Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

DNR News Release: Boaters reminded to help stop aquatic hitchhikers (2007-05-08)

1 post in this topic

A friendly reminder for all the boaters out there (from the DNR website).

Boaters reminded to help stop aquatic hitchhikers (2007-05-08)

With the start of the 2007 boating and fishing season approaching, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is asking boaters and anglers to keep up the good work in minimizing the spread of aquatic invasive species.

"The continuing spread of zebra mussels and the discovery of New Zealand mudsnails in Minnesota have us especially concerned," said Jay Rendall, DNR invasive species program coordinator. "The potential to spread aquatic invasive species increases each year and we need Minnesotans to continue with their high level of action."

Zebra mussels were discovered a few years ago in the Brainerd area and New Zealand mudsnails were recently found for the first time in the Duluth harbor.

By taking a few simple steps when leaving a lake or river, boaters and anglers can do their part to help stop the spread of aquatic hitchhikers such as Eurasian watermilfoil and zebra mussels in the state's water bodies. Those steps include removing all aquatic plants from boats and trailers and emptying water from live wells and bait containers.

Those who leave lakes and rivers the DNR has listed as infested waters need to be especially careful, Rendall said. Anglers who have live bait and want to keep it for another time should drain any infested water from the bait container and replace it with tap or spring water. Signs are posted at public access points to identify infested waters. A complete list of infested waters is available at

Rendall said boaters should also remember to dispose of unwanted live bait including worms and minnows in the trash rather than dumping them in the lakes and woods.

The DNR is continuing to use the national "Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers!" logo to remind boaters and anglers to take precautions. It is likely people will see the icon and messages in a variety of places this year including billboards, gas pump toppers, newspapers and on outdoor banners. Signs at public accesses, reminders from DNR watercraft inspectors, radio and television ads, and public service announcements will also be used to reach boaters this summer.

"Precautions should now be part of the routine for boaters," Rendall said. "These simple actions help boaters comply with the state laws that prohibit the transport of aquatic plants, zebra mussels, and other prohibited invasive species."

Last year, DNR biologists found 13 additional waters infested with Eurasian watermilfoil, bringing the total number of infested water bodies in the state to 190. Inland waters known to be infested with zebra mussels include Lake Ossawinnamakee and Rice Lake near Brainerd, Mille Lacs Lake, and Lake Zumbro north of Rochester. The Mississippi River from its confluence with the Pine River down to the Iowa border is also on the infested waters list.

More information about aquatic invasive species and a list of infested waters can be found in the 2007 Minnesota Fishing Regulations booklet.

The Minnesota Legislature directed the DNR to establish the Invasive Species Program in 1991 to address problems caused by aquatic invasive species. The program is responsible for preventing introductions, curbing their spread and managing invasive species of aquatic plants and wild animals.

Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Posts

    • leech~~
      Bahahaha, on Black Friday! Some guy must of come up with this idea? Good luck getting my wife to go!
    • Hoey
      My wife and I fished Friday and Saturday.  Friday we got out around noon, fished shallow rocks (15 to 22ft), mid-depth reef (15 to 28ft), and shallow sand flats (8 to 20ft).  Bite was slow to non-existent, wind was strong and fierce at 18 to 24mph.  Boat control was tough and we ended the day about 4pm.  Told my wife the sacrifice was not worth the excitement.   Saturday was a different story.  Calm with some sun.  Got out by 10am and started out fishing shore rocks (15 to 28ft) and picked up a couple.  Around noon moved to deeper reefs and bang we found fish, nice ones too.  We were trolling very slowly, i.e. 0.1 to 0.3 mph until we marked and caught fish.  Then we'd anchor up on them until the bite went away.  Ended the day 3 short of our walleye/sauger limit.   Talked with others indicating the bite on Thursday was very good, Friday was tough, and Saturday was a bit better.  We took the boat to the dealer for YE service, so we are done for the year. ...oh and got all three snowmobiles started too.  This was a first.
    • james_walleye
      Ohio we were using 3/8
    • Rick
      Entry fees at all 75 Minnesota state parks and recreation areas to be waived the day after Thanksgiving

