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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

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Freckles

Salvage Yard Experts

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Freckles

I need a new rearend for my F 250 Super Duty. the tag on it reads S 406 H on the top of the tag and it reads 3.73 1051F07 on the bottom of the tag. The rear end I found reads S 413 B on the top of the tag and reads 3L73 1051C27 on the bottom of the tag. Will this rear end work ?

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Valv

Wow, that is a good question....

Have you tried to post on any Ford Truck forum ? There are many technicians that will help you.

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Valv

IOk, I have this site I found for used parts, enter your specs and check the options at the end, it will mention the S406H but not S413B.

Used parts

Try to enter different years and models to see if you can match second tag numbers

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harvey lee

If you were to call French Lake auto salvage and talk to them I am sure they could tell you.They are in Annadale phone I believe.Or maybe just google.

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upnorth

If the spring mounts, the U-joint bracket and the gear ratio are the same it should work, or at least I can't think of a reason it wouldn't

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Valv

Quote:

If the spring mounts, the U-joint bracket and the gear ratio are the same it should work, or at least I can't think of a reason it wouldn't


They have different versions, drum brake/disk brake, ABS, non ABS, posi, non posi, dual wheel / single wheel.

The first set of numbers on bottom line of tag is actual ratio, as you can see 3:73.

These are mostly Dana axles, all 3 mfg have basically same unit (Dana 60 light duty, Dana 70, and Dana 80)

There is a threshold of compatibility between them, but answer has to come from somebody with knowledge.

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Freckles

I went on a Ford Truck forum with this same info and I got a reply back. The person said it should be a perfect match. He also stated that the one I found has limited slip, which my old one didn't have. Is this a good thing?

Freckles

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hanson1287

Limited slip is a great thing to have on a truck. Say if one tire is on ice and just spinning the other tire will lock up a bit and will kick you off the ice. This is from my understanding, unfortunately I haven't experienced it first hand as I don't have a new enough truck for it.

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Powerstroke

What you found is absolutely correct. The axle you have on your truck is a non-limited spil 3.73 10.5" rear end. That is what the 105 is in the second number.

The second axle is the same gear ratio and includes the limited slip rear end. It is a perfect match and yes the limited slip is a good thing.

Factory LS is not the greatest in limited slip options, but its better than having an open diff. If you've ever been on snow or ice and spinning the wheels you know that you were only spinning 1 wheel. That is what an open diff is. When you add the limited slip it will use friction plates within the differential to slow down the spinning wheel and apply power to the wheel that is not spinning. It shares the power from the tranny between both wheels. This helps you get more traction.

The Ford 10.5" rear end is a very stout unit. The Sterling 10.5 has only been in the Superduty trucks so you know it will match.

The only thing I would suggest is having the exle looked at by a driveline place. Make sure all the bearing s and seals are good and that the fluid has been checked. An install kit (what you use if you were to replace the ring and pinion gears)has all new seals and bearings and is not that expensive. Having the limited slip may require a synthetic gear lube or one with a friction additive since it has the limited slip.

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PierBridge

Quote:

If you've ever been on snow or ice and spinning the wheels you know that you were only spinning 1 wheel.


Name that movie. grin.gif

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upnorth

Quote:

They have different versions, drum brake/disk brake, ABS, non ABS, posi, non posi, dual wheel / single wheel


Just because it is not an exact match doesn't mean it wouldn't work. Although the length of the Dual/Single thing wouldd have a pretty large impact, but the spring mounts are probably gonna be different on those too.

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Whoaru99

Quote:

I went on a Ford Truck forum with this same info and I got a reply back. The person said it should be a perfect match. He also stated that the one I found has limited slip, which my old one didn't have. Is this a good thing?

Freckles


IMO, limited slip has good points and bad points.

If the ground you are spinning on is relatively flat, no big deal. However, if the ground you are on is sloped - even a little - the rear end will slide out toward the downhill side if you spin with a limited slip. They can get a bit squirrely under some conditions. I've had some interesting situations occur on crowned roads w/icy conditions or on muddy side hills....

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Powerstroke

As far as I know (I used to own a superduty), they have all had 4-wheel discs for brakes, you already found the difference in LS or non-LS and then the dual/single rear wheel thing.

Ford doesn't use the 10.5" for the dually trucks. It is a Dana 80 I believe, same thing as in the Dodges.

Anyway, any Sterling 10.5" rear end will work for you.

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Freckles

I would like to thank everyone for their advice and helpful information. We got the rear end in yesterday morning and every thing went together perfect. Just a heck of alot of work when we did it with out the truck on a hoist. Took her out for a drive and it runs great.

Thanks Again Freckles

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TRITC

PierBridge,

"My Cousin Vinny"

But it was Alabama (or some southern state) mud, not snow/ice. This would be Minnesota's version I guess!!! tongue.gif

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