Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Kyle

Im gonna give it a try...

23 posts in this topic

Well I havent been out in the bow stand since 2nd weekend. IM headed up north tomorrow, and am gonna give a darn good try this weekend. First weekend I got scented by numerous deer that were close enough to shoot, but wouldnt take the step I needed to give me a good shot. Then I got smart and bought a pair of rubber boots. Second weekend, I didnt see anything, so I moved stands a little bit. I have never killed one with my bow, so I get pretty excited. Hopefully I can put one in where it needs to go. Anyone got any tips for staying calm? IM also wondering if/what time of the day to use my grunt call. I have been reading that people are seeing bucks chasing does a little bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until you shot your first, the nerves are going to be working in full force. Every deer you shoot it will be somewhat better. If I could suggest one thing, I would shoot even a doe if it offers a good shot. I know everyone wants Mr Big but if you wait until that deer strolls by and have never shot a deer with your bow, you might choke.

After many years of bow hunting, I still draw back on all deer that walk by me in range. I learn from this when I can draw so the deer does not see my movement and after that its almost always a killing shot.

You will need to learn when to draw back for sure or you will get caught by the deer. I always try to draw back when the deeris coming my way and its vision is blocked by a brush pile or a large tree. Drawing back on a deer when its in open view can be very diffucult. Another tip, if your hunting a field edge from a tree, make sure your in at least a few feet so the deer does not skyline you or it will be good bye. Also, try to have some tree limbs in the tree you are hunting right behind you to break up your outline.

There are many good archers on this forum and I'm sure others will chime in with more tips to help you get that first trophy.

Good luck and most of all, have fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

After many years of bow hunting, I still draw back on all deer that walk by me in range. I learn from this when I can draw so the deer does not see my movement and after that its almost always a killing shot.

You will need to learn when to draw back for sure or you will get caught by the deer.


There's are great tip, I never thought of that... thanks HL!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a really old bow, and the let off is almost non existant. So draw timeing is pretty significant for me being I just cannot hold it back for very long compared to shooting a newer bow. Next season I will be out there with a newer bow.

On a different note, would you recommend usuing and kind of deer scent, or is there a good time to use a grunt call?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love bow hunting! It is such a rush, but I just want to ge one under my belt so bad. HL- I plan on just shooting a doe. I dont want to take a fawn, but a yearling or a doe would be awesome! I feel like if I get one under my belt, I will be less nervous about everthing, and be more confident about what I am doing/can do out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since you cannot hold back on the bow to long, you will need to draw when the deer is looking elsewhere or get it to be interested in something else. A grunt call may get the deer to come in but I would not grunt when it is right by you or the deer will know where it came from and may spot you. A little scent on the ground may help getting the deer interested in it and give you the time you need to get drawn back.

The other thing you will need to do is maybe just sit and wait until the deer is looking in another direction and then draw.

It will work as usually a deer will come through walking and stop and look around and thats a good time to draw. If you are at full draw and the deer is still walking, what I will do is make a small low volume noise and a deer will almost always stop and look around and then you can whack it.

Just try and wait and it will work for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, I've shot lots of deer and the excitement never seems to go away for me. That's why I'm there.

The biggest thing I do to calm myself is visualize before the deer come as to where they may come from, where they may be, how far away, when I might be able draw, where to hold, etc. Sounds a bit Zen-like, but it works.

That first deer is a thrill of a lifetime. Savor it. Enjoy. Good luck! We're all rooting for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Donbo, great tips as I seem to always try and do the same thing. This is what makes this forum so great is all the archers on here that are willing to help out a fellow archer.

Thanks to all for the help and great tips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something that works for me is to try and decide as soon as possible if the deer you see is a deer you want to take. If so then I tell myself over and over to pick a "spot" on the deer and make a good shot. If it is a buck I "try" not to look at the headgear once I have decided to take him, not the easiest thing to do but it seems to help the nerves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With both deer i arrowed this year, they were in plain sight when i drew back, no branches or anything to cover, but i waited (like everyone else said) till they had their head down or were looking away. the big boy i harpooned on tuesday night was actually making a scrape about 8-9 yards from my stand when i drew back. also with your question about the grunt call, im no expert, but with the buck i shot tuesday night i grunted twice in fairly quick succession when he was in sight about 80 yards away, he looked towards me for awhile i waited awhile before i gave him and third grunt and he came right to me like he was on a string. i dont know if its good to be grunting away when your sitting in your stand if you cant see any deer? whats everyone elses thoughts on that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[i dont know if its good to be grunting away when your sitting in your stand if you cant see any deer? whats everyone elses thoughts on that?

