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Dahitman44

2 bank vs 3 bank charger?

19 posts in this topic

I have a bigger boat now and she has a 175 Suzuki on it. The sales fella tells me that I DO NOT need a three bank charger on it because the 175 has a 40 amp alternator and other motors have a 25 amp. He thinks I will NEVER need that. he said the starting battery will not need to be hooked up.

Do you guys believe that?

Thanks in advance

Hitman

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Get the 3 bank, here's why. Assuming that most of your electronics and such are attached to your cranking battery. If you fish a long day and have your livewells, graph, gps, radio, bla bla bla on and it drains your battery pretty well. Your on a lake where you may only take 5 minutes to get from one side to another being you can probably push 50 mph with your boat (Big Cormorant would be one) so your alternator puts out 40 amps per hour meaning you just put a little over 3 amps back into your battery for every 5 minute run. By the end of a long day, your run back to the landing puts a final 3+ amps in. If you do this a couple days in a row, your battery will be pretty low and if you don't charge it, you know how batteries can go bad if their left without a full charg, or you may find yourself out on the lake trying to jump with your trolling motor batteries or just plain up &@#%$ creek. So, get the three bank, most people have one and ones that don't wish they did because they now have to charge their cranking battery with an external unit.

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That is what I am trying to tell the guy. I think he is a goof.

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I second that. 3 bank for sure. I was just looking at them in the BPS catelog and thinking about up grading my 2 bank to 3 bank this summer.

mr

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Why are you even listening to him confused.gif. Just get the 3 bank, don't even consider getting a 2 bank, you will most definately be sorry if you do.

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F-Dog --

That is what I am going to do.

Hitman

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good choice.

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Did I screw up?

I bought the 2-bank Dual Pro because (1) it was all the store had (2) the guy in the store and the guy at the boat place said I DO NOT need to charge the Suzuki 175 and (3) it was on sale.

Do you think they are right? Should the alternator keep that starting batter charged? He also said that the type of charge the Dual Pro puts on the starting battery is not suggested for the starting battery.

Thoughts?

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I have a 2-bank Minnkota charger with 24 volt Minnkota trolling motor. I have used it for 4 years. I have all my other electronics (stereo, graph, lights, trim, bilge and livewell pumps) connected to the same starter battery used to start my 125 Mercury. Originally, I had the same concern you do, so for peace of mind I threw a pair of jumper cables into a compartment just in case the starter battery died, so I could jump off a trolling battery. In 4 years, the cables have never came out and the starting battery has never died while fishing, so I think you'll be fine. If it makes you feel better, throw in a set of jumper cables. Thats been my experience.

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Cables?

Great idea. I never would have thought of that. Thanks.

Hit.

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I have used cables a couple times but what Ii find handier is one of the yellow jumper boxes/they have lights and 12v hookups also..a great piece of equipment in the boat. THe ones ya see at Fleet or wally for like 40 bucks.

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I have thought about picking those up for a long time -- I should do that. Have them for the boat in the summer and car in the winter. Me Smart. grin.gifgrin.gif

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They also work in the fishhouse again either for 12V or the light on it>>> Where have ya been hit.. This is a sportsmen must have!!!

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Yeah, I know. I seem to spend money on= stupid stuff but not stuff that will help.

crazy.gif

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Hit, just a thought. Some boat manufuactures use Dual Pro as their standard factory installed boat chargers, and all the ones I have seen, are 3 bank chargers. Mine is an example, it is a factory installed Triton (made by Dual Pro) 3 bank chargers. I believe Ranger uses them as well, and the ones I have seen are 3 banks. Just my .02

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Hit, just read your post on the equipment forum. Why'd you get the two bank? Must have fired to many pistols being that you're a hitman, and be hard of hearing now laugh.gif. Hopefully you can return and get the three bank one. Dual pro also makes one that will charge your trolling batteries while running your main engine, when your cranking battery is fully charged. I had one on my old boat, and will be getting one for my current one. Something to think about on long days or weekend trips when you don't have access to 110v power.

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Yeah I was shooting my Glock over the weekend. ... Still can't hit anything with that stupid thing. Glad that is not my weapon of choice. I did hit a soup can one time out of about 25 shots from 15 yards. I was close a lot but ... Horse shoes and hand grenades.

Yeah, plan to return the 2-bank.

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HAHA and your the Hitman. grin.gifwink.giftongue.gif

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2-shae --

I am nearly perfect with the .357, spitball and nerf missle launcher. smirk.gif

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