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hondavxr

Oct 29 Report

12 posts in this topic

Thanks to the other reports I ventured out and did pretty good. I haven't fish for months now.I fished from 12-6pm and all the fish came around sunset. I caught 8 walleye and saugers, and some sheepies. No white bass today. Marked baitfish, mostly shad and schools of shiners, they were everywhere. Vertical jigging was the key, pink jighead with a fathead or large crappie minnow. Deep didnt produce anything and shallow was the magic today. Biggest one was a 25" that was fat and filled with shad. I took home three for the fryer 19",17" and 15" saugeye. Fall bite is on and good luck on the river.

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One more thing I noticed about the walleyes when I was filleting them for the fryer. All the walleyes had eggs or sperm. confused.gifDo you guys think this warm weather and high water have confused the fishes?

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Honda, I'm pretty sure that is they way it's always been. I know the crappies I make into tacos have eggs and sperm sacs too. The eggs are developing now for next springs spawn. The energy required for egg production is pretty much why late fall fishing can be hard on fish populations, the females are more actively feeding this time of year getting the eggs built up for spring.

LB

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my buddy caught a 15" saugeye last week. interesting. what's the rule on those? 15" minimum or no size limit?

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I beleive it is considered a walleye, but if you check your regs book I think it says in there.

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I never gone real in depth on that issue but from what I get out of the fishing reg book is they are only concerned about the size of the walleyes. otherwise I am sure they would have listed sauger and saugeye specifically in the minimum requirements. Sauger and walleye are considered the same as far as possession! Just my opinion.

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If they have spots on the dorsal fin, call them saugers, if no spots call them saugeye/walleye.

If in doubt and under 15" throw back.

Good luck fihsing SteveOOO and all.

Turk

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I can usually tell that it is a sauger by the tell tale spots. Saugers body's are also more slender. I remember years ago reading that saugers and walleyes could not mate, and the only saugeyes were unnatural and sterile man-made species. But I think they probably evolve cuz on the Croix saugeyes are plentiful and there is some size to them. It reminds me a lot of the wipers( white bass and stipers) in other states. Good luck fishing yalls I mights be out there this weekend again.

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this had the black spots but also the tell-tale white tip on the tail

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Turk is right.Saugeye have no spots on their dorsal fin but look like a sauger for the most part.There is a fifteen inch minimum length for them.This time of year there should be no problem getting fifteens in saugers.Saugers do have some white on the tip of their tale,some more than others.Walleyes and crappie,at least on the Croix will start developing eggs in September in most years.If your in doubt about Sauger/Saugeye species make sure you measure.

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was fishing from shore tonight, north side of the bridge Minnesota side of prescott... I didn't catch any, but a group of 4, caught about 14 sauger/eyes... kept about 10. Minnows on a plain hook, with 2 split shot...casting NE from the corner of the public fishing area.

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had the similar golden color of a 'eye but had the spots. he was over 15 so we kept him for the HGR. interesting looking fish

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