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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

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bturck

Knife Lake DNR Netting

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bturck

I was on vacation all last week at our cabin on Knife. Noted on Tuesday several marker buoys indicating netting. Only two possibilities, but it was the DNR. I spoke with them at the landing on Tuesday evening as they were calling it a day. They net the lake every 5 years and use 6 differnt locations, moving the nets once they are pulledand counted to a new spot. The information will be available on the LakeMap site next August.

They stated good netting results with walleyes showing good reproduction (naturally). Also good size for pan fish, the northern count was down from prior survey, however fish netted were larger. It was definitley interesting to talk with both of these fellas, from Hinckley. It will be interesting to see the total report. bill

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mplspug

Cool. Stinks that we have to wait a year to see the results, but I guess that's how it goes when the funding isn't up to par. Their preliminary findings sound exactly about what my brothers have been reporting. Did they say anything about bass? The LM are way diwn, but the SM suprisingly seem to have a strong population forming.

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Wavey Davey

There are no fish in Knife Lake. NONE !!!

What they didn't tell you is the average size walleye is 8" cool.gif

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bturck

mplspug: they said that they had electofished for the bass in early spring and found some nice fish, however they were not schooled up. My wife release a 19" a couple of weeks ago, I've released three over 16" and we've picked up lots of small LM fishing crappies and eyes.

WaveyDavey: I watched two of the net pulls and you are correct lots of small 8-10" eyes. I still feel that is positive as those are the fish of tomorrow. So far this year I've released a 24",21" and a 17". On Friday night last week we caught 13 with the largest being only 12", all were released by the way. this is only our second year on Knife, so I'm not sure what the past has been like since the reclamation. If there was a heyday for large wallies and all the live wells were filled that can take its toll on any lake. Three years ago on Lake of the Woods you could catch a 100 11-12" eyes in a day literally, last year it was hog heaven with the 16-18" fish. So hopefully the small fish being netted on Knife is a positive thing for a few years down the road. Good luck and hang on. Bill

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Wavey Davey

Bill,

I was kidding about the "no fish" but not about the average size walleye. Your year sounds about right. Lot of 8" to 12" and maybe you get lucky and get one over 20".

I think the reason for not many inbetween is the amount of fishing pressure it gets and the release slot. When people do catch an "eater" (say 13" to 17") they are likely to keep them. Not many that size in the lake now, and in a year or two when the smaller class grows they'll disappear too. I don't think you can compare Knife to LOW.

Knife has never produced at lot of "Hogs" or limits.

Good luck and leave a few fish for me cool.gif

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mplspug

The bass fishing used to be outstanding. There was a good class of fish that had managed very well and I saw one very big one caught off a dock while I was in a boat. It was certainly over 5# and probably closer to 6 or 7#. I believe they kept that hog, which is unfortunate, but that's how it goes.

Now it seems other fish have taken over and maybe the ecology is finally settling into equalibrium. It's been about 17 years since the reclamation now and we have been fishing there since 1995. My grandma had a cabin on Knife, but it was sold after the flood/dam incident. I don't remember much from those days as I was a tike. But my brother inherited a cabin from his grand parents-in-law. It's is very interesting to to have been able to follow the changes that lake has gone through. Not only to the ecology, but the lake structure as well.

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bturck

mpls: As I mentioned this is only our second year on the lake. I've always considered myself a fairly proficient bass fisherman, but I can honestly say that finding any concentration of fish is a challenge. I fished tournaments for years and catch and release was something we just accepted and did, but I agree seeing large fish like you describe taken from any lake gets me just a bit upset. There are lots of eating size fish available. The DNR guys indicated that with 13 lakes they were doing, by the time they submit the final reports and it is then input to the DNR website is the reason for the time lag.

Wavey: I agree with you, my choice of words hog heaven was improperly used. I meant for it to mean satisfaction in being able to catch decent size walleyes rather than imply Knife will kick out large numbers of huge fish. They are certainly two different bodies of water. Its a pretty lake though and the fall colors were starting to strut their stuff last weekend. I'm headed back tonight for three days, hopefully the fish gods are aligned. Bill

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Wavey Davey

I have fished the lake every year since 1981 when my parents baught a seasonal place there. I now own it, have since 1999. So I go back 25 years on Knife.

I'm there almost every weekend, spring, summer and fall, and a couple of times in the winter.

Bill, welcome to the lake smile.gif

Dave

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mplspug

We might have to become smallie fishermen on the lake and that's not neccissarily bad. I think the days of catching lots of largemouth are gone and I don't think that was ever even the case. You'd catch a fair amount. But I would be willing to bet if a guy put his time in he'd catch a pig once in a while. A few years back a bass tourney came through one or two years. There were plenty of 3.5#+ fish. Those days are over IMO and I think the ecosystem changing is to blame more than anything.

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bturck

Wavey: It was a rainy windy weekend for sure. Didn't get much fishing done. My cabin is on Jenneke Point, light brown with burgundy trim. Right next to me is a large two story year round home. I have a green covered Floe lift at my dock and a blk/silver Alumacraft on the lift. If you're going bye honk, holler or wave. Bill

mpls: my wife did it again this weekend. Released a 20" LM right off the dock in the middle of the rain on a Northland Gum Ball jig tipped with a minnow. Thats two pigs for her this year. A few weeks to go before i pull the lift and dock. We do try to get up 4-5 times during the winter as well. We have a great furnace in the cabin, just have to haul water. Hope next weekend is a little more cooperative weather wise. Bill

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mplspug

I am glad to hear there are still some pigs in there. We were certainly spoiled there for a while. But I don't mind having the walleyes start coming back or the pike getting big.