With the rut in it's early stages now, I will blow on my grunt call every half hour or so. Usually 3 grunts about a second apart. It has worked for me often enough to know that it can be effective. Doesn't work all the time, but 2 - 3 times a year is pretty commmon. I'll often add a doe bleat from a can call. IMO this is the best call going from now through November.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i feel it doesn't hurt! i have had bucks come in looking around.( usually these are small bucks)so i feel that they heard the call and was looking for the deer that make it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well like i said, im no expert but i have been asking alot of questions of people that do know pretty good whats goin on, and they have said that part of the problem of rattling or grunting when you cant actually see the deer is that alot of the deer you arent seeing are seeing you before they get close enough. I guess if your just doing 3 quick grunts every half an hour thats probably not really a problem though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harvey-

Thanks for the great tips. This is why I like this forum so much too! Thanks to all for all your input as well. Keep it comeing, as a beginner I feel that I can never have to much advice!

Thanks H4L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alway happy to offer what I can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually try to draw when the deer is making that last step to be in the clear. If it stops behind something I don't begin my draw until it starts to move again. Very seldom have I been caught drawing while doing that & unless the openings small & the deer won't stop, you are going to get the shot at that point.

I would agree on deer in a field where they're wide open & they just have to get in range, you need to wait until they look the other way or drop their head, or something or they'll more times then not catch you. If they look your way once you've started to draw, just finish it & shoot them, it's your best chance. If you stop mid draw they'll probably lock on you until you start shaking anyway. If you're in position to draw, but haven't actually started, just freeze, they may give up on you or turn away & take a few steps before checking you again, you have to draw immediately then & shoot as soon as they stop.

I blind call quite a bit, depending on how much I'm going to hunt a stand, once mid October rolls around. I won't usually do it for the first 1 - 1 1/2 hours on stand, but after that I'll call every 30-45 minutes. If I've can called in a location before I may mostly do grunts the next time. If it's your last hunt in a spot before gun season I wouldn't be afraid to be pretty agressive unless you've got a deer patterned that you're pretty sure is coming at a certain time anyway, then I'd probably just be quiet unless it's getting late & you don't think they're coming. Have your bow in hand immediately after calling, especially with the can, as if they're close when you call they may come running in within seconds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturday I called about every 30 mins. Grunts mixed with doe bleats. I saw 4 does, but I am almost positive they werent there because of the calling. They were using a heavy 4 wheeler trail about 60yds to my right. So I got down at 10:30am and moved my stand. I didnt see anything the rest of the weekend. However, after I moved my stand, I decided to take a walk back to where my stand was(two moves ago) at the begining of the season. Got back there, and heard what sounded like two bucks fighting. Turned to look and there was a GIANT buck bounding away from me. What I thought was two bucks fighting was his massive antlers getting stuck in branches on his way out. That was the first big buck I have ever seen while doing any kind of deer hunting. It was awsome, and really made my weekend. I am done for the season with the bow. Now that rifle season is approaching, and ducks and geese will be heading down in november, I really wont have time to sit in the bow stand. It was a fun season, but next year I will have a new bow set up, and am going to try to pattern the deer a bit more. Thanks for any and all advice any of you have thrown my way this season. Who knows, maybe if I get a chance, I will hit it one more time in late november or december.

