Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
b1gf1sh1

point to ponder

6 posts in this topic

everybody who fishes hears things over and over about certain ways to catch different fish,sometimes we observe things ourselves. we may blow off some, untill we hear it enough times that it actually sounds like a good idea. kind of like somebody you don't know telling you that you have a tail. most would just shrug it off, say he's nut's and keep walking. then another would say it and we might figure it's some kind of joke or something. but by the time five or six tell us that we got a tail, almost all of us would have looked to see what the heck was going on back there. crazy.gif so goes it with fishing tips. my question is about something i've observed. i have my own predetermined ideas as to why it is so, but i'm interested in hearing what others think, know for sure, or just have an oppinion about it. it is about Walleye and Walleye only.(depth is irrelevent) o.k. here goes. i see shad/emeralds near shore inside eddies in almost total dead water. i fish and fish but get very few fish, and the ones i do get are not large enough to call a trophy. but if i find some pretty good current and there are about as many shad/emeralds at the edges and i fish that area with different presentations, like, jig, crank, threeway with crank just hanging letting current create action...etc. i get much better results? why do you think i get bigger fish near and in the current? like i said i have my own thoughts on this but i want to hear what others think before i write it out. my theory is multi-faceted and extremely complex so feel free to confuse confused.gif me.also for a throw in ... why do you think pods of emeralds are almost always over the top of pods of shad?(besides the fact they live in the top 3 feet almost exclusively) cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nobody has any theories? mabe everybody's fishing. smirk.gif ok no biggy i'll wait a little bit longer for some theories from peeps then give mine and accept any critiques confused.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

i see shad/emeralds near shore inside eddies in almost total dead water. i fish and fish but get very few fish, and the ones i do get are not large enough to call a trophy. but if i find some pretty good current and there are about as many shad/emeralds at the edges and i fish that area... ...why do you think pods of emeralds are almost always over the top of pods of shad?(besides the fact they live in the top 3 feet almost exclusively)


Hey biggie, I'm thinking the reason you have better luck when you see the bait fish on the edges of current is because the fish are down there attacking and causing disarray, the shad you see are re-schooling on the outside edges trying to live another day. The shad in the dead water are probably feeding, not as likely under attack by monsters. The emerald/shad stack is because they are likely feeding together, one probably leads the other. I'll ask some of the fish next time I'm out..

LB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its an easy meal.

Fish want to eat, and they want to do it while expending as little energy as possible (they really don't like current). Most river fish love these seams as they can sit in the slack water and pick off the food as it comes by in the current. An eddy or current seam is a vertical (left/right) seam in the river. Same happens at holes, behind humps, etc, except the seam is now horizontal (up/down). A lot of river fish will tuck up in the front of the hole so they can be out of the current yet still grab that easy meal.

Current also equals oxygen which is more important in the summer months when high water temps and slack water equal low oxygen content.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks mr. blue and mr.hanson. i knew i'd sucker someone into telling me why grin.gif... nah really... both great answers and part of what i've observed. keep in mind anything you read is only what i think is going on and not the result of any deep scientific study by me, mostly while sipping coffee and eating donuts trying to figure out why that piggy hit here . to start large walleye are large because they are old. which means they've been eating for awhile. (bear with me and the obvious stuff crazy.gif) during their life they have eaten in alot of ways and areas. smaller walleyes, 20'' and under, are young (or males)and have'nt really figured out the whole eating game yet. bait fish in wide open spaces escape predaters much easier because of several reasons. just a few of these would be. they can escape in a 360 degree sphere around them as there is no ''trapping'' areas. they can feel the ''wave'' from an attacking fish comming for them, they can see an attack better when they are'nt stressed, huge pods of shad in a concentrated area would deplete avalable oxygen making that area undesireable. mabe a few more but let's stop there. all of these make it not worth the energy spent to grt the meal. in current a baitfish (especially wide boddied) is out of control and easily rendered helpless. (from what i've seen) that makes it an easy meal. mainly what i have seen is pods of shad (rememmber this is in current not dead water bars, humps or fast water holes) near the edge of fast water,within 15 feet, jumping all over heck. these i assume(oops tongue.gif) are feeding fish below them. as they are getting messed up they scatter away. some away from the current some to it. the ones that get terrorized into the current now become as helpless as can be. the current is tossing them around like rag dolls and now are easy money. bigger walleye and older males know this and i believe are the ones feeding directly in the current. about 4-5 feet in the current from the edge is where i get most larger fish. i fish in several ways and the results are ''almost'' allways the same. in essence every defense that a baitfish had out of that current is now moot. once they were herded there it's over. bigger fish learn over time not to bother with that whole chase em around thing. i think piggy's hang close to schools of smaller walleye, sheephead(in river), whites and others and feed off the baitfish that are herded into that current by them. that way they expend almost no energy- wink.gifsly old broads- getting their meals. i say this because when i upsize my lures untill i stop getting those smaller 'eyes i get the trophy's(rarely). this is how i got my 34 1/2'' 14 1/2 lb. Sow(released) a few years back. and my 33''ers and several from 28 to 32. i've read piggy's don't school like smaller fish. maybe, maybe not. jury's out on this one. i could say yes they do because of several piggy's caught in one area and say no because they just might be following the same pattern, and it's a coincidence.who knows? of course just the fact there is current and shad don't mean just smaller walleye are there and no big. and mabe big ones are there and no small ones. mabe none.who knows. i use this pattern and get skunked(as you seen blue, and yes this is what i was trying to do we just never even got a little one mad.gif) also i think because of the size of a piggy they are less affected by current. i know large muskie and pike and cat's are'nt as affected and prefer to munch in current, from what i've observed. same i think is true for big walleye. as far as emeralds being over the top of shad i think it has mostly to do with defense. emeralds are the premier food in this river. the shad below get eaten first, and alert the emeralds to attacking fish by going nut's. mabe this is why when i drop an emerald just below the shad it's almost always a sure immediate fish. drop a shad in same spot and it could be a fish fast or a short wait. and a fatty or crappie dropped gets nothing or a very long wait till one does eat it. i think it's defensive. and blue i tried asking a fish once ... what's glub, glip,glub, gluuuub, ploop ploop mean? confused.gif man i'm bored. must be a million words here. anybody else have some current catching stories? rememmber the tail tale above. the more we hear it the more we will start looking. grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect this might be a forage thing with the Emeralds and other bait fish. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that minnows are both prey fish and predator fish. They eat tiny things like zooplankton and phytoiplankton that get blown around by wind and current and eventualy get stacked up a long the shore in eddys and slack water places. The minnows follow the plankton to feed and the walleyes and otehr larger predator fish follow the minnows. This is , of course, the Food Chain we all studied in Biology class in school. I won't say I am right about this, but that would be my guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Juan Grande
      What's the flow like on the Rum, Moose?
    • Avid Angler
      Hi guys and gals,   Does anyone know much about this lake? I don't fish this area of the state. We are looking to stay at Cedar Point Resort for a week. Just want to get to know the lake for what it is.   Is it a bass, northern, pan fish or walleye lake? Or all of the above? The surveys don't look that impressive.   Any good guides in the area?   Thanks.   Avid
    • portageguy
      The bite is on in Trout lake. Remote lake walleye fishing has been good. A leech or crawler has  been producing nice fish. This last week Trout lake has been good for lake trout, walleye and bass. A camper had caught and released a 44 inch pike. Bass fishermen reported 100 fish days.   The Y-store is looking into taking on BWCA permits. Please encourage and support them to do so. 
    • delcecchi
      On many lakes it is possible to rent a boat for a reasonable price.  Or to hire a guide who knows the area and the lakes. 
    • Sunset Lodge
      Hello from the NW Angle of Lake of the Woods!

