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Hookmaster

Direction arrow on underwater camera

18 posts in this topic

I am thinking of getting an underwater camera with the Xmas gift cards I'm expecting. Is it worth getting a model with the direction arrow on the screen? I know it tells you in which the direction the camera is pointing but how do you use it? Can someone give me some examples? What do you use to turn the camera? I plan to use this ice fishing and also checking out structure in open water. Thanks.

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Hookmaster-

I'm not a camera user yet, but I'm expecting my new one any day and I've been contemplating this purchase for over a year now.

How do you use it you ask. There are 2 distinctly different ways.

One method is called downviewing. When you downview, you point the camera straight down and drop the camera down the same hole you are fishing out of, or a hole very near the hole you are fishing out of, and observe your lure from above. You can watch the action of your lure and notice when a fish comes in from any direction.

The other method would be to view your lure from the side, which is the natural way for most cameras. When you view from the side, you want your lure and camera down separate holes but they need to be at the same depth. The distance you place the holes apart will depend on the clarity of the water in the particular lake you are fishing. When you ask about the directional arrow, this will help tell you which way your camera is facing in relationship to your lure.

For example, if your lure is in your left hole and your camera is in a hole 4' to the right of your lure and the directional arrow is pointing to the right, you'll know you need to rotate the camera 180 degrees to pick up your lure.

Without the directional pointer, you will have to keep slowly turning your camera until you see your lure on the screen.

The new Marcum VS 560 has the directional indicator as well as a small remote control that you can point at the camera to control the panning of the camera. You can also use the arrow keys located on the camera to rotate the camera in the water. The unique thing about the Marcum is the camera rotates within the housing, all the other cameras on the market rotate the camera cord and the camera from above the ice surface.

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I have an OVS 560. Like Chris Hanson said, the camera (and lights) rotate 360 degrees in it's housing. The direction indicator works like a compass; When the arrow is pointing straight up, the camera is looking north (regarless of the way the monitor is facing). So far I've only used the feature to find my bait when I first get started. smile.gif

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If you are looking for the best underwater camara on the market the Marcum 560 takes the cake. It is one great unit.

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It is possible to locate your bait without the directional indicator, but it is tricky at best. I've wasted a lot of time rotating the camera around by the cable to locate my bait.

I'll be fishing with a MarCum VS 560 this year. This has a panning camera head (no need to rotate the camera by the cable anymore). It also has the directional indicator as mentioned above. This camera also has the most innovative lighting system on the market. I do expect this camera to set the new standard for underwater cameras into the future.

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I pre-purchased the new Aqua-Vu SV-100 along with the Aqua Vu MoPod2. This camera has both the on screen directional arrow, and the temperature read out on screen. The directional arrow can show either magnetic direction like a compass, or the direction the camera is pointing. With the MoPod2 (remote control tripod for turning the camera) this combination is the functional equivalent of the OVS560 and I was able to buy both for less than the price of the OVS560. It also has the fish shaped camera, the new Aqua Vu lighting system, and the Kevlar reinforced cable.

It should be available in a few weeks.

Brad

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Does the VS 460 have the directional arrow as well? The web site is a little unclear on this.

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The Nature Vision Aqua-Vu SV (Smart View) is the real deal to track fish and fine tune yourself on structure in any season or environment.

Next to the quality of the picture and the display I feel the compass feature is the most useful tool on a underwater camera system. Given a choice between lights or a compass I would opt for the compass every time.

Take a good look at the features on the Aqua-Vu SV before you buy anything. It is a top notch all season underwater camera system.

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I'm with a few others on this thread.. The Aqua-Vu SV is a great unit. It has the arrow on the screen which will tell you which way the camear is pointing. Which is nice, like if you drop the camera down and notice a weedline about 10 feet away and would like your bait nearer the weedline.. the arrow will then tell you which direction the weedline is. The other nice thing that the AquaVu will give you is all cameas come with the down view fin. For ice fishing the down view is the way to go!!!!

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Goodtogo,

The 460 doesn't have the directional indicator, you would need to go up to the 560 for that option.

The VS 460 and 560 both have the downview capability.

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The 460 has no on screen directional. It does have down viewing. Not sure what advatage down viewing is though. I'd recommend you have the camera down a different hole than the one you're fishing. So sideways will give you more to see. It's personal preference. The 460 and 560 have a 5 inch Sony monitor which is very nice plus they have Nite Vu lighting. It's really nice to have the camera rotate iside the housing too...if you've ever messed with a turning cable exposed to the elements you know what I mean.

