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You call that an extension?!

14 posts in this topic

Now here's an extension! grin.gif Hope this works, if not I'll try again!

[image]th_thelonrivermay12.jpg[/image]

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Now that's a extension shocked.gif How would you like to go for a ride with that one grin.gifgrin.gif

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I had that sent to me by a friend as well, my only question is, how do they get it started and begin drilling? Anyway, thats a lot of ice.

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Where's the big pile of ice chips that should be there from a hole that deep?

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Where's the ladder you would need to get up high enough to to start drilling? I am sure it is some sort of spoof...but kinda cool anyway cool.gif

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Kelly, I think thats the new "shaving free" auger! It's really quite amazing!! grin.gif

I agree, It's not real but it's still cool. However I have seen some pictures of really long augers used way up north, but still no where near that long.

I would probably ice fish alot less if I had to use something like that! I complain about using the 12" extension when out drilling alot of holes. shocked.gif

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It could have been done with an add-on auger, where you add sections from the top. I think someone on one of the forum subjects had talked about one previously, a month or so ago. Or of course a ladder could be used and hidden away to give a more dramatic surprise effect as the auger is pulled up.

As far as the shavings it looks like they may have pulled and cleared a few times by the piles off to the side.

Wonder what are all those poles around, 10 foot tip-up rigs??? wink.gif

If it is actually up in Nunavut, in the arctic, they could certainly have the 10+ feet of ice.

In the background it looks like a rock shore, glazed over, with ice blown or thrown up on it, making it look like a big Sunami coming down on them.

Of course it could be a quality hoax. shocked.gif

It appears genuine to me. blush.gifconfused.gif

Good one either way!!! grin.gif

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Nunavut (Inuktitut syllabics: ) is the largest and newest of the territories of Canada; it was separated officially from the vast Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999 via the Nunavut Act[1] and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act[2], though the actual boundaries were established in 1993. The creation of Nunavut resulted in the first major change to Canada's map since the incorporation of the new province of Newfoundland (including Labrador) in 1949.

It appears that scientific researchers use these augers to get samples of the soil and ice that have been covered up for eons. Made me wonder whats the thickest ice URL has ever seen. Is there one winter that stands out in the minds of the old timers? The weirdness of 1976's winter is the strangest one I remember but I'm only 43.

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I've been up fishing twice in Nunavit. I had a good long discussion with the Native who is hired on to sit at the lodge all winter to make sure there is something left in the spring (long interesting story involving native trappers and caribou hunters).

He said he had to twice daily open a hole in the ice to get his fresh water and to angle for a laker (if temps and wind permitted). Remember in the winter they have less than 3 hours of dusk-like light to work with. I asked him how thick the ice would get. He said in the area he kept open it would refreeze to about 6"-10" in 12 hours. I asked about the lake and he said it was all determined on the amount of snow on the lake. Surprisingly he said it would average around 48" thick. I really thought it would be thicker than that, but he said they averaged FEET of snow on the lake which would insulate it and only allow it to freeze so thick. As with most lakes with a lot of snow, slush on top of the ice was a big issue. Those using snowmobiles had to watch for slush pockets as they would instantly freeze their tracks if they got into one. Seems the average high is -10 and the average low is -35. Sounds like a great way to spend your winters... alone in a lodge, the only human contact is a sattelite phone call once a week to check in on you, and the occassional Native hunter coming through looking for free gas!

He was so bored the 1st winter doing it, he engraved an elaborate outdoor mural on the wall of his cabin... pretty cool. He said over time he got used to it.

The guy before him didn't. I guess he went whacky living up there alone in the dark. The lake freezes over in September and by December they weren't able to get ahold of him. They hired a ski plane to fly up and check on him. He was outside living next to a roaring bon-fire that was like 6' around and high. They estimated he would've been out of wood in less than a week. They lay in enough wood to get the caretaker through the winter to heat his ccabin. This guy was outside for the last 2-3 weeks keeping the bon fire going. Seems he saw ghosts and spirits in the cabin and they were trying to kill him. he refused to go in their. They hauled him out and dropped in the guy I talked to. His 1st winter up there was only from December to May and he was busy just trying to gather enough wood to stay warm and get his water and fish. He shot 2 caribou for meat and ate a lot of Ptarmigan. The second winter was the one he had to learn how to cope with the boredom as he wasn't as busy gathering wood and food. He says he enjoys it now... reads a lot of books and does handicrafts...

Good Luck!

Ken

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Well... if they kept their boots on... they would not have "Feet of Snow" !! shocked.gif

Does not sound too comfortable to me, no matter how little they froze! grin.gifgrin.gif

Seriously, how many feet of snow were you intending to post? wink.gif

As far as the video, it does not look like "really deep snow."

Good story...Sounds a lot like "Fish House Fever" on Red, when they are not biting! blush.gif

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Great Story Labs!!!

I have been to Nunavut also. I went up on the best fishing trip in my life. Ah flying over barren terrain, musk-ox herds scattering at the sound of th plane, and last in the middle of nowhere a Crystal Blue River appears. The Tree River, the best Artic Char river in the world. The hospitality, company, and fishing were non that could be rivaled. I encourage anyone who has not been to see it once in your life.

The way back from the Tree was a little dicey as our plane experienced problems with one of the engines and we had to go to Kugluktuk on the Arctic Sea. It was crazy to see a town like that. We went to the one store in town and they sold everything from food to furniture. It was also weird being in the middle of Nowhere (I mean truely middle) and seeing a TV on in the store that was watching ESPN on it. confused.gif

The Lake Trout fishing on Great Bear lake wasn't to shabby either. We didn't spend alot of time at it but our biggest was around 35 lbr.

We also were dropped off by a float plane on the Coppermine River to fish Char. One of the mornings we stopped at this little finger that shot off the main river. I thought maybe I will walk down it aways and cast a little. When I got down there all I could see were hundreds of Char fins sticking out of the water. There had to have been a thousand or more of these fish that thought they were going up the dead end to spawn or something and were just packed in. Needless to say we sent up a line of people and took turns hooking up with these fish. Once someone would hook up you took your fish to the left down the shore to make room for the next guy. It was unbelievable. Most were around 15-18 lbrs.

So yea its one you really have to save up for but really worth it. smile.gif

bear1_lg.jpgtrophy1_lg.jpg

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Try gettin one of those up a ice hole.. grin.gif

Not unless you have a 20 inch auger. shocked.gif

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Just thought was time to bring this back for another look.

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That's quite the auger.

I guess size really DOES matter, eh? blush.gif

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