      Here in Minnesota, water temps are in the low to mid 60’s and the Walleyes keep rollin’ in! Wind blown shorelines are giving up walleyes via leeches and crank-baits right along the weed line. Crawlers on a gold and/or orange spinner are producing fish out of the mud between 22 and 26 feet. Jigging has been tough this week with the strong winds, but the Mayflies have finally tapered off!!
       
      Up on the Canadian side, bottom bouncing has been filling the live wells outside of monument bay between 24-28 feet.  Jigging near Skeet and Kennedy Islands have seen nice sized walleye and numerous perch. Great smallmouth action can currently be had in Tranquil channel and the mouth of Johnston passage. Muskie fishing is still sporadic with high 40” class fish being caught from shallow bottom bays or just outside of them. 

      Fish of the Week:
      49" and 46" Muskie
      40" Pike
      At least 10 Walleye over 25" 

      We hope to see you soon! Sunset Lodge
    • monstermoose78
      This is close to home for me. I love the dunes, but the refuge is messed up. The refuge told me they were brining native game birds back, so I was excited and said sharptailed grouse and the guy looked and me and said no ringnecked pheasants. I laughed at him and said really he said yes really. I told him ringnecked pheasants are invasive species he argued they are native and I walked out shaking my head.    The refuge could be a strong hold for sharptailed grouse, prairie chickens, and water fowl if they managed for them. The dune could extend this area. 
    • CaptainSeabass
      G'day guys, I've started up this post as I will be visiting Minnesota (to be specific the Stuart Lake in the Ottertail Lake area) and I would love to hook into some fish! I'm originally from the Netherlands, have lived in Australia for the last 8 years working as a fishing guide, I have moved to Dallas TX with my wife and now we will be visiting my in-laws in Minnesota. I would love to catch Musky, which I know West Battle Lake holds, and of course Walleye. I have been trying to look for areas that hold smallmouth but was unable to find any. I don't have a boat up there or anything so I know I will be in a massive disadvantage for musky but I will give it a try with waders. I would love to get as many tips as possible! Cheers!
    • thelars5
      This years West Central Bowhunter 60 will be held on August 12th and 13th with registration from 9am - 3pm Saturday and 9am - 2pm Sunday!   Come to enjoy the rolling hills and grasslands of the Prairie Woods Environmental Learning Center. Little Crow Archers of Willmar & Swift County Archers of Benson have teamed up to host this 60-Target 3-D shoot. Shoot it in one day, or make a weekend of it and shoot both days! Our promise is that you will not be disappointed!   Highlights include, Generous sized walking trails, On-site concessions, and seating deck! Stakes for : Adult, Youth, Traditional, and Cubs All on over 100 Acres! 90% Rinehart Targets   Full Course (60-Targets) $23 Adults ~ $15 Youth 16 & under ~ $60 Family Max 1/2 Course (30-Targets) $14 Adults ~ $8 Youth 16 & under ~ $36 Family Max   Shoot Location: Prairie Woods Environmental Learning Center 12718 10th St NE Spicer, MN 56288 GPS coordinates: N 45° 14.716 W 95° 1.777 @1.5 Miles West of Hwy 71 on County Road 29   www.littlecrowarchers.com
    • osok
         Personally I do seem to catch quite a few overs, some days it can be a challenge to find keeper fish ( stupid problem to have, huh?). One thing I notice is that all the fish seem to be very thick through out the classes.   While I was tackling some honey-do's I noticed that the breeze was a bit stiff, I'm sure it was a challenge to maintain a line or consistent  speed.   Over all was it a good day for you?
    • ZachD
      Nope that's exactly what I wanted to hear thank you probably will go to look at gander in forest lake to see if they have anything good left