Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
tearin' lips

Spiney Waterflea.

2 posts in this topic

I just did a post on this in the kabetogama forum. I feel that it is relevent inforation and interesting for all the people who browse this forum to read...so I figured I would make the post on here as well.

I made this post under grassy bay & little trout but I feel that is is relevent information and needs its own post.

Though the decision of the Park is necessary for the prevention of the spiney waterflea it will only help slow the spread of this invasive species...not stop it.

Here are some facts.

The spiney waterflea has been predicted to arrive in the great lakes via shipping vessels in 1984. Scientist predict that the species "jumped ship" in the european waters of the caspian sea or in the harbors of great britain.

1) The spiney waterfleas eggs can survive in a terrestrial atmosphere for 5-7 days.

2) The eggs can survive extreme PH and temperature ranges. Eggs that have been studied in the labs here at UMD can survive at at Acidic ph of 2.5-3.0 and at a basic level of 10.0-11.0. For those who aren't familiar with ph levels a acidic level of 3 is equal to the acidity of vinegar and a basic level of 10 is just shy of ammonia.

3) The spiney waterflea can spread via many vectors. Fishing equipment is just one of the ways. It can also migrate to other areas via current, wind, and wildlife.

4) A female spiney waterflea can produce as many as 10 offspring every two weeks. Waterflea are asexual organisms, so this poses a great threat. As temperatures plummet in autumn the not yet hatched eggs fall to the bottom of the lake and lie dormant until late may or early june of the next year. This is the start up offspring that contributes to the next generation of water flea.

4) Females will always produce eggs as long as the water temperature is agreeable and there is an abundance of food.

The major threat of the waterflea is competition for resources. The waterflea is extremely efficient when it comes to devouring zooplankton and will comsume as many as 20 zooplankton a day. This poses a threat as they are directly competing with our small gamefish populations for food. And due to their spiney tail it renders them inedible by the small gamefish species.

flea2.jpg

Currently we are not sure what will be the achilles' heel for this organism. We know that chlorine will effectively kill the organism and its eggs almost instantly. However, we cannot treat a large body of water with chlorine as it poses threats to the remainder of the aquatic populations. As with anything knowledge is key to stopping the spread of the waterflea. Eventually something will be found to stop it, but until then it is up to us outdoorsmen and outdoorswomen to slow the spread of the organism, hence the necessity for VNP to try and stop/slowdown the spread to interior lakes.

Just figured everyone here should have the knowledge to help prevent the spread of the waterflea. The best thing to do is to wash your boat with either a high pressure washer or some sort of acidic based boat cleaner if you have been in a body of water known to be infested with the spiney waterflea. This will help eliminate the dispersal to our thousands of lakes in Minnesota.

I could write all day about information of the waterflea, patterns of dispersal and why it has populated only select waters, but this is the most relevent and useful information for all of us sportsmen to use.

Take Care Guys and Good Luck Fishing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just went to a seminar this AM on this creature that covered most of what Bill just posted. It would be wise to review the 2007 fishing regs (pgs. 67-72) regarding regulations pertaining to invasive species. The DNR website has additional information also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • skibass
      We talked to a guy who did very well in 16 FOW by Frontier on Monday. Also heard from a group who did well near Birchdale (not sure on depth).  Our best luck was in 21-25 FOW
    • megofishing
      I am planning on kayaking and fishing the Cannon River this season--between Cannon Falls and Hwy 61. I just want to know if the current is generally swift or lazy, i.e., can I paddle BACK to my entrance spot or do you  need to drift downstream and do the two vehicle thing. I understand it may depend on how low or high the river is at any given time, but in general, when things are 'normal', can you paddle back with little difficulty?
    • maxpower117
      I'll keep it short and simple. The causes of boom and bust on Mille Lacs.    1. Improperly managed slot limits. Too many large fish are allowed in the lake.  2. Netting during spawn. Poor spawning success.    The recent years of high catch rates rates indicate a good 2013 year class but most importantly it is a red flashing light for anyone paying attention. High catch rates are a result of good population AND low or decreasing forage. I put AND in caps because fish won't bite like they have  when they're not hungry.    Cut down that year class class before it's too late. I give it 2 more summers before another crash is inevitable.    Round and round we go, where it stops, nobody knows. 
    • megofishing
      After using most of the brands you've mentioned, I absolutely love Lunkerhunt frogs...real lifelike, and don't seem to fill up with water as much as the others. They also hold up really well--caught some pike and bowfin without them getting destroyed. I have been using the "Croaker" color exclusively, but definitely picking up some other patterns. They also make a popper frog which is great if you want to make a little more noise.
    • megofishing
      I agree with AlwaysFishing--you can come down in line weight for braid if you're just straight up bass fishing. I personally like 30lb if there are a lot of toothy critters around. I use 50-60lb when going after pike and muskie. Have you ever tried fireline for your spinning rod? When jigging, wacky worming, etc., I use 8-12lb fireline exclusively--you can feel EVERYTHING and no stretch is an added bonus.