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MIDNIGHT777

Good Tent?

15 posts in this topic

I am looking for a good 2-4 person tent. Mostly will be wife and I, but the extra room for the dog and gear would be nice. I want a good tent that will undoubtly stand up to the elements, if there is such a tent, even if I have to pay a few extra bucks.

Any help appreciated, Thanks

Matt

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Check a few layers down in the Camping Forum. There's been several good threads.

Tell us about what kind of camping you do, where you go, what you bring, etc.

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Thanks, will do Ron!! laugh.gif

Usually on summer fishing trips I stay at different hotels/resorts up north (mille lacs, Winni, Rainy lake, LOTW ect). I want to try camping instead to try and save a few bucks along with a couple other reasons.

In the past myself and college friends have done Rainy Lake Houseboats for a week. Unfortunately this year it is not going to work out. I still want to go and take the wife up there instead. I figure the best option to fish Browns Bay would be to camp.

I just want something that is going to last. Also is not going to leak and will not be torn apart by a gust of wind causing the vacation to come to an end early.

Thanks, Matt

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AGain, I would say to look through the camping threads cause we had a great discussion about it last summer.

I think there are a few decent tents out there sold by "sporting goods" stores, but if you're looking for something that is meant to last and stand up to the elements and not just hang out in a state park then you need to check out the camping and high adventure type stores like REI or Midwest Mountaineering. The things I look for in a good tent are a full coverage fly (comes all the way to the ground, not just an awning over the doors), vents in the fly and at least one vestibule. That way you can store gear and shoes outside your tent and create more room inside the actual tent for people and pets.

I have the REI brand Half Dome 4. Its a 4-person tent. My wife and I and our 2 daughters (4 & 6 yrs old) camp in this just fine. It has all of the features I want including 2 vestibules. No muddy or sandy shoes enter the tent and the packs stay out there too. It has been through severe thunderstorms and survived. Using the proper guylines it stood up to 70mph winds. Without the guylines it had trouble, but any tent would. I went out in the storm and stretched some lines and it help up like a champ. No parachuting since the fly extends to the ground and no rain was blown underneith. The fabric is already waterproof so you just add seamsealer every couple years to keep it up.

Yes I'm a little emotional about it wink.gif but I want my stuff to work. If you can, go to REI in Maple Grove or Roseville you can set up any of the tents (not just REI brands) on their floor and see how they work and fit you. We acutally decided on a smaller tent by doing this. We got what we needed and nothing more. Its lightweight for backpacking or winter camping, but big on features.

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I've had excellent results with a Gander Mountain Guide Series dome tent. It stood up to winds that blew down pretty much all other tents in the campground when we were out at Mobridge a number of years ago.

Dunno the exact model, or if they even make that style anymore.

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I have two tents. A Eurika for portage camping and a Cabelas Alaknak for car camping. The Eurika is the standard tent all the outfitters in the Bdubs use. Nice and light and sets up fast. The higher end models have mesh that no-see-ums cant get through. My Cabelas Alaknak tent is simply the coolest tent I have ever seen. They have a vidio on thier website. I will not do a 200 rod portage with it however.

REI definatly has quality stuff, but it can get spendy.

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Go to Cabelas website and look at their tents. They have some top of line models. I have their XWT (Extreme weather tent) 12x12 ($600) and love the thing, but you won't want to carry it too far. There is a video on this tent also. I believe I recently saw an ad for Cabelas upcomming outdoor days (or something like that). They usually set up 10 or 12 tents so you can see what they are like. You may get some kind of a promo discount at Cabelas if you get one of their credit cards.

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Check out the tents made by Mountian Hardware. Flawless performance in the 2 to 4 person line.

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Eureka Tetragon 9. Solid tent, and not too expensive. Plenty of room for 2 - 4 people.

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If you're camping out of the car, or boating in where no portaging is necessary, I would seriously consider a larger cabin tent. Something big enough to set up cots or even folding chairs in.

I see Eureka has a newer model out called the Pine Lodge, and might be worth a look. For long-lasting materials that can take a beating and keep you dry, a canvas tent has several advantages. Trek makes a couple of models that you can get your mitts on for under $350, and have full floors, windows, and external frames. Where weight and space aren't a big consideration, canvas tents are really nice.

Granted, the larger tents I'm referring to aren't going to be the preferred shelter on canoe camping trips - but if you're dragging along the wife or kids, planning to base your vacation out of a tent, the added comfort and room of a large tent is no small consideration.

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Like nearly half the planet, I own the Eureka Timberline 4-man. It's my 3rd Eureka (previously: the Timberline 2-man -- college backpacking days, and the SpaceII 10x10 cabin -- family car camping days) The 4-man is perfect for the two of us. Go figure. Added the vestibule which is nice for leaving the muddy boots outside the door. All 3 of my Eurekas have survived tornadic winds and torrential rain without complaint. Not tall enough to stand up in, but very lightweight for their overall interior space. Pretty much a workhorse, no-nonsense model that has been around for decades. (But, what do I know, I also own 2 Ford Tauruses.) wink.gif

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Eureka Timberline - Outfitter Version - Six man

I have the 4 man and love it.

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As a rule of thumb I treat a two man tent as a solo. A 4 man makes a good 2 man tent, and a 6 man means you can bring a couple of packs in with the two of you.

Timberlines are pretty good tents - and the standard for canoe campers. I've got one myself! The only kick I have with the Timberline, or any A-frame tent is that your useable floor space is somewhat compromised by the sloping walls.

That said, if portaging is not a consideration I'd go for a big monster of a tent. And if I really wanted a bomb-proof shelter and planned on using it in ugly conditions, it would be canvas. Spring and fall base camping trips up north I actually use a canvas wall tent with a folding wood-burner for heat. That canvas palace is a welcome retreat when snow, sleet and ugliness set in!

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I toss a vote in for Kelty tents.

The first time I had my tent out, it saw 14" of rain without a drop inside....and it's been through some strong winds in Western North Dakota without bending at all. Plenty of good tents out there.

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