H4L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man you're hanging it up with the best two weeks of the bow season remaining. Bowhunting & waterfowl hunting do definitely conflict with each other. I've shot very few ducks since I got bowdicted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bigbucks, I completely agree with your statements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah what bigbucks said. Anyone can shoot a deer with a gun but nothing compares to a bow hunt kill. I like the fact that duck hunting has been poor the last few years in my area as I didn't have the urge to duck hunt as much. The best time of the year IMO for big bucks is right around the corner, if not here already. Man grab that bow and go after MR. BIG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know what ya mean fellas, but I will be in SD pheasant hunting this comeing weekend, and then next weekend is rifle opener. From what I have heard, once gun hunters get in the woods, it totally screws up bowhunting for everyone. If ya'll think its really worth going out after the rifle season, then I will definatley give it a go, especially if waterfowl from canada dont push down until mid november. What do ya think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you haven't tagged out at the end of November, give it another try. I have seen many nice bucks settle down when the shots fade. Most of the time, I have a .22 and am squirrel hunting, but still amazed at how the bucks will find food after the rut and feed before sun down, these can be some of the easiest to pattern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend that shoot 140+ class bucks every year with the bow. He shoots his doe early in the season, and then waits for the rut to tag the buck, he usually gets his buck opening weekend of gun season, he swears it is the best time to bowhunt, this will be my first year bowhunting the 3A gun season, I have always pheasant hunted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Walleyeslayer25
      Good luck out there.  I'll try to make some time to stop over. 
    • Neutz68
      Oh sure.... I remember ya..    Birchwood is a nice place too..  I am sure we will be seeing ya this weekend. We will be sitting on the docks during the afternoon so if you see us out swing on over. I have a green Lund Rebel with a 50 Merc...   
    • Tom Sawyer
      The reason I asked @eyeguy 54 is during the day that ramp parking lot at Cathedral is always full of student parking. Can't understand how they get away with it. During the week prior to Governor's Opener we never had any issues during the weekdays, but now on school days, we just launch at Wilson Park. BTW, did you find any walleye on the down current sides of the sandbars in that stretch?
    • Walleyeslayer25
      We use to go there until a few years ago. Now we are right next store. I couldn't figured out how to get into my old account so I had to make a new one. My old screen name was deershooter.  
    • Neutz68
      Yep that's us... Cabin #2 and #3...  You part of the other group we chat with up there??    
    • Walleyeslayer25
      Thanks for the reply.  Have had much time for research this year. Do you usually stay at pine tree cove? 
    • Rick
      People who enjoy the North Shore and Lake Superior and want to help shape its future are encouraged to consider volunteering to serve on the Governor’s Council on Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program.  This is a citizen advisory group that sets grant funding priorities, reviews grant applications and recommends projects to receive funding through the Coastal Program. All funded projects benefit Minnesota’s coastal area. The 15-member council is made up of three representatives each for Carlton, Cook, Lake and St Louis counties and three at-large positions that can be filled statewide. There are ten available seats on the council. The council meets about five times per year at various North Shore locations. Council members receive travel reimbursement and serve 60 to 70 hours per year while fulfilling a two or three year term. All adult Minnesotans are eligible to serve. Anyone interested can apply online at the Minnesota Secretary of State website or download a paper application. For more information about the Coastal Program’s work and service area, see the program webpage. Questions about the Coastal Program and application process can be directed to Amber Westerbur, Coastal Program manager, at 218-834-1445 or amber.westerbur@state.mn.us. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Department of Natural Resources will offer three northern Minnesota parcels in a public oral bid auction in June.  Two parcels in St. Louis County and one parcel in Beltrami County will be auctioned on Monday, June 26 at the DNR Office in Grand Rapids.  The properties include a developable lakeshore parcel on St. Mary’s Lake and a recreational parcel in the Kabetogama area, both in St. Louis County, and a 40-acre unimproved parcel in Lammers Township, Beltrami County. The area DNR Office is located at 1201 E. Highway 2, Grand Rapids, Minnesota, 55744. Registration will begin at noon, with auction at 1 p.m. Bidders are advised to obtain/view the property data sheet, be familiar with the property, minimum bid price, and terms and conditions of sale prior to attending the auction. Bidders must be registered before the 1 p.m. start time in order to bid. To obtain a property data sheet or terms and conditions of sale, call 651-259-5432, 888-646-6367 or email landsale@dnr.state.mn.us. The property data sheets are also available online at www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/landsale/. