Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
harvey lee

How tigh a group is needed to be good?

8 posts in this topic

I zero'd in my .223 this past week and am wondering how much better I need to be with this gun. Its a Remington .223 700 heavy barreled varmit rifle. The group at 100 yards is 1 inch high and 6 shots within a 1.25 inch circle. Where will I be with a 200 yard shot with this gun and do I need to have a tighter group?

I would guess my pattern is tight enough and that my group at 200 yards should be at zero with a .223.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say that your dead on at 200 yards. I'm guessing when I say your grouping would be 6 shots within 3 inches.

I just had my T/C .223 "out back" the other day to see if it was on. I wanted something with some effect at a distance, so I found a box of cherry jello that I put into a gallon milk jug with water and set it out at approx. 175 yards. I pulled the trigger and got the red mist I was looking for. Now if I only could have called in a 'yote Friday night before the snow melted I would've been happy.

We were completely surrounded at our second stand. But they winded us and never came into range. I've never heard so many 'yotes in one area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

harvey, how many different brands of ammo did you try? I know it is expensive but I bet there is a brand of ammo out there that will shrink that group to under 1 inch. also, were you shooting off of a stable base with good rests underneath the front of the gun and a small bag under the stock end as well?

did you drink a lot of coffee that morning? did you hang out with boilerguy all weekend??? \:D (had to throw that one in)

Your groups sound really good and I say you have a dead coyote out to 250 or more. the drop at 300 is probably 6.5 inches.

try some other ammo.....by the way, don't pitch the brass, I'll take it.

I would try the hornady 55gr. vmax varmint loads. my gun really loves vmax's

p.s. I am not kidding about the brass. It is worth the drive for me...... grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did shoot from a bench rest and was very steady. I shot only one brand and that was Black Hills ammo 52 grain match hp. I have a guy that is going to give me 5 different type ammo rounds of 5 each to test some different ammo. I was just wondering how good my first group was.

Thanks for the help. I dont know if I need a tack driver but I may as well get this gun shooting as well as it can.

Yes, I was with Boilerguy this weekend but I didnt get poisened by that PBR he drinks. Yes, maybe a little to much coffee in the morning also. I am happy with the results but I may be able to hit the nail on the head so to speak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

your groups are fine and you will be amazed at what different ammo will do.........I am assuming this is a brand new gun, my AR-15 didn't settle in until 200+ rounds were sent down range. You are headed in the right direction. Of course you should have tried a few PBR's that could have negated the coffee...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The gun has maybe 30 rounds through it. In all of my other rifles I have tested numerous different ammo brands and have always found that onwe brand will shoot a bit tighter pattern. Sometimes its just alot of work and money to get a gun to shoot a very tight group but in the end I have always been very happy with the results.

I'am going to wait until we get some warmer weather and go back to the range and fire off a few more rounds to see if I can achieve a better group.

Maybe the PBR and NO coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom, I didn't think about it, I have a couple of boxes of brass here, I could have given them to you.

Send me an email about it.

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harvey Lee, warmer weather, sighting in and pbr, that sounds like a full day......your groups are really good right now, once the barrel is shot in, you'll think that group is the size of a paper plate.

Val, I'll email ya, the copilot plugs are the same as my powerdrive, can't wait for open water now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11
      Well thinking that I will give it a try thaks for all the input. Will post again if I get out.
    • CigarGuy
      Cook, MN facebook page has a picture and info on it.  I don't know how to post a link, but here's the post-minus the photo.   The combination of record mild temperatures in late February and more seasonable temperatures in early March, has prompted dramatic ice movement on Lake Vermilion.... The south shore of Birch Point, which faces Big Bay, has seen some of the most extensive damage, as the ice has twisted lift docks, damaged boat houses, downed trees, and rearranged sizeable chunks of shoreline. Only a handful of docks along the heavily-developed lakeshore have so far escaped damage from the ice. Many docks have been damaged beyond repair. The pressure of expanding ice is typically relieved out in the lake, where large pressure ridges often form. But those ridges didn’t form as usual this year, and that left the shorelines vulnerable to the immense power of expanding ice. Lake property owners are likely to be shocked when they arrive back at their cabins and lake homes later this year. And the cost of repairs could be especially painful since, in many cases, the damage is likely not covered by insurance. “It will depend on their individual policies,” said Donna Mosher, with the Tower-Soudan Agency, which serves many Lake Vermilion property owners. She said standard insurance policies typically don’t cover ice movement, which can be a frequent source of property damage in areas where thick ice builds up in winter. Many property owners on Vermilion and other larger area lakes have turned to lift-out docks to minimize their risk of damage, but this year’s unusual conditions are leaving many of those docks damaged or destroyed as well. Some property owners do obtain insurance that includes a specific schedule or rider to cover more expensive docks, according to Mosher, but that’s usually the exception rather than the rule. “I’ve had to tell people ‘no’ already,” said Mosher. “It’s unfortunate.”
    • T-water
      The good news is you can't lose!  Let us know what you decide.
    • tacklejunkie
          Downriggers are not necessary but if you use them this time of year, don't go down  deep. I used to use boards but they were more complicated for others on my boat to use so it's small dipseys off the side or a clean line straight back. Spoons and sticks work well this time of year   Shallow and high. One year, I ran DR in the spring with the counter reading 6 feet.  
    • Musky hunter 82
      No problem, I always try to help out another fisherman whenever I can.  Squarebill crankbaits 12# fluoro would be good, but if you're talking lipless crankbaits I'd run that on 17# as well.  Here's how I have my baitcasters setup:   6'6" MH - 50# braid (Swim jigs, and topwater frogs) 7' MH - 15# mono with a  18" - 17# fluoro leader (Spinnerbaits/Chatterbaits) 7' MH - 17# fluoro (Jigs, Lipless Crankbaits) 7' M - 12# fluoro (Squarebill crankbaits)   Worms, tubes, jerkbaits and topwater poppers I use a spinning rod