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DTro

Thoughts on new truck

79 posts in this topic

I think the planets have finally aligned and I think I'm ready to pull the trigger on a truck.

For discussion sake let's use these numbers for a reference:

Budget of 20K or less (less is always better wink.gif)

Married with no kids

Drive approx 15-20k/yr

Small alum 14ft boat

No other toys to haul around yet (possible 4 wheeler purchase later this year)

4x4 for sure

I'm thinking I would like an outside box (non SUV) for the unmentionables that a catfisherman totes around wink.gif

I'm leaning heavily towards a double cab Tacoma. I've also eyed a few Ford Explorer Sportracs. The options/creature comforts you can get on a domestic vehicle blows away the Tacoma. On the other hand, none of my Toyotas have seen the repair shop yet.

I haven't ruled out a fullsize truck. Is the MPG gain worth the sacrifice in space?

Obviously this will have to be a used vehicle with my budget.

Opinions?

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i really don't think you will sacrifice much mpg going full size it will just cost more initially. but if you are looking at a toyota they seem to hold there resell value. as for the ford fourtrack you will get worse gas millage than a full size and you won't be able to fit a 4 wheeler in the back. i bought a 03 silverado extended cab for 16500 earlier this winter it had 50000 miles on it. i think you could find a full size really easy for under 20, just look around a little. as for the brand go with what you like i think all brands have flaws.

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For discussions sake... I really liked my Ford Ranger when I owned it. Then my dad bought one, my brother bought one, and then my dad bought another one. For awhile, everyone in the family owned the same model Ford Ranger except for mom.

My Ranger was a 1993 Extended Cab STX w/ the 4.0L V6 and push button 4x4. Pretty much fully loaded. I bought it with 30,000 miles for $14,500 and drove it until 120,000 miles.

For the most part, it was troublefree and didn't cost me much money in the shop. I was doing OK with it until I started pulling 2 snowmobiles around the state and the tranny finally gave up. Probably more a lack of maintenance on my part. blush.gif

I really liked the truck. My only reason for going bigger was towing and I needed more room for my ice fishing stuff.

For your needs, I think a small truck would work just fine. I would stay away from a fullsize until you "need" it. smile.gif Everything costs more with a big truck - initial cost, fuel bill, repair bills, tires, etc.

To fill up my GMC, 24 gallons at $2.45/gallon is just shy of $60. A trip up to Red Lake and back takes 2 tanks of gas. Normal "in town" metro driving, a tank lasts me about 1-1/2 weeks. Its fun filling it up!

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I really like the Dodge Dakota. It's not a small truck, but not a full size truck either. The 4.7 ltr will even pull a decent sized boat.

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I wanted a Chevy 4 door but ended up with a Ford. Both were a 2004 with the 4 doors. The Chevy had 51,000 and the lowest they would go was $21,000. I ended up getting the Ford with 34,000 miles for 18,000. For the extra $3,000 I just couldn't see being dumb enough to buy the Chevy. When I told the Chevy dealer he said some crap about the Chevy will get you that money back when you sell it. I said Really! You think when it's 20 years old it will be worth $3000 more then the Ford. I told him it would be lucky to bring $1,000. When 4 wheeld drive trucks get that old they are all worth the same. Almost nothing! I alos could never bring myself to buy a "Foreign" vehicle. Everything breaks down sooner or later and the price for parts is more on teh foreign jobbies.

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I've had good luck with my 04 Silverado. It pulls the boat with no issues, has gotten me into those "out of the way places" to fish, and the 4-wheel drive comes in handy for those lakes where they don't plow the access parking lots... grin.gif

03-03-07_1624.jpg

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Toyota over the Explorer overwhelmingly IMO.

Can't wait to hear from Airjer wink.gif

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I've got a 97 Toyota Tacoma extra cab 4X4 and love it. It does everything I need it to do, and more.It gets 16-22 mpg depending on the time of year, and if it's towing the boat or the wheeler, ect... I've got 17 mpg towing my 1660 Pro V, Extremely reliable, just change oil and fill with gas.The Dakota's are nice trucks, but why would you get a smaller truck with the same mileage as a 1/2 ton with less capacities? The Tacoma is one of the best selling compacts out there, and I agree that some of the domestics have alot more bells and whistles for the same amount of $$. The parts costing more for an "import" is false most of the time also.It's another rumor the "anti Japanese" people have created to steer you clear of a "foreign" vehicle.