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bturck

i sure agree with you on that. Which part of the lake is your cabin on? Bill

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mplspug

Two of my brothers have their own cabins there. Both are on the NW side of the lake. One in in the north bay on Sundbergs rd. The other lives next to the sherif on Sandy Knoll. It's the cabin that looks like it is about to collapse (that's what my brother hopes for so he can rebuild). I am not sure about the names of the the geography features, so where is your cabin exactly?

A couple of years ago we were one of the cabins that put on a good show on the fourth. We moved it to the other brother's when the sherif moved in. I didn't make it up there this year, but I know lately it has been a good show all around the lake. Those flares are pretty cool too when everyone lights them up.

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bturck

We are on the south/east shore. Its called Jenneke Point. If I am standing on my dock and look to me right I will be looking at the access on Hwy 65. Jenneke is the south point before you get to the big and little island. Green Floe Lift in front of the cabin.

You are right about the 4th, some truly heavy duty displays that are shot off over your way. Two cabins east of us they load up pretty well also. I agree with the flare show. I have a friend who is a pilot and he has flown over when its lite up, he said its pretty cool from up above to.

Doesn't Brett Grundmeier the CO also live up on that side of the lake? Maybe I'm wrong though. Bill

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mplspug

Ah, I believe Jenneke Point is close to where grandma's cabin was. So is the Crow's Nest kind of straight across the lake from our dock?

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fishkid

yeah knife lake rocks. for crappies and northerns

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Wavey Davey

mpls,

Your brothers place by the sheriff isn't to far from mine.

My wife met the sheriff (under good terms while out on a walk) and from what she said he's a nice guy.

I'm not a bass fisherman, walleye and crappies are my thing.

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bturck

mpls: If i am standing on my dock and look to the right the crows nest would be that direction just north of the #65 public landing. I can see their campground from the dock. we're probably 1/2 mile down the lake from the #65 access. Bill

Wavey: I agree with crappies and wallies. There is nothing better than getting into a nice school of crappies. The sunfish were hard to beat early this year as well. I kept a log on the first 6 weeks of the season after i had the boat in (Easter Weekend). My wife and I released over 600 crappies and sunnies, and this wasn't counting the little dinks. It was a ball. I do a lot of C/R being up as much as we are. If I don't need a meal right away I'll put em back. Its just fun to have the rod bend. Looks like another possible rainy weekend. I'm headed back tomorrow night for three days. Bill

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Wavey Davey

Bill,

Maybe I'll swing by and say Hi this weekend, I'll be in a white Northwood boat. Must be rough having all those 3-day weekends smile.gif

Dave

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bturck

Sounds good on the swing bye this weekend. Ya, its tough job but has to be done. Actually I'm practicing for retirement LOL only 3 years to go. I should have it perfected by then.....Bill

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mplspug

Very cool fellow Knife Lakians.

I normally keep a few crappie and sunnies in the spring, but that's about it. I take forever to fillet (try not to waste), but they are tastey. I let the bigger ones go, because they have the good genes or are more likely to, anyway. I keep the medium size ones when I do. I am glad to see the numbers of walleye rebounding a bit, because I think the majority of land owners up there fish for them. The pike and panfish keep me happy.

I might be up there Saturday or sometime to help my brother bring in the dock. Hopefully the crappies will be schooling.

I was going to PM you 2 with a tip you might not know about. Well, I'll tell you anyway here. Don't be afraid to try crawlers for the schooled up crappies in fall. I usually cut them in half or thirds. I have outfished people at times with them. It works other times of the year too. I usually start with crawlers and switch if I need to, which isn't very often.

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RonZych

Jenneke Point , Used to be called Indian Point. Tree huggers/liberals changed it.... grin.gif

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mplspug

Jeez, they could have renamed it stupid Polak point then. We don't get offended, eh Ron?

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bturck

thanks for the input guys, they can call it Der German Point if they want to, I'm not that thin skinned.

WavyDavey: Thanks for stopping by the dock on Saturday, it was nice to meet you. I may get a chance to swing bye your side of the lake this weekend. this one and one more and then I am going to pull the dock and the lift so I can head to SD to shoot some longtails. How was the fishing the rest of the weekend? No need for numbers or location, just a general statement. We had good luck again Sat night and early Sunday morning. Lots of releases. I would imagine with the wind this week a lot of bare branches will be showing through this weekend. I'm headed back tomorrow night, might run into you out there. Bill

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Wavey Davey

Bill,

Only one decent eye last Sat. evening, the rest were 8" -10". Full moon this weekend, hoping for the bigger ones, although it might be a couple of weeks before the bite improves. Just checked the 10-day weather forecast, mid 20's and snow flurries towards the end of next week. I will be pulling the boat out soon but leaving the dock in for a while. Stop by if you're out on the lake.

Dave

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  • Posts

    • Rick
      State wildlife chief addresses upcoming season and future challenges By Paul Telander, DNR wildlife chief When Minnesota’s deer season ends Sunday, Dec. 31, it is quite likely the harvest will be in the 200,000 range.  This Minnesota Department of Natural Resources projection is above last year’s harvest of 173,213, below the 2003 record harvest of 290,525 and similar to the most recent 20-year average of 205,959. Prior to 2000, deer harvests in excess of 200,000 occurred only four times. Deer harvest totals typically relate to the size of the deer population and to a lesser degree to weather conditions immediately before and during the hunting season. On the 2017 season
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    • Rick
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    • muskie-mike
      Caught an 18 inch walleye on a crank bait and a 48" muskie grabbed it..Got it up to the boat a few times but rolled and cut my line,the walleye was dead and I had it for supper...got 2 muskies on walleyes,1 on sunfish and 1 on a crappie..
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      Still for sale?
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    • fishingdad
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    • gunner55
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      Any channel on any lake is dangerous.