Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
the squirrel

lead head jigs & loons

5 posts in this topic

Watched a news story last night showing the effects of lead poising and loons. Needless to say it was disturbing! What is the alternative out there guys?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did see the same report. I have a hard time believing that a jig , especially the size they used in the film , would be injested by a loon or any other diving waterfowl. I would expect that the hook would do more damage than the long term effect of lead poisening. Split shot on the other hand would be easier for them to swallow. I do not own or have not tried to purchase any of the bismuth jigs or split shot. I do use some of the brass and steel bullet sinkers for live bait rigging.
Dino

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many companies are working on alternatives to lead. We'll see the day when lead is all but absent from the marketplace. Its adverse affects in the ecosystem have been well documented.

There was a pretty spirited discussion here on this subject in the spring. I suspect there might be another. As for me, I'll try to make the voluntary switch and hope we don't move so far as to have compulsory legislation -- the key to it all is the manufacture. Put the spinnerbaits, jigs, split-shot, bottom bouncers and the rest in the marketplace and I'll buy them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a previous tackle manufacturer I do know more than most about this subject. One of the major problems with switching to all non-toxics is not only the fact that bismuth is so rediculasly expensive ... another major factor is that our lead melting equipment and probably molds ( not sure on this ) wont work with bismuth. Not to mention the specialy tools for working with lead. Steel is much cheaper than bismuth, but this poses all of the same problems and a few different problems, and the weight to size ratio is far different.

Please dont take me wrong. I would have loved to work with all non-toxics if it were possible on tackle manufacturing, but it wasnt. It would cost an incredible amount of money to come up with the products to switch over... not to mention pay to design the products that do not exist as of yet. Unless we are all prepared to spend $25 a spinnerbait, or $6 for a bottom bouncer ,, we need to let technology catch up a little bit and provide equipment for manufacturers to use. I guarantee there are people working on designing these products as I speak. But they are not readily available yet.

We need Bill Gates to become a tackle equipment manufacturer .. he is about the only one that could afford to *speed things up*. Other than that its going to take huge investments from many companies to make this happen. Even then this is going to take time.

Fishing cant be just a sport for the rich. If the price is too high for the tackle once a ban would ever happen there would be countless individuals out there cooking lead producing tackle for anyone that would pay .. overall the ecosystem wouldnt be protected in the least bit.

I agree the lead isnt good for animals, birds, or humans alike. But a solution has to be reached that will work for everyone within reasonable guidelines. Including small tackle companies or tackle makers that have to provide for their families off the proceeds, who also provide just enough competition to the big tacklemakers to keep prices reasonable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Companies are already producing substitute material tackle -- and they are not getting outrageous prices.

No one said it would happen overnight. But, it will happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • ZachD
      Try the Sherburne wildlife refuge plenty of places you can get to were not a lot of people want to go the spot I deer hunt you need hip waders to get to
    • ZachD
    • Borch
      We've done well in late June.   May need to move offshore more.  Cranks or spinners till you find fish then slow down if needed.   I use the public access.  Not usually too busy mid summer. 
    • h8go4s
      Blue_Healer (Shouldn't that be heeler, not healer? http://www.dogster.com/dog-breeds/Blue_Heeler ) "Thanks for the advice. Nobody else would help."   Me: "You're welcome. Did you check the websites I referenced? Did you stop at any boat dealers? "
    • Walleye #1
        With the big winds this week we were not able to venture out as far, so not a whole lot to report from the Main Lake.  When it isn’t blowing too hard, the main lake rock reefs were kicking out nice Leech Lake walleyes in 14-18 feet of water.  Pulling lindy rigs with crawlers or leeches as well as slow death at .5-.8 mph was the best.  Speed is the key when dialing in these fish.  Our Leech Lake fishing guides found a nice mix of eaters and bigger fish.   Still many of the same places as last week were producing in North Bar, Fletchers, Ivans, Submarine, etc, but don’t forget to look for secondary reefs and humps that are nearby or if the fish are not on the edges of those reefs look to the mud basins where the bug hatches are taking place and drive until you graph fish.   On the west end of the lake in Walker Bay and Agency Bays, shoreline breaks that had wind blowing in were the best.  14-20ft of water is where we keyed in on.  Pulling lindy rigs with chubs, leeches, or crawlers all worked to put a nice mix of walleyes and even some nice pike in the boat.  Other areas to key in on would be under water points and bars that run out into the bays and have deep water right next to them the bigger fish like to suspend and then come in and feed during these times.  
    • Walleye #1
      Always worth it to go fishing.  That time of year your best bet from what your schedule sounds like would be to put crank baits on and trolling the edges and tops of the reefs or do some slip bobber fishing down on that end of the lake.  Huddles Reef, Variety, Olsons, etc. would all be places to start, but the crankbait bite can be good.    
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Big Hatches usually get the slow bite over in a hurry! Hopefully this will only last a few more days! Boated 22 walleyes today but only managed to keep 7 small eaters in 6 hours of fishing. Cliff
    • monstermoose78
      They used to have a nice gun range but some stupid locals shot their garage and blamed the range!
    • gunner55
      I'm only 8-10 miles south of smurfy with the same experience on the lake. Mn Fishing Pros is a group of 4 guys who guide in the area & so is Jeff Sundin. Not sure what any of them have for experience on that lake but you might try to contact 1 of them to see if they have a opening that fits your time slot or they might even have some info on the lake that they are willing to share 
    • Wheres_Walter
      Headed up this weekend and next weekend.  WIll be fishing mostly Frazer.  Sounds like the hatch is on.  If anyone has been fishing walleye on frazer in the past few days, got any tips on depth?  Presentation?     Sounds like crawlers are the ticket right now.   Thanks