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NightWarrior

Do you eat?

7 posts in this topic

Do any of you eat watch you catch out of the red? If so whats ur preferred pounds or size?

I keep only up to 3lbs.

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I've eaten plenty of them in the past. However, I tend to put almost everything I catch out of the river back. I have no major concerns about the quality of the fish, I just love the idea of catching each fish when it gets a little bigger. For me, I never keep anything bigger than 18 or 19 inches, and that applies to my river fishing too.

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YOu should check the DNR website on PCB and Mercury level for the Red River, then decide what you can and cannot eat and how often...

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The lakes seem to have more murcury than the river.

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was out on the red this evening, caught 2 perfect 'eaters' 15" and 18", however I don't eat fish from the Red, partly because I question the sanitation, but mostly because I get more enjoyment releasing those fish, so 'back water eddy' can catch her when she's a 30" hog!

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Irony....2 days after I post that I don't eat the 'perfect eaters' that I catch on the Red, I get caught biting my lip. This evening (which was beautiful by the way 40 degrees!) the second 18" walleye that I pulled from the Red had a buckshot treble lodged in its stomach.

I used surgeon like precision to try remove the treble but I knew the damage was too severe the moment I saw it. I gave it a solid 4-6 minute nursing in the cold silty waters of the Red, but it was too late. So.....there are cases (rare) that I will eat fish from the Red.

***side note, I looked up the Mercury levels of the Red, and the DNR lists them on par with that of Devils Lake***

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The larger the fish, the greater the danger of contaminants built up in the meaty tissue. It transfers from fat to meat with age. Fatter the fish, the heavier the contaminant load you will consume.

The safest bet is to eat smaller fish, no matter what species.

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