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Dahitman44

G20, G22 shooting issues

11 posts in this topic

A couple of people on other threads have said they had trouble shooting their Glocks -- wondering if any others have changes the sights and if it made a difference?

Any and all thoughts, please.

Thanks

Hit

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Some people have a hard time with glocks when they first get them. If you are limp wristed your glock will act up. From the elbows down you have to keep consistant form. This shouldn't be a problem if you have shooting experience.

I did not like the "post and dot" factory sites on my g23 so I had trijicon 3 dot greens put on. After adjusting for windage the gun shoots great. I have shot thousands of rounds threw it, as many as 250 in a day and have never had a jam, failure to feed, failure to fire, nothing.

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Good to hear --

anyone else?

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i completly agree with neighbor guy. cause it did take me awhile to get use to my G22 until i switched the sights on it and now i seem to do a hole heck of a lot better.

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I am going to look for that.

thanks

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Hitman:

What do you mean by "trouble shooting"? I might be able to give you some suggestions as I am a certified Glock armorer and firearms instructor. Is the weapon failing to operate correctly or is the operator failing \:\) Where are the rounds hitting in relation to where you are aiming?

I am not saying this is true in your case...but in my experience, the vast majority of shooting problems has little to nothing to do with the actual weapon. It can be traced back to the basic stuff. Stance, grip, sight alignment, trigger pull, flinching..etc. I would rule out the above before moving the sights on the weapon.

As far as sights go...that is something worth checking into. I have the three dot night sight system on my 22c and its ok. If you go with such a system, make sure you get rear night sights that are of a different color or shape as compared to front....sounds like common sense but for example, I have seen people sometimes struggle to put the three "green dots" in the correct order while shooting under little to no stress in low light or no light conditions

let me know if I can help you

Cliffy

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cliffy,

I have a Paraordance .45, I shoot consistantly high and right, I would appreciate any suggestions. I do not have this issue with other handguns/calibers.

Thanks,

fwt

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Cliffy --

It is almost always low. I am getting used to the trigger but it is a work in progress.

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Low and Low to the Right (if you are a right hand shooter) is a classic sign of flinching or anticipating the recoil of the weapon. I have struggled with this same problem for a long time.

A couple of things that might help ya. First, get your hands on some dummy rounds. You can buy them at most places that sell ammo. Get with a buddy and have him load your mags so you don't have a clue if the round in the chamber is live or inert. Then just shoot and you will see how much of a flinch you really have....it can be amazing to really see.

Some of the best LE shooters I have ever had the pleasure to work with were from my days on the RRV SWAT Team. We would often use this method in practice. It was truly amazing to see a great shooter pull the trigger on a dummy round. The gun never even twitched. I didn't even know they pulled the trigger...only realized they did pull the trigger because they had gone into the tap and rack mode of getting the gun hot again. Amazing!

Also, work on trigger reset. Meaning, once you pull the trigger, hold it back and don't let it go forward. Once you are ready, slowly let it go forward until you hear the click of the trigger reset. This will take all the slack or slop out of the trigger for the next round. I sometimes see students slapping the trigger on the Glocks because there is so much up-take. This tip really help me when I was struggling with this problem.

I tell you what Hitman, once spring rolls around.....we can hook up and I will take you up to the Moorhead Range and we can work on this issue. Who knows, maybe I am totally wrong and there is another cause for the low shooting.

Take care

Cliffy

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 Originally Posted By: fishwithteeth
cliffy,

I have a Paraordance .45, I shoot consistantly high and right, I would appreciate any suggestions. I do not have this issue with other handguns/calibers.

Thanks,

fwt

I gotta be honest, I am lost for an answer. Seems odd that it only happens with this weapon? Is this the biggest caliber hand gun you shoot? Not seeing you shoot....I am taking a wild guess...but if its isolated to only this gun...could it be the sights or how you are making your sight alignment?

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Cliffy --

I was really hoping you were going to say that. I would really like the help.

Thanks

Hit

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