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Short answer: Buy a toyota.

Long answer:

I think the tacoma is going to be your best bet, but it sounds like you already uncovered the biggest problem with buying a Toyota, the resale is so good. Yes I said it, good resale is a problem. shocked.gif Stay with me now, it's not a problem when you buy new, then it's a good thing. When you buy used it means the guy you are buying it from is benifiting from that good resale.

Looking at used Toyotas as well as Domestics side by side is brutal, the domestics are about half the price. A few years ago I was looking at 4 Runners and Grand Cherokees. I bought the Jeep thinking I was getting a good deal (BIG MISTAKE), I got 14/15 mpg, and spent thousands in depretiation and maintinance. I sold it and bought a new Tundra.

With that said if were you I would buy a tacoma or a domestic full size. Most of the mid size domestics don't get any better gas mileage than a full size truck (ask anyone with a dakota or ranger) and if you spend 15 to $20k on a domestic midsize today it will take a huge nose dive resale in the next few years.

Domestics - cheaper now more expensive

Toyotas - More expensive now cheaper later (and you don't have to deal with the headaches of repairs)

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Thanks for the thoughts, keep them coming.

Funny you mention the resale of the Toyota's. The one thing I do have on my side is that I bought a new Camry and I should be able to reap some rewards of that purchase to offset another Toyota if I so decide to go that way.

Wish I had to funds to buy a new Tacoma or Tundra smirk.gif

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If your gonna spend up to 20, spend another 5 and get new. The #'s probably aren't gonna be to far apart. I have a Dakota and like it. Mid size with enough power to tow. Don't like the look of the new ones tho. Their I go, spending your money. smirk.gif

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3 years ago I was in a similar position as you. I was looking at used trucks at or under $20,000. I like fullsize trucks and I ended up buying a brand new Dodge Ram quad cab with all the features you could want(hemi motor, 4x4, etc.) for a little over $23,000. That wasn't much more than the used ones I was looking at plus I got the benefit of the full warranty and better financing.

I would think there are still deals to be had like that if you take your time and look around. It was a "sale" truck in the dealer's Advertising that week. I would think you could find a similar deal with any of the major brands, but I chose the Dodge because I got "true" 4-doors.(and a Hemi!)

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Quote:

3 years ago I was in a similar position as you. I was looking at used trucks at or under $20,000. I like fullsize trucks and I ended up buying a brand new Dodge Ram quad cab with all the features you could want(hemi motor, 4x4, etc.) for a little over $23,000. That wasn't much more than the used ones I was looking at plus I got the benefit of the full warranty and better financing.

I would think there are still deals to be had like that if you take your time and look around. It was a "sale" truck in the dealer's Advertising that week. I would think you could find a similar deal with any of the major brands, but I chose the Dodge because I got "true" 4-doors.(and a Hemi!)


On a side note: If you buy a 4x4, which I would think you would want for those river boat landings, fuel mileage will not be much better in a compact truck than in a full size. Maybe a couple of MPG. With the compacts you sacrifice comfort, hauling capacity and towing capacity. What happens if you want to get one of those fancy river pros? grin.gif

IMO if you want fuel mileage get a car.

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Quote:

What happens if you want to get one of those fancy river pros?
grin.gif


That's exactly why I haven't ruled out a fullsize wink.gif

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3 weeks ago, I bought my 1st full-sized pick up. I have been looking since last July and never found the "right deal." I looked at Fords, Dodge and GM.

I bought an 03 Chev Silverado extended cab. Right now, GM has 2.9% for 60 months on all GM certified used vehicles. I love the ride and, other than leather seats, it is loaded with creature comforts.

With car sales numbers where they are at, it is a pretty good time to be a buyer.

Tom B

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With the problems of sales for the big three, you might want to look new. There are some great deals if you look around. Check the internet too. If your spending 20 for used you might find a new truck for 22-23000. Plus when you finance used you get a higher interest rate and end up spending about the same. gl

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I'm thinking along the lines of these last 2 guys. If you are going to finance the purchase of your truck, find out what interest rates are gonna be. A used vehicle for $18K can cost more than a new one for $22K if the interest rates are so different. Lots of dealers can compete with banks for rates right now cause the market is so bad for vehicle sales.