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Quote:

The direction indicator works like a compass; When the arrow is pointing straight up, the camera is looking north (regarless of the way the monitor is facing).


I'm not sure this is correct. I believe the arrow direction indicator is pointing the direction (right, left, front, back or inbetween) the camera is facing, not the compass directions (north ,south, east and west). If you hold the camera and turn your unit the direction arrow will also turn. Be careful not to put you heater or other metal object next to your camera as this will throw off the magnets that control the arrows. Happened to me the other day and I couldn't figure it out until just now.

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Rodbender-

I believe you are correct. At the ice show, the Marcum rep pointed the camera, lets say to my left, and then rotated the monitor left to right and in a circle and the direction indicator turned to show which way the camera was pointing.

He then did the reverse. He left the monitor in one place and rotated the camera, the direction indicator turned with the rotation of the camera.

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Here is how the Aqua-Vu camera directional arrow works, taken from the write up on the SV-100 on their website:

"Direct-Tech indicates direction in two ways: Absolute and Relative. In the Absolute mode, compass direction and bearing are displayed at the top of the screen. In the Relative mode, an arrow moves around the screen to show the camera's direction relative to the monitor. Knowing the camera's direction simplifies focusing on specific bottom structure and positioning your bait on the monitor."

As far as down view goes, I've found this very useful for ice fishing and, in fact, was the predominant orientation that I used last year. It helps you see the fish come in from all directions, and you can really tell how your presentation effects those fish. There are often quite a few fish around, and it is interesting to see how the pack moves. Also, you don't have to have your camera at the same depth as your bait, which might help in keeping the camera from spooking the fish. If you have the camera at the same level as your bait, you can't see the fish from behind you unless you turn it. Whether this is by remote control from above, or within the camera, I don't think it really matters. If you have to use your hand to turn the camera when a fish is interested, it increases the odds in you missing that fish. Plus, I really think you'd draw down the battery if you're constantly turning the camera to see what is behind you.

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I've used the Marcum a few times now and the direction indicator does, indeed, seem to work like a compass (telling which way the camerea is pointing, n.s.e.w). This is from the Marcum VS560 user manual:

"The direction indicator has an arrow that points in the direction the camera is viewing regardless of the monitor position." "This is accomplished by the use of two magnetic compasses that talk back and forth through software that continuously calculate the diferential...." The monitor must be flat and level for it to be accurate so if you're walking around with it, the manual says, it will give inaccurate readings. The camera direction indicator won't work proporly if the montior is more than 10 degrees from level. smile.gif

Of course, I could be wrong, I am lots, and may have misinterpreted the manual. More experience with the camera will tell me for sure how it works.

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Pete, one of the main advantages of downviewing is it reducing setup time. You can use the camara out of the hole you are fishing, so you don't need to set up with a seperate hole, It saves time therefore making you more mobile. Ice fished legend Dave Genz developed this technique. The 560 does help reduce set up time for side viewing with the turning camara head though.

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I always use a third hole for the camera and prefer to view from the side. So it takes another 20 seconds to drill a hole, that isn't an issue for me... If you get a good fish on you may wish your camera wasn't down the same hole as your line! I've tried the top viewing and I just don't care for the view. From the side, it also allows me to look at both lines. Just rotate between the two baits. Just a personal preference thing I guess..

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Maybe our different opinions on down-viewing vs. side-viewing are based on water clarity. I like to down-view on Mille Lacs, where I'll have the camera a good 10 feet or so off the bottom and still be able to clearly see the bait and fish. It's particularly useful for perch fishing, as you can play keep away from the little ones and let the big ones come in from afar. A lot of times I'll see the bigger perch, or walleyes, 5 or 6 feet away from the bait and slowly sneaking up along the bottom. And other times, I'll see the big fish come come within 5 feet again, but move off as my presentation has spooked them. It's a good technique to learn how to attract the bigger fish, and see how they respond from further distances.

I can understand why you wouldn't do it as much in murky water, but it is an excellent technique when the water is clear and you ought to give it a shot. It is good to be able to see fish a full 360 degrees around your bait, and not have to turn a camera by means of remote control or by hand.

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