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Swamp Scooter

Weather and acorns= no bears

6 posts in this topic

Just an invite for some feedback and maybe any tricks. We had bears coming daily to a variety of baits. Then nothing. No pressure, no competition. ONly thing that changed was the 40mph winds on Thursday, 2" of rain on Friday, Low pressure still and rain on Saturday, then Sunday got nice but still no bears back to the baits. Acorns started to drop like crazy so I am wondering if all these things added up to 5 days of not hits??

Good news was that they are now back but I am back to to work for a couple of days again. They hit hard late Sunday night/early Monday morning before I got to the baits. I stocked up on what they liked and hit the road. Any one else have bears that moved off? Any ideas on how to get them to just HAVE to come out when we are sitting?

They are not watching us, they like the food, they were coming in the day time, there are no other hunters around.

Just wondering if we are missing anything. We are baiting mid morning and then were getting to the stand in the afternoon and staying until dark, even dark 30 to try and see if they were making any entry but no hits until Monday morning again. Hard pattern to figure out.

Ideas I have are to bait earlier, sit earlier and longer. We did the reduce the bait thing, baited daily, gave them what they wanted. I think we have a dominant boar, at one stand, that pushed a few of the 200#ers off during the day and he now hits at dusk and others throughout the night. Still able to get day hits but not as frequent.

The big hope is for the cooler weather and the lack of weekend traffic so going for the mid week 2 day hunt.

Let's hear your wows or successes.

Thanks

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We have the same problem. I hunt in area 25 near the border of VNP. My dad, another friend and my taxidermist hunt in 24 on the Range. All of us had big time hits going for at least a week and then all of a sudden...nothing! I haven't had a hit since last Wednesday. On my trailcam I was getting a variety of bear coming in at a variety of different times and then the last picture of a bear is on the 30th. We all shared stories and it's pretty much the same. At least we felt a little better when we heard everybody was having the same problem. I think we each thought we were doing something wrong, but I don't think so now. I think they'll start up again either this week or next (hopefully). For some reason they just totally shut down on the baits.

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Sorry to hear that but I am glad I am not alone as well. The main bait shop in town only registered 2 bears all weekend! We are in 44. We did get them back on Monday morning so I hope they sit tight until Thursday when I am going to ambush them. More goodies and a sharp broadhead for dessert!

Any one else have the same thing going on and how do you break the cycle while you are hunting?

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Sorry to here this guys. I had 12 clients for the first 5 days. All of them have seen bears. Ten clients have shot bears so far. I have bait stations in 26, 51, 44. Had a pope and young come from 44. I even got the chance to get out yesterday and scored in the first 5 minutes of my hunt.

Just keep working and things should begin to happen. If anyone has any questions e-mail me at hoytmystic@hotmail.com

Good luck,

Hoytmystic

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Yea I'm doing the same, gonna back of on the hunting an just let nature take its course. Let it cool down, let them deplete the acorns, let this blasted full moon get out of here. too warm to wanna move during the day, too many acorns to worry about food, an a bigh night light up there that says Hey bear! I'll light the way for ya! sit tight till night. I'm gonna just let them know the candy store is still right around the corner every few days till the conditions are more favorable for hunting. Good luck guys Later boar

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  • Posts

    • Wanderer
      I guess if you want it bad enough, you'll be there. "Oral" auction might be the law when it comes to this type of sale. At least one has most of the month of October to shop for recreational land.  Not like there's anything else going on this time of year!  Thanks for posting, Rick.  It might be worth looking at that list.
    • HunterFisher11
      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.
    • Rick
      Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails. “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.” Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota. “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.” The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible. Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates. The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair. Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award. The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program. Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake. Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz. Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon. As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management. Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • BringAnExtension
      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.