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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

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NEUT6899

What rain gear to buy??

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NEUT6899

Looking to replace my rain coat and was wondering what opinions i could get from everyone.. I havent really looked around yet so not sure what i want. Looking to spend up to $150 or so. Whats the best bang for my buck??

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Jmeyers

I asked this question a few months agao, a lot of people were for Frog togs...I havem't ended up getting anyhting yet. Do a search and a bunch of posts regarding this topic should pop up

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Slob_Samurai

If you are referring to the frog toggs that have a paper like fabric DO NOT buy those. My year after year progression.

-Frog toggs (pay for the shipping and I will mail you the jacket) smile

-gander guide series

-goretex jacket/bibs (very warm), columbia raintech (light-weight)

Very happy with my current gear, invest in a good set-up now you will end up saving money in the long run.

PS.. Check out the columbia outlet in Alberville if you are ever in the neighborhood. Great deals on jackets.

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TruthWalleyes

Looking to replace my rain coat and was wondering what opinions i could get from everyone.. I havent really looked around yet so not sure what i want. Looking to spend up to $150 or so. Whats the best bang for my buck??

I've got two pairs that work in all conditions.

1st is Helly Hanson, or HH. $140 coat and bibs. Tough exterior, haven't ripped them yet and I can't believe it.

But, in 90 degree summer rains...those are too hot.

So i've got frog toggs all camo coat and BIBS...Very important to get bibs with frog toggs as the coats are short.

They're very light, and easy to pack. I think i paid around $70 for the coat and bibs. (BTW, i waited 2 years for the camo bibs to come out before buying frog toggs..I think they got the point after emailing them about a hundred times!!)

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NEUT6899

I already had Frog Toggs crossed of my list. I will spend a little more than i want to to make sure i have quality. I never thought of the outlet in Albertville. I might have to make a quick trip down there.

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NEUT6899

I can understand the Frog Toggs in the Summer months because they are so light weight and will be cooler...

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mnviking28

I have a set of Guide Wear from the big "C". I realize that they are above the price point you are looking to spend, but if you watch the sales, you can get them close to $200 per piece. I have had a set for 12 years now. Never have ripped them, and I have used them for everything from late season ice to fall pheasant hunting (not exactly their intended use) and the seams in the bibs are just starting to seep now. I have had a few of the suits that are around that $100-$150 price point, I seem to get about 3-4 years out of them and then they start to leak. So, for a few bucks more, I think they are definitely worth it.

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EBass

Frogg Togg's are like wearing a plastic bag that doesn't fit well and rides up. I have a pair and they sit in the garage. I bought some Gander Guide bib's and jacket and they leak too. I need to get new rain gear, and heard good things about the Cabela's brand.

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Down Deep

Cabelas GuideWare is way out of your stated price range. However, looking long term my GuideWare is going on its 16th season which add value to the original cost. I use it all he time for rain and wind protection. Cabelas has a goretex line that is called Rainy River which sells for about $200 per suit, but they frequently put it on sale. Gander also has several suits that will meet your price range.

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JohnMickish

I've got two sets of rain suits, one is the Cabelas "guide series" and the other is the Frabill FXE. Each piece is a tad over your $150 limit but I wouldn't use anything less. I can honestly fish 8 hours in the rain and stay bone dry, and comfortable.

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vern

Last Fall I got a brand new set of Guide Wear for about $160. I originally paid about $240 for the jacket & bibs on sale. The price dropped even more a week later so I visited the store & they gave me an $80 credit. Check the bargain cave! You might have to wait until Fall to see another deal like that though.

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Wish-I-Were-Fishn

I believe Cabelas has more then one Guide Series. What are you guys buying?

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vern

I bought the Guidewear (non-insulated). I know this set retailed for over $500 so it was an amazing deal. They even threw in large tackle bag for free!

