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arcticcat400

wood stove in garage

11 posts in this topic

i have an old wood stove and wanted to put it in my garage there used to be one in there so the old chimney is still there but we blown in insulation since and i wondered if it would be alright to scrape the insulation away from the pipe a waise and still use the old pipe or if we would need to run a whole new pipe?

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First step I would consider is your insurance. My agent told me wood stoves properly installed in a house are ok. Not so in garages, because you don't tend them often enough. He said they would drop coverage for stoves in garage and outbuilding.

If the chimney present is in good condition, properly installed and maintained, and of the type that the insulation can contact, it would be fine. Best to have an expert consult your particular situation before firing it up.

Good luck, Brent

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I did a install,I followed all house rules with insulated pipe( expensive stuff mine was free from neighbor)Asked insurance rep. and I'm covered,but my install was to all rules and codes.

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Dosn't sound like you have a chimmy, rather stove pipe.

The attic space and above the roof line should be insulated. You can go to the big building centers, pick up a pamphlet about installation of insulated chimney(pipe). It'll give you all the info you need.

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As stated, check with your insurance company. I bought a house that already had a wood stove in the garage. Insurance company found out about it and threatened to drop coverage unless it was removed immediately. I called around to all insurance companies I could find and none would cover any type of wood fired heating device in a garage, period...

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Good for me, bad for jerkin'm. grin.gif I bought his woodstove and love it...

My insurance agent visited my home and as long as I am up to code on the chimney, I am covered.

I have asbestos insulated stove pipe from the ceiling thru the roof, and it is not cheap, but it's worth it in safety. You will also need the necessary heat sheilds in the ceiling, insulation in the attic and roof. Find out what the codes are before proceeding.

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I'm in that biz and can offer some advise.

First of all make sure that the pipe that runs through the ceiling, attic and roofline is a class a chimney system. It can be the solid packed insulated type or air cooled. The blown in insulation should be at least two inches from the pipe. This is done with an attic insulation shield, or you can bend a piece of metal flashing in a loop around it to hold the insulation away.

You have to be somewhat careful about a stove in a garage. If the stove is using room air for combustion watch out for flammable items stored in the garage ( gas cans, solvents etc.) If the stove has a knock out on it to hook up an outside air duct i would use it.

I have found insurance companies to be as different as people are. Dont accept one companies rules. There are many to choose from. Garages are little tougher to get insured with a stove. But do not ever accept an insurance company to not let you use a stove in your house if everything is put in per code. If they tell you that you can't, get another insurance company. There are many who will allow it.

One more thing. If the stove is UL listed there should be a metal tag pop riveted to the back with diagrams showing acceptable clearances to walls etc. If its not UL listed ... I would get one that is.

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The code also calls for 18" elevation on any ignition source in a garage.

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Does that 18' pertain to wood stoves? My impression of it was H2o heaters, furnacess etc. gas ignition for proper air supply. CO2 and some others settle down,Heavier than air.term ignition source?? wood stove manual ignition.Call the local inspector before instalation.

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Yes, the 18" is in both the IMC (international mechanical code), covering both solid fuel and liquid fuel & IFGC (International fuel gas code) covering gaseous fuel. It has nothing to do with combustion air for the furnace or wood stove, it's because flammable vapors from gasoline are heaver than air. How they came up with 18", I do not know.

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Thanks Mn nice, mines not 18" but when installing for ins. purposes i got the Inspector involved and OKd.The clearences on UL label with (Wolfganze pood spelling) stated legs provided with stove meet clearance. UMM?

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