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ScottND

What brand, color boat & motor do you have?

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ScottND

Who knows...maybe we see each other all the time on the lakes and don't know it.

What brand, color boat & motor do you have so we know who you are?

Mine is a white 1990 17' YarCraft with a 80 HP 4 stroke Yamaha & (2) Minnkotas. Tow it with a blue '02 Ram 2500 diesel shortbox. I may also use a stealth 1200 duck boat or red two-up kayak.

Come ice, a yellow Bombardier Outlander or a maroon Suzuki Vitara SUV.

My home lake is Big C. (unless it doesn't start acting better) grin.gif

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Dahitman44

ND --

I drive a maroon 04 ford with a TC and vikings sticker in the window. I have a tan Alunacraft with a 60 hp blue evenrude. You can spot me -- I am the guy with the 10" eyes. wink.gif

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ScottND

Quote:

ND --

I have a tan Alunacraft with a 60 hp blue evenrude. You can spot me -- I am the guy with the 10" eyes.
wink.gif


Yup...I've seen your rig out there. Next time I'll stop and say HI!

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DEADhead

if you see a sweet 19' Triton walleye edition with a 115 tiller and two 80ft-lb trolling motors being towed by a maroon GMC pickup with a topper, look in the passenger seat, it might be me tongue.gif

that's Fisherdog's boat.

The only boat I have is a 12 foot Starcraft that I use for duck hunting...

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Dahitman44

Mark --

You are going to need help. wink.gifcool.gif

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Freckles

Blue 2004 Lund Mr. Pike 17 with 115 Yamaha 4 stroke Pulled by a White 2001 Ford F-250 Super Duty Extended cab with a Turbo Diesel

Freckles

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cliffy

I have a silver Alumacraft Magnum 165cs with a silver 75 honda 4-stroker on the back...all being pulled by a red 05 ford f-150 super-crew (Matthews solo cam sticker in back window). You cant miss the boat...it has a FishingMN sticker on the back....and usually has a massive muskie net sticking out the top.

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RK

Hiya -

I run an tan-ish 18' Tracker Tundra with a full windshield and a 135 OptiMax. Not too many of them around so I kind of stick out. Pull it with a very dusty black Tahoe...

Mark - man, a '55 Seahorse... I'm jealous as hell. Just readin that brought back memories. I grew up driving around Crystal with a '55 5.5 hp Seahorse. Loved that thing. Then we got a 15 horse Evinrude, and man oh man did I think I was hot stuff then smile.gif If you EVER decide to sell that motor, please let me know. Seriously... I'd love to have one again, just to have it.

Cheers,

Rob Kimm

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Scoot

As of a few weeks ago, a 18' foot red and black Skeeter with a full windshield. 150 Vmax and a 9.9 4 stroke kicker on the back.

Swing by and say hi anytime! Always good to visit with fellow FMers on the water.

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minneman

Ive got the all to common 16' red lund with 40 merc, pulled by a red 03 2500 ram QC. you havent seen me out lately, work work work....

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fisherdog19

New boat eh Scooter, how's it going, haven't spoken with you for a while. We should get together.

My new/used ride: 19' Dark Blue with Maroon accent Triton Walleye Edition with a 115 yami 4 stroke tiller. I've never even seen a Triton around here, let alone a tiller, so if you see one, it's me. I must add that I love it. 25mph winds, and I can backtroll while staying right on top of fish. The wind just can't blow it around laugh.gif.

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ivegottabite

i have one of those common 16' red lunds with a 25 johnny on the back pulled by a 99 black x-cab silverado.

scottnd-i believe i saw you fueling up at the conoco in hawley yesterday on my way back to fargo. how'd the fishing go?

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Scoot

Fisherdog,

Congrats on the new rig yourself. You been able to dunk it in the water much? Despite the new rig, I haven't been able to get out much. My current life situation (job, wife, kid, house, etc.) has me fishing on the Red and on a few bigger trips each year- that's about it. I try sneak out occasionally, but it doesn't come together for me very often right now.