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      There are plenty of fun places to go and things to do this Memorial Day weekend at Minnesota state parks and trails.  Here are some last-minute travel-planning tips: Camping. Sites are still available. Reservations are now required for all overnight stays at Minnesota state parks and recreation areas, and many sites are already booked, but here are some options: — Check www.mndnr.gov/reservations more than once. There are often cancellations, and the inventory of available sites changes all the time. –Take advantage of the long weekend to explore Minnesota’s northwest territory. Sites are easier to come by at the state parks and recreation areas in that part of Minnesota, and there are plenty of reasons why it’s worth the drive: — Zippel Bay State Park is located on south shore of vast Lake of the Woods, with a white sand beach. — Lake Bronson State Park has an observation tower that people can climb for a bird’s-eye view of the woods and wildlife below. — Plan a route to include visits to other state parks along the way, such as a stop to see the Headwaters of the Mississippi River at Itasca State Park. — Pitch a tent at a state forest, where no reservations are needed (or taken). Campsites at state forest campgrounds are all first-come, first-served. Naturalist-led programs. There are more than 100 programs taking place at state parks and trails over Memorial Day Weekend. For example:
      — Guided tours will take place throughout the weekend (and continue daily through Labor Day) at Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park in southeastern Minnesota and at Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park near Ely in the northeast. Because the cave and mine tours are underground, it won’t matter if it rains. Reservations recommended; visit www.mndnr.gov/reservations for more information, including times and prices. —   Free guided tours over, under and through the fascinating rock formations known as glacial potholes will be offered Saturday, Sunday and Monday from noon to 1 p.m. at Interstate State Park. No reservations required. —  Plus, live reptiles, voyageur canoe rides, star programs, and more. For complete listings, check the online calendar. Discovery hikes. Look for deer, birds and wildflowers along one of the many scenic trails at Minnesota state parks and recreation areas. Pick up a Hiking Club kit ($14.95 at park offices), look for “secret passwords” on signs along specially marked trails and earn rewards. Two-wheel tours. Bike one of Minnesota’s many paved state trails. They’re free and mostly flat, because many of them are former railroad routes, and many of them now have trailside tune-up stations, if there is a need to tighten brakes or pump up tires. Find a trailhead at www.mndnr.gov/biking. Paddling. There are 35 state water trails, the newest of which is the 20-mile Shell Rock River. Many of the campsites along Minnesota’s rivers are first-come, first-served and free. See bison. See one herd at Blue Mounds State Park in southwestern Minnesota (and attend a program at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, May 27, about how the park’s bison herd links directly to the millions of bison that once roamed North America). Or drive through the bison range and see the other herd at Minneopa State Park in Mankato. Fishing. Minnesota residents don’t need a license and can fish for free at most state parks. Many park offices also loan out free fishing equipment for visitors to use. Or for people who have a license, they can wet a line at more than 1,600 fishing piers throughout the state. To find a nearby fishing pier, search by lake or county in the A-Z list at www.mndnr.gov/fishing_piers. Geocaching. Try this high-tech treasure hunt. Many parks loan out GPS units and offer programs to get started, such as the Intro to Geocaching program from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday, May 29, at Wild River State Park. For information, contact the DNR Information Center at info.dnr@state.mn.us or 888-646-6367 (8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday). Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Guided public tours of Soudan Underground Mine, the state’s first iron ore mine, will resume for the 2017 season on Memorial Day weekend. Tours will be offered from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, May 27 through Sept. 30, and on weekends only until Oct. 22 at Lake Vermillion – Soudan Underground Mine State Park near Tower.   Underground mine tours take visitors a half-mile down into the mine shaft in a hoisted “cage” and then for a three-quarter-mile train ride into the last and deepest area mined. Mine interpreters share information about the unique, high-quality iron formation and its contribution to the industrialization of the United States and the generations of people who worked in the mine from 1884 to 1962. “About 32,000 people take the underground mine tour each year, and it’s an experience you won’t find anywhere else in Minnesota,” said mine interpreter James Pointer. Guided tours are $12 for adults and $7 for children age 5-12. There is no cost for children under age 5. Hard hats are required and provided for underground tours, and visitors are encouraged to check the park Web page for suggestions about recommended footwear and clothing (it can be chillier than expected in the mine, because the temperature is 51 degrees Fahrenheit year-round). Visitors also can take a free, self-guided tour of the historic mining buildings that are above ground. For information about tours and reservations, visit www.mndnr.gov, email the DNR Information Center at info.dnr@state.mn.us or call 888-646-6367 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.