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Wish-I-Were-Fishn

Get the best you can afford and then throw in a set of Frogg Toggs for in the boat. The more I use mine the more I realize they have their place. Not as a primary set, but very handy for backup. Fits so big I can wear the jacket over my PDF. Handy to throw on to block the wind too.

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Shorelunch

I just saw on the G Mtn website that their "GSX" line of raincoats are $75 and their bibs are $70 (via their website).

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NEUT6899

Has anyone heard of the Onxy outdoor gear??? just wondering if it is quality...

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delcecchi

I tend to go with the old saying I heard on the internet...

"Buy the good tool, cry once. Buy the cheap tool, cry every time you use it" Or something like that.

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MIDNIGHT777

Cabelas guidewear for me. I know it is very expensive, but well worth it. You will have it forever. Plus cabelas has a lifetime warranty on their product. I just returned a 3 year old jacket without a receipt that had a broken zipper with no questions, bam new jacket. Gander tech20 is also a very good product at a price closerer to your budget. I had the gm bibs and jacket and after about 5 years it started to lose it water repellent.

Matt

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Fish&Fowl

Depending on what size you are I have a jacket I've been looking to sell. It's a Gamehide parka and retails for around $200. It's an extra and the one I have has kept me bone dry through 12-hour days of rain/wind.

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Hoffer

I have a pair of the tech H2o series. Was great for a few years and then lost its water proofness. I then treated it with Grangers wash. It washed the repellency back in. Then you also spray it. I got rained on quite a bit last year and it kept me dry. I just worry that next time out or a year of sitting in storage may warrant another treatment. I also have a simple basic waterproof light weight coat and pants that I keep in the storage locker of the boat at all times. Has kept me dry in downpour. I just wouldnt use them to wear all day long in bad weather. last, and I got bashed about bringing this up on a prior post - but if you buy a really good raingear of any brand dont hang it on a hanger. I am just telling you what the clothing person told me. I guess when hanging them for long periods of time it "stretches" out the fibers and this is what breaks the seal of the waterproof barrier. This clothing person told me to instead lay them flat in storage. Again, dont bash the messenger this is just what I was told smile

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Geiber

Frogg Toggs are amazing! Not only are they rain resistant, but they are amazing at blocking wind, for how thin they are they sure are warm! Like Truthwalleyes said though the coat is very short, and the elastic causes it to rise up and stay up, so definitely get the pants/bibs with them as well! Also maybe even a size bigger.

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Wish-I-Were-Fishn

Frogg Toggs are amazing! Not only are they rain resistant, but they are amazing at blocking wind, for how thin they are they sure are warm! Like Truthwalleyes said though the coat is very short, and the elastic causes it to rise up and stay up, so definitely get the pants/bibs with them as well! Also maybe even a size bigger.

A size bigger? They already fit like a tent! That is one of my beefs about them is the fit. Don't know who they measured to get their sizes, but dang!

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Buck_Hunter04

Grundens.... U will never have to buy another pair ever. Maybe just a pair of suspenders. Mine lasted 10 salmon seasons in Alaska.

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crappie55409

Im a little crazy when it comes to gear. I have 3 rain gear outfits (one doubles as my ice fishing gear).

-mens guide gear ice parka and bibs (great for fall fishing on the river when its real cold)

-carhart rain jacket and bibs (These are heavy duty and pretty awesome. Got them on sale for 70 dollars total. These do the job well and are somewhat warm, the downside is they are rather heavy)

-cabelas brand light jacket and pants for summer months

I also have a medium warm jacket. What i would honestly recommend is checking out the bargain cave at cabelas (inside of the store is where you find the deals not on their website). I got a full rain suit (cabelas brand) I use all summer for 7 dollars!!! Also check out thrift stores. I found a 2000 gram waterproof insulated jacket the other month for 7 bucks. I was looking at getting essentially the same thing at cabelas for 140. Anyway, it seems you are in the market for a high end suit. My advice would be to get something on the warmer side for all around use and then find a less expensive light suit for the days its 90 degrees. I would trust cabelas over other retailers

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    • Rick
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