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Code-Man

We have a Crestliner with the Green interior and wish we didn't have the carpet because sand sticks out bad in it.

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Cicada

Dad, my brother and I bought a 15' Lund Mr. Pike in 1979. I've taken out the steering console and changed the floor two times. Newer 25hp Johnson with a bow mounted transom trolling motor that's being held together with electrical tape. Pulled by a Green Ford Ranger extended cab. I'm a really big guy so it probably looks like the boat is going up hill all the time.

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Fishin' Addict

I drive a Toyota truck attached to a Alumacraft Tourney Pro 170 with a tiller Yam. 60 2 stroke and an English Setter who points fish for me.

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Walleyeguy31

1850 lund Tyee, charcoal grey with a 150 Mariner motor and 15 horse merc kicker.

and

1800 Lund Pro V with 75 horse merc tiller

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Havin' Fun

I'm never around but....

16' 6" Red lund Pro Angler. 60 hp Merc 4 stroke! Greatest boat for the area!! Also have the neccessary splash gaurds.

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ScottND

Quote:

i have one of those common 16' red lunds with a 25 johnny on the back pulled by a 99 black x-cab silverado.

scottnd-i believe i saw you fueling up at the conoco in hawley yesterday on my way back to fargo. how'd the fishing go?


Whew...only took me a week and a half to see this post blush.gif.

That must have been on my way to Sallie to fish the league. It sucked shocked.gif One fish caught and there were 8-10 teams fishing. crazy.gif

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    • Rick
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    • Rick
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    • Rick
      The Sherburne County Geologic Atlas-Part B was recently published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Part B covers groundwater conditions and sensitivity to pollution. It expands on Part A, the geology atlas previously published by the Minnesota Geological Survey. The atlases are a valuable resource for groundwater management and land-use planning. Sherburne County is characterized by sandy surface and subsurface conditions. This type of geology creates extensive and productive aquifers that are relatively sensitive to pollution. In addition to maps of pollution sensitivity, groundwater chemistry data are shown, highlighting areas with elevated concentrations of chloride and nitrate. The deeper bedrock aquifers of the eastern part of the county are less sensitive to pollution. The atlas can be acquired through the following sources: Online: PDFs of the report and maps, GIS files and program information are available by searching “Sherburne County Geologic Atlas, Part B.” The GIS folder includes GIS files and associated metadata for the water table, wells, and maps for groundwater flow and pollution sensitivity. The ArcMap file displays the data as shown on the published maps and includes hyperlinks to image files of the published cross sections. Paper copies: Part A and B atlases can be purchased from Minnesota Geological Survey Map Sales, 612-626-2969. Prices for each atlas package range from $12–$15. County geologic atlases provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to support regional planning and water resource management and protection. Partial funding for this project was provided by the Clean Water Fund and the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • IceHawk
      Good Advice Don . You are correct there was a wheeler on Horseshoe back by Krons bay.  Saw him Sunday when I was out on the ice. How he didn't go through is hard to believe.  The chain  is very spotty at best. Finding areas of open water to 4 1/2 5  inches tops. A lot of guys r pushing the envelope out there on Sunday there was at least 10 guys out on mud and the ice is 3-3 1/2 inches thick in that area, also saw a group out near Camerons Island, A lot of these areas were completely open on Thursday so be very very cautious. Tom is right you could see the different shades of freeze up before this snow now its a guessing game. Remember u put others at risk that have to try and rescue you if you break through so use common sense. On a side note there is a pocket of open water on the N end of Big, swans are keeping it open and it just froze over yesterday in front of the golf course on Schneider.  Shaumans bay has 5-6 inches on Rice main lake 2-3 inches.  Koronis is still open was fishing in the boat two weeks ago out there so it may be a while for that beast!