "bitter end" of the anchor line to your boat. Slowly lower the anchor. Only a dumb a-- tosses his anchor over the side, thus producing the strong potential for fouling the anchor before it ever hits bottom.

Now.....pick on me if you must, but I am HONESTLY trying to help you landlubbers! grin.gif

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BobT

I don't really understand this. How does the chain improve the anchor holding? Doesn't the anchor hold by the angle of attack? If adding the chain only adds weight, why not just get a heavier anchor? Does it require any particular size/type of chain?

Bob

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Slyster

The chain helps it lay properly to grab the bottom.

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Ralph Wiggum

The chain does 2 things:

1) Helps the anchor land the correct way and keeps it at that angle

2) Acts as a "shock absorber" in the sense that when you are bobbing in waves, the tugging on your line will pull your chain and leave your anchor planted. With just an anchor, each time you bob, it will pull the anchor out of it's hold (unless it's really stuck).

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Ufatz

The sole purpose of the chain is to help the anchor lay over and bite the bottom. It is best used with a Danforth type (fluked) anchor. It will only marginally help a musroom type anchor. Do some quick research on anchor types to get aquainted with what you NEED for where you fish. Most folks in this part of the world, assuming little 16' 20' boats, don't need a whole lot of anchor....IF it is used properly.

You're welcome. tongue.gif

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BobT

Thanks for the education. Sounds plausible. Why is it less effective with mushroom styles? Seems that it might work well there too to help them stay tipped over as you bob up and down.

I have a river anchor which is similar to a mushroom but I might have to give this idea a shot.

Bob

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