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MSRiverdog

Anybody have ANY idea?

7 posts in this topic

How many calls the DNR Tip Line gets at this time of the year?

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Heck I wonder how many calls from Pool 2 by the Minnehaha confluence - I'm sure it's a ton MSRIVERDOG

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I haven't noticed as much poaching down at Minnehaha as of late. But I know CO's have been heading down there so that might have helped slow it down.

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What is the number by the way? I'll be heading back to MN in two weeks for the summer, ought to program it into my phone.

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I just found out the the number is on the back of your fishing liscense. I also found out you can call #tip from your cell phone. I haven't tried the second option, but I was just informedby someone under the LAKE JOHANNA post.

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Cell phone companies Cingular Wireless, Midwest Wireless, Unicel, and Verizon Wireless have joined with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Minnesota Turn In Poachers, Inc. (TIP) in calling a halt to natural resources violations in Minnesota.

Customers of these cell phone companies can now report natural resources violations 24 hours a day by keying #TIP.

"#TIP is the wildlife version of 911 and a great example of the public and private sectors using the latest technology to provide information to conservation officers about a natural resources violation," said Minnesota's chief conservation officer, Col. Mike Hamm. "Conservation officers need the eyes and ears of every outdoor enthusiast to help detect violations and protect our natural resources."

For example, if a man hunting in remote northeast Minnesota witnesses a deer poaching incident he can use his cell phone to dial #TIP and immediately be in touch with Turn-In-Poachers. At the same time, a woman fishing on the Mississippi River sees a fishing violation. She picks up her cell phone and dials #TIP where her message is relayed to a conservation officer.

The current TIP hotline number, 1-800-652-9093, is still accessible by cell or landline callers who want to report natural resources violations. Cell callers now have the advantage of an easy-to-remember shortcut in #TIP.

Hamm said the TIP Hotline, like 911, is a system to report violations and is not intended to be used as a general DNR information line. Callers using the hotline are able to remain anonymous and provide information on violations. Callers inquiring about general DNR information should call the DNR information Center at (651) 296-6157, toll free at 1-888-MINNDNR (646-6367) or a local DNR office.

"#TIP provides another asset to natural resources protection," Hamm said. "The key to this program is the easy to remember calling sequence and cellular phone." Hamm encourages those who participate in outdoor recreation to take their cell phones with them to the fields, woods and on the water. If they see a violation, key #TIP on their cell phone keypad to report it.

TIP is a non-profit, privately funded organization whose mission the last 25 years has been to halt the illegal poaching of game and fish in Minnesota. "TIP and the DNR are also installing TIP Hotline signs on wildlife management areas and public boat accesses this year to increase awareness of the TIP hotline," said TIP Executive Director Al Thomas.

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Quote:

TIP is a non-profit, privately funded organization whose mission the last 25 years has been to halt the illegal poaching of game and fish in Minnesota. "TIP and the DNR are also installing TIP Hotline signs on wildlife management areas and public boat accesses this year to increase awareness of the TIP hotline," said TIP Executive Director Al Thomas.


With all the talk and yearly rehash of this subject it would seem to me that the signs should be posted in areas, (for all the reasons we read about) * dams, shore fishing areas patronized by so many, that these areas posted, in multiple common languages (yeah, I know) along with limits, pictoraly if nessasary might do some good, if the regs were not followed arrest would be an easy option. If they're taking fish and in a boat it wouldn't be needed, if they own a boat, they should be able to read English.

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