IMO of the two models you're looking at I would not get the Sporttrac. They are nice inside, but the box is small and the package isn't meant for outdoorsmen. An actual truck would suit you better The Sporttrac is made from an Explorer and not the Ranger. It would have Independant rear suspension (good for road but not offroad and towing). The motor is good in them, but I'm not sure about the tranny for towing service.

The Taco is a nice truck. If you're looking at those I would seriously check out the NIssan Frontier. I think they've got a better crewcab in the compact pickup and they drivetrain is very stout. I have a NIssan Xterra (Frontier as an SUV) and its been great. Strong motor, strong tranny, great suspensions and plenty of room. I wish I had a Frontier instead of my SUV so I did have the pickup box.

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With GM certified used and 2.9% financing for 60 months, it did not make sense to buy new. I could get near the same payment, but it was for a lot less truck. I wanted power seats, windows, all that. I had no interest in anything that was stripped down.

I think I got a lot bigger bang for the buck buying used.

Tom B

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I had a 2000 ranger with the 4.0, 4.10 gears and towing package=17 MPG. Bought a 2005 F150 and I am getting a 18 mpg, go figure.

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Ok:

Full Size Trucks;

For the guys who have extended cabs-->Do you wish you would have bought a 4 door?

For the guys who have a 4 door-->Would you trade your cab space for a bigger box?

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Quote:

Ok:

Full Size Trucks;

For the guys who have extended cabs-->Do you wish you would have bought a 4 door?


No, but the 170 degree opening rear doors on the 07 GM's would come in handy. It gets a little tight in the parking lots getting the little ones out of the back.

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We looked at 4 full doors and test drove 3. Bonnie said that she would not want to take family trips in a pick up, so that made the decision easy. No point paying a premium for something that we would not need. We have a van for family trips and the like.

I bought my truck so that I could get rid of the trailer I use for hauling our dirt bikes. Now, I can put the bikes in the back and look for a pop up camper. When I get a camper, I am sure that there will be 3 of us on some trips, but the youngest says that she will be fine in the back seat for those kinds of trips (never longer than 3 hours from home.)

I had thought about an 8 foot bed and getting a topper, but I could not find a topper tall enough to roll the bikes in.

To make a long story longer....

We/I was originally looking for a Ford F150 super crew lariat. I really liked the one's that I looked at. None of the dealers would budge on price, though. One dealer even told me that they would raise the price as soon as the snow fell (this was in August.) They still had that truck in their lot in December.

I was pretty turned off with the way we were treated at the Ford dealership (2 different trips and 2 different salesguys), so we started looking at Dodge and GM. Dodge probably had the most truck for the money, but the price difference was not enough to make up for the lower gas mileage that Dodge gets.

I had been looking for trucks to test drive via dealer websites and the Chev that I bought was one of the trucks that I decided to look at after a Sunday of searching websites. It was my 1st choice on my list and the dealer gave me a good price right away, the 2.9% sealed the deal.

I spent less time at the GM dealer buying my truck than I did at the Ford dealer getting jerked around.

I never considered foreign brands.

Tom B

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Quote:

Ok:

Full Size Trucks;

For the guys who have extended cabs-->Do you wish you would have bought a 4 door?

For the guys who have a 4 door-->Would you trade your cab space for a bigger box?


If you get a 4 door you will never look back. Some people may say they get along fine with thier extended cab w/suicide doors but that is probably because they have never had a 4-door.

As far as giving up cab space for box space, you don't have to. My quad cab dodge is 4 door but really just an extended cab. I still have a 6 1/2 foot box. Ford now has a 6 1/2 foot box option on the half ton trucks. Maybe some of the others do to, I just don't know about them.

The full 4-door trucks like the fords are the best because you get all the room in the cab and in the box. The only thing is I'm not sure if you can get one for the price we were talking about. The dodge quad cab may be a good option for you unless you want to haul your buddies around in it. The back seat is not quite as big but you still get the convenience of the 4 doors.

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I will agree totally with Dave. I had the regular extended cab and the full 4 doors is the way to go. I know I will never look back. I'm also not sure where people are getting prices of $22,000 and $23,000 for a new truck...it sure isn't a 4 door. I started looking at new and only chevys. Lowest price I found was $27,500 and that was after wheeling and dealing.

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I have the 4 door Super Cab and it works great for me. I don't think I would go with the crew cab(personal preference), unless you are going to be hauling a crew of guys around with you. The Club Cab/Super Cab has quit a bit of room back there, plenty for what I figure to be occasional passengers.

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