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Krebber

Anchors Away ... and away ... and away ... and ....

11 posts in this topic

OK, This year I got a new (at least for me) 17-ft/80hp Skeeter tiller. For my bobber fishing on rocks I purchased an anchor (brand name rhymes with Rainy.) It supposedly good for boats up 22 feet. Here's my deal: I can't get the dang thing to hold. It just skips across the bottom. I tried lots of rope, short rope, high angle, low angle, etc. It just would not grab. In my previous rig, I had no problems with similar anchor. Any tips? Is it operator error? Is there a trick you're supposed to learn at anchor school? Or should I try a different brand/size? Any help is appreciated.

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Do you have a chain attached to anchor ? I know many need at least 2ft of chain before rope.

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I agree. Two feet minimum. Three feet is better, especially with wind or current. Good heavy chain.

Valv, there's a rumor going around that you're a grandfather. Who started that??

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Bob,

yes my son started that rumor, and it has been confirmed by few, his girlfriend agrees (yes, I said girlfriend, let's don't go there please.... mad.gif )

Then my oldest daughter (married cool.gif) has started another "rumor" I'll be twice grandpa in august....

Talking about making a 45yo feel old..... frown.gif

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as others have stated... some good chain to help it bite and more rope. THe more rope you let out the better chance it will bite as well.

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Do not understand what type anchor you have, but the basic message you are getting is correct. And to become didactic for a moment let me add: the basic combination of anchor etc. is called "ground tackle" When you are paying out more "rope" it is actually referred to as "scope". A "rope" becomes a "line" when it is used in ground tackle OR for other purposes. A simple formula for anchoring is a six-to-one ratio or scope for each foot (or fathom) of depth.

Put six feet of heavy chain to your anchor, with the proper shackle at each end, then the anchor line. Always tie off the "bitter end" of the anchor line to your boat. Slowly lower the anchor. Only a dumb a-- tosses his anchor over the side, thus producing the strong potential for fouling the anchor before it ever hits bottom.

Now.....pick on me if you must, but I am HONESTLY trying to help you landlubbers! grin.gif

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I don't really understand this. How does the chain improve the anchor holding? Doesn't the anchor hold by the angle of attack? If adding the chain only adds weight, why not just get a heavier anchor? Does it require any particular size/type of chain?

Bob

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The chain helps it lay properly to grab the bottom.

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The chain does 2 things:

1) Helps the anchor land the correct way and keeps it at that angle

2) Acts as a "shock absorber" in the sense that when you are bobbing in waves, the tugging on your line will pull your chain and leave your anchor planted. With just an anchor, each time you bob, it will pull the anchor out of it's hold (unless it's really stuck).

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The sole purpose of the chain is to help the anchor lay over and bite the bottom. It is best used with a Danforth type (fluked) anchor. It will only marginally help a musroom type anchor. Do some quick research on anchor types to get aquainted with what you NEED for where you fish. Most folks in this part of the world, assuming little 16' 20' boats, don't need a whole lot of anchor....IF it is used properly.

You're welcome. tongue.gif

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Thanks for the education. Sounds plausible. Why is it less effective with mushroom styles? Seems that it might work well there too to help them stay tipped over as you bob up and down.

I have a river anchor which is similar to a mushroom but I might have to give this idea a shot.

Bob

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