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PEATMOSS

Opener observations

10 posts in this topic

Just a few thoughts on Opening weekend, not trying to be preachy.Hoping everyone has a great time and gets along.

1-Up in the greater Winni area, there are numerous spots where people fish from shore. Areas like the Cutfoot fishing pier,Williams Narrows and assorted bridges throughout the area draw lots of attention from some locals.By and large most of these people do not own boats and are taking advantage of one of the few times that they have to actually catch walleyes from shore.I'm thinking that those of us with boats should count our blessings and give these people a break. There are lots of places to catch walleyes. Does anyone really need to camp out right in front of these folks with their boat???

2-If you're gonna fish one of the high pressure spots like Williams narrows, you are going to have people fishing close to you. Very close!....don't get your skibbies in a knot. If you don't like this kind of fishing, move to another area.If you do fish one of these crowdew areas have some patience and some courtesy. There are likely women and children fishing nearby, don't be an arse.

3-At the landing, most of us know to be courteous and how to quickly and effeciently launch. Not everyone does.After I get my rig ready, I like to watch out for others that may be struggling. Not everyone is equally skilled. If I can help someone out, I'd rather do that than stand back and gripe.

Good Luck, have fun.

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Well put PEATMOSS, and with all the boat traffic, be SAFE!!!

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Yep, yep, yep,...some simple courtesies can make the fishing more enjoyable for everyone.

Shore anglers have to contend with a lot...Some oblivious actions.

- Don't go walking behind someone who's about to cast. Likewise look behind you before you cast, you might catch somebody's kid.

- Learn to cast straight. If you cast crossed over someone, at least have the courtesy to reel it quickly back in without tangling their line.

- Don't go butting infront of the person who's just caught a fish. They didn't vacate that spot on the shoreline and called it a day just yet just because they are standing right there.

- Don't play with your fish, allowing it to swim up and down the shoreline getting everyone's line all tangled. If it's an exceptional large fish, other anglers please reel in your lines else you'll be part of the line tangle.

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- It's going to rain, snow, sleet, or combination thereof.

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No no dont say that. Thats the cheesehead forecast like every other year. grin.gif

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Ah come on now Steve. It wouldn't be opener without some white stuff stinging your eyes, numbing your fingers, and getting you all wet in that 30 mile an hour east wind. smirk.gif

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I think that everyone should fish on the upper St. Louis River and get some practice on fishing close to other boats and dodging casts from shore, they wouln't have any trouble fishing in spots like Williams Narrows.

I'm heading off to fish with the Cheeseheads in boat that has big pee colored G on the side of it. I promised them that I would give them some good instruction on how to catch a walleye. See you all Sunday night.

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Boy am I glad I live where I do! It sounds like it can be interesting to say the least fishing on these crowded lakes and rivers your taking about. I will usually fish "non popular" locations on opener, just so I don't have to deal with all the "opener fisherman", and guess what...I still catch fish!! shocked.gif Who would have known you don't have to fish elbow to elbow at the "spot" to catch Walleye?

The absolute funniest part about this... I go off by myself and fish an area that no one ever fishes, or at least an area I never see anyone fishing and within a short while, what do you know people start showing up to fish by me? I don't really care, but it's hilarious when they do this and I'm not catching squat, just trying something new! It doesn't take long and they're off to one of the "normal" spring hot spots. I know some people might be trying the same thing I am, and more power to 'em. But I've seen so many people do this, it's almost like no one knows how to find their "own fish" or "spot" anymore.

Personally I find it satisfying to know that I did something different and succeeded, or when fishing a new lake or river was able to figure it out on my own, that's part of the "fun of Fishing" but I guess that's me, others might not see it the same way.

As others have stated above. Take it easy, slow down and be safe. I Hope everyone has a great Opening Day.

See you on the water.... wink.gif

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Ya Down Deep its a art form isnt it? grin.gif A guy sure learns where and where not to anchor his boat thats for sure.

It could be a whole different ball game this year. Im thinking most people will find it hard to get up there and move around due to the very low water. Most people will probably stay down lower.

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A couple of oooops for the Aitkin Independent Age...

Every experienced fisherman has heard and read about all of the preparations for safety that should be taken before heading to the lake for the first fishing trip of the season: Run your motor, check your trailer and navigation lights, put the plug in, etc., etc., etc.

Yet every year experienced fishermen get caught in the foolish trap of over-excitement. Patience and good judgment go by the wayside.

The following stories, though true, were likely the result of an over anxious fisherman.The names have been changed to avoid possible harassment from friends and acquaintances.

Bob (not his real name) was coming in from an opening day excursion on Mille Lacs. The wind was brisk, the air was chilly, and the water was ice cold. After several unsuccessful attempts to drive his boat onto the trailer and sensing the tension he was creating while others waited, Bob stripped down to his underwear, jumped into the frigid water and physically tried to guide his boat onto the trailer. It was then that others who were waiting by the landing came to his rescue and helped maneuver his boat onto his trailer. With a quick and embarrassed "thank you," Bob jumped into his truck, still in his underwear, and pulled away.

It took Bill two years before he realized that fishing at midnight on walleye opener was not in his best interest. Bill planned to fish Pelican Lake on opening weekend, so he and his cousin made the necessary arrangements. They even took Bill's fourth grade son along, just in case they needed an extra limit. About 11:30 p.m., Bill pulled into Jones Bay access on Pelican and waited his turn to launch his boat. As Bill's cousin backed the boat into the water, Bill waited on the dock. It was a bitter cold night and snow was spitting across the water. With the boat now in the water, Bill decided they could be fishing sooner if he turned the boat around on the dock so that they were ready to go. As he edged his boat around the dock, a spotlight lying in the boat temporarily blinded him, and Bill walked right off the dock into six feet of ice cold water. As he grasped the side of the boat, gasping for air, his nine-year old son looked over the edge of the boat and said, "What are you doing, Dad?" Bill went home, put on warm clothes and returned to troll for walleye in the shallows of Pelican Lake. Bill, however, was a slow learner. He returned the very next year, to the very same landing, at approximately the very same time to try again. This time Bill backed his boat into the water. As he stood on the trailer to release the boat and hand his son (now a fifth grader) the rope, the emergency brake on the truck released, and the trailer began rolling deeper into Pelican Lake. As the water reached the bottom of the tail gate, Bill jumped into the water, now waist deep, and made his way to the door of his truck and pushed on the brake with his hands. Water gurgled across the floor of his pickup. As he watched helpful bystanders approached, Bill thought he heard someone say, "That's the same guy who fell off the dock last year." Bill loaded the boat onto the trailer, drove home in his soaked clothes, and has not fished at midnight on walleye opener for 15 years.

For Al, launching his boat on Bay Lake resulted in a more serious consequence. Al had a roller bunk trailer and was in a hurry to get it into the water. So, he unlatched his boat from the trailer before it was in the water and started backing down the landing. Hitting the brake prematurely, he watched in horror as his boat rolled off the trailer onto the ground. The front of his boat rested on the back of the trailer, but the motor lay on the cement with the prop broken completely off.

Generally, the accidents that take place in situations like Bob's and Bill's and Al's are the result of our excitement to get out and fish. For Bob and Bill, the results were funny tales for later years; but for Al it was more costly. To avoid these situations we need to slow down and remember that a five minute delay to get onto the water isn't that important. With a little extra patience, we may be able to avoid serious consequences. As we prepare for another exciting year on Minnesota's great lakes, let the memories be about the big fish or the one that got away and the camaraderie of family and friends-not a nightmare at the landing.

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