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Ryan_V

water in oil question

7 posts in this topic

I recently sunk my atv. water in the air intake...in the crankcase etc. brought it to the dealer and they dried it out and I've changed the oil twice more since getting it back from them (4 oil changes total). My question is, if there is still moisture in the crankcase, will the oil be milky all the time, just when it's warm after running, or when cold....I have one more oil change left on the shelf, I plan on doing that one before ice fishing and call it good. when I check the oil after running it, I can't tell if the oil is just bubbly, or is actually cloudy.

thanks for your help.

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Depending on how deep you sunk it don't forget to clean out all the cables and locks. Mine went for a swim and I was pretty sure I had it all cleaned up until the first time it got really cold. Keep a bottle of lock deicer around for awhile.

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After driving it for over an hour check the oil, if it is going to turn milky it will, if it doesnt turn milky, then you got most of the water out, and with your plan of 1 more before winter is a good idea. Once the oil turns milky, it doesnt seperate quickly, it will pretty much stay milky.

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Considering the changing you have already done, you probably have only a small amount of residual moisture left: I would recommend running it for an extended time - a couple of hours - under light to modest load, do not ride hard. This should get it up to full operating temperature and boil out the residual amount of water you have left. Then come back and do your final oil change. After the long ride it should clear. (Any time you change oil in you always leave a portion of the old oil behind, maybe even 10%, that is hung in various small valleys in the engine.)

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I take it they dried out the air box under the seat too..?

That water oil mix will turn to chocolate moose in the crank. That gets stuck everywhere and above the oil level. So changing the oil gets a little of that out but not all of it.

I wouldn't be afraid to fill the crank with fuel oil. I mean fill it till it couldn't hold anymore. Don't run it. Then I'd tilt the rear end up till it was sitting on the brush guards and let it sit like that. Then lift the front end up and let it sit. After that I'd be sloshing the wheeler from side to side for as long as I could take it. Drain the fuel oil and the replace the filter and refill with oil and run it. Take the oil cap off when you run it so the moister can escape.

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as usual, thanks for the info fellas!!!

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well, ran her for over an hour today and got her good and hot...... dropped the oil, and it looked really good. dropped the filter, put a new filter on and dropped new oil in, should be good to go for winter!!! just have to put my new plow mount on!!

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