      Smith and DNR encourage all Minnesotans to get outdoors and explore Minnesota’s parks and trails  Following the success of last year’s Free Park Friday, Lt. Gov. Tina Smith is encouraging all Minnesotans to include outdoor activity as part of their family festivities over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. As added incentive, Smith announced that entry fees at all 75 Minnesota state parks and recreation areas will be waived on Friday, Nov. 25.    Smith, who has set a goal of visiting all 75 Minnesota state parks and recreation areas, said she intends to work another state park visit into her schedule on Free Park Friday. “In my travels around Minnesota, I visit Minnesota state parks and recreation areas as often as I can,” she said. “We have one of the finest park and trail systems in the country, and spending time in nature is the best way I know to get some exercise, relax and refresh with family and friends. I want as many Minnesotans as possible to enjoy a free day in the parks after Thanksgiving.” This year marks the 125th anniversary of the Minnesota state parks and trails system. The celebration has brought record crowds out to explore Minnesota’s most beautiful locations. Through the end of September, one-day parks and trails permit sales were up 6 percent, year-round permit sales were up 8 percent and overnight stays were up 6 percent over last year, according to the Department of Natural Resources. “As a way to help celebrate the 125th anniversary of Minnesota state parks and trails, we’re encouraging visitors to see if they can go a total of 125 miles by bike, boot or boat by the end of 2016,” said Erika Rivers, director of the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division. “Free Park Friday will provide an opportunity to add to your mileage, whether you’re near the end of the challenge or just getting started.” Those who log 125 miles will receive a limited-edition sticker and can post their photo in an online Finishers Gallery. Minnesota state parks are open 365 days a year from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. and feature more than 1,000 miles of hiking trails through the state’s hardwoods, prairies and pinelands. In addition to hiking a favorite park, visitors and families can participate in naturalist-led programs, search for wildlife and even participate in the DNR’s “Call of the Wildflowers” geocaching adventure. To learn more about Minnesota’s 75 state parks and trails and to plan your “Free Park Friday” trip, visit the state parks page. For more information, visit the Free Park Friday page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Hunters are reminded to register deer before processing, before antlers are removed and within 48 hours after taking the animal, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  “Every hunter who registers their deer is providing important information and playing a critical role in our ability to scientifically manage deer populations,” said Adam Murkowski, DNR big game program leader. “Deer can be registered with a phone call, online or in person, with the exception of southeastern Minnesota during the firearms seasons, where in-person registration will be required.” Before registering a deer, hunters must validate their site tag. The validated tag must be attached to the deer when the deer is placed on a motor vehicle or an ATV, a vehicle or a trailer being towed by an ATV or brought into a camp, yard or other place of habitation. Phone registration
      Register deer via phone by calling 888-706-6367. Directions are printed on each deer hunting license. Have a pen or permanent marker ready. A confirmation number will be given; it must be written on the license and site tag. Internet registration
      Register deer via internet on the online license sales page. Directions will be similar to phone registration, and a confirmation number must be written on the license and site tag. In-person registration
      When phone or internet registration is not possible, hunters must take their deer to a big-game registration station. The person whose name appears on the license must be present at the registration station with their deer. They will receive a big-game possession tag that must be attached to the hind leg, ear or antler where the site tag was attached. A list of all stations organized by city and county is available at any DNR wildlife office or on the deer hunting season page. In-person registration will be required in deer permit areas 339 to 349, an area that includes nearly all the 300 series permit areas, during the 3A and 3B firearms deer seasons while the DNR samples deer for chronic wasting disease (CWD). More information on CWD sampling and registration locations is on the chronic wasting disease management page. In all areas, hunters are allowed to transport deer out of the permit area where the deer were taken before registering the deer. However, during registration, the hunter must use the permit area number where the deer was harvested; using the wrong deer permit area for registration is illegal. Registration instructions for all methods are available on the mandatory deer registration page. Through registration, hunters provide important information on deer, an animal that is significant not only ecologically, but also socially and economically in Minnesota. Hunting and wildlife watching generate more than $1.3 billion in annual economic impact in the state. Although deer populations vary in density from place to place and year to year and are influenced by the severity of winter weather, the DNR strives to manage deer for the benefit of everyone through habitat management, regulated hunting seasons, research and planning. Deer registration is one of many ways that citizens help. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.