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lone wolf

Trolling for yellow perch

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lone wolf    0
lone wolf

Has anyone tried this? I am referring to trolling slowly with beetle spins or small shad raps? Will this work as a locating method for schools of perch? I have used this method in late september when crappies tend to be spread out along the basin edges. I troll as slow as conditions allow, using a small beetle spin or twister tipped with a crappie minnow. I would think that a slight upsize and increase in speed should produce perch too. Are any of you dedicated walleye guys trolling shallow and hooking perch on shad raps? I just get bored watching a bobber and I like to cover area.

Just thoughts

Wolfie

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eyewarrior    0
eyewarrior

I haven't tried it recently but in the past you could connect with some nice perch trolling #5 shad rap on top of the rocks.

eyewarrior

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SteveWilson    1
SteveWilson

You will be surprised at how big a bait a perch will go after. I've had little Perch hit #9 Perch Shad Raps and they were the same size as the Rapala. So trolling #5 or #7 shad raps should find them.

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MLmusky    0
MLmusky

I have had several occasions this year were I have hooked perch on my musky lures.. Perch are kinda like little northerns, will hit anything that flashes (up until you actually target them through the ice, than they don't hit anything)

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SFBOY    0
SFBOY

HAD A BUDDY UP THERE LAST WEEKEND ON A LAUNCH. SAID THE PERCH WERE IN A FEEDING FRENZY. 14 ON THE BOAT CAUGHT OVER 400 PERCH AND KEPT AROUND 120 AROUND 10" OR BETTER BETWEEN THEM. NEVER HEARD OR SEEN ANYTHING LIKE THAT UP THERE. ANYBODY SEEING THIS KIND OF ACTION?

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hartner62    0
hartner62

That would have been a great time! Did they get any walleyes? Do you know what launch service they went out from?

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SFBOY    0
SFBOY

not sure of the launch that they went on but he did say that not one walleye was caught. sounded like they just landed on the mother load of starving perch. we have had a few days on the ice in march when the jumbos were literally biting one after the other, but even that didnt sound like the action these guys ran into. sorry that i cant provide more information as far as the launch, what they were using for bait, etc. I just got a quick email from him giving me the news.

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TRZ    0
TRZ

I do this alot, it also gets you into pike and eyes, even a few crappies in the right spots. The best color for perch is actually perch #5 regular shad rap, don't stop until you hit a few keeepers in the same spot then you are in luck, rock is good but sand is actually better for straight perch, but fewer pike. The weeds are worth a try as well, 8-10 feet. I have never gone up there and gotten less than 10 keepers using this method.

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MNDeerhunter    0
MNDeerhunter

That was us that were out there. We caught 159 perch in under 2 hours of fishing. Nothing kept under 10". We went out of Fisher's up on the Northeast side. We fished just south of there in 8' of water. If you want more specifics, I can maybe steer you in the direction.

We figure that we were keeping 1 out of every 3, so we estimate that we had landed slightly under 500 perch in 2 hours. The last 2 hours of the launch we asked Captain Randy to move and hopefully find a couple of walleyes, but no action.

We were fishing with leeches and partial crawlers on 1/8 oz jigs, using slip bobbers. Simple and apparently effective. We did get 2 small walleyes, and when I say small I mean around 3".

They took pictures of us with the "take", so I am hoping to see that.

Any questions let me know.

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hartner62    0
hartner62

Thanks for the info MNDeerhunter. Also I love the quote from Nugent. Great one to live by!! grin.gif

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SFBOY    0
SFBOY

DONT LET THE MNDEERHUNTER TAG FOOL YOU. THAT GUY SHOOTS THE FIRST SPIKE HE SEES EVERY YEAR. I'VE SEEN HIM DOWN HERE ON LAKE CALHOUN WITH A BUCKET FULL OF 3" CRAPPIES TOO!!! cool.gif

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MNDeerhunter    0
MNDeerhunter

Quote:

DONT LET THE MNDEERHUNTER TAG FOOL YOU. THAT GUY SHOOTS THE FIRST SPIKE HE SEES EVERY YEAR. I'VE SEEN HIM DOWN HERE ON LAKE CALHOUN WITH A BUCKET FULL OF 3" CRAPPIES TOO!!!
cool.gif


SF Boy is right, sort of...it really doesn't even have to have bone on it's head...my only prerequisite is that it's not still drinking from the mothers teat when I shoot it. wink.gif

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SFBOY    0
SFBOY

TJ, are you driving tacks with the bow yet? I would imagine that your wife is just about ready to become a single mother for the fall again real soon. You mentioned that your wife is going away the second weekend of hunting. Dont feel too bad about that. My wife is teaching a seminar outside of Seattle on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th of November and I have the kids. Check your calender and you can figure out how happy I am about that. Oh well, I'll get over it. The week after opener can be as good as any up in the neck of the woods that I hunt. There is so little pressure up there compared to the woods of Wisconsin that I grew up hunting in. Keep me posted on the hunt as it goes for you. Getting the kids out to do a bit of bowhunting in October. We will see if they can keep their mouths shut for any extended period of time. Take it easy TJ.

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MNDeerhunter    0
MNDeerhunter

Yeah, I was having a little trouble getting tight groups with the arrows that I was shooting, so I re-fletched the arrows with some 2" Blazers, and now I am getting really tight groups. Now I need to shoot them with the broadheads and make sure that they are still flying true. Got drawn for Ripley so I will be up there for that. I am hunting the 80 this weekend, and then Hinkley next weekend. So I guess that you could say that the Mrs. is ready to become a single mother for a few months now. Don't worry, I will send her a post card once in a while so she doesn't think that she fell off the radar.

Yeah I am less than happymad.gif that the women from her work planned this spa trip on that weekend, but gotta keep her happy...otherwise I wouldn't be able to persue my passions. I guess one weekend won't kill me. Besides maybe I will have a couple down by then? Keep in touch, and if need some ammo for that cannon of yours let me know.

TJ

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SFBOY    0
SFBOY

thanks tony. i loaded up with 150 grain x bullets this year. $3 a pop so that should last me for 19 deer now that i have proven to myself that they shoot the same as the 175 garbage that i was shooting. yeah, "weatherby... great guns, get a second job to shoot them" keep me posted on your season, you have my email.

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