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Ron Burgundy

Mineral blocks

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Ron Burgundy    0
Ron Burgundy

Is it too late to put a block or rock out where I hunt second firearms season?

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PerchJerker    0
PerchJerker

If it is primarily salt it will always attract deer all year long. If it is primarily minerals it won't have much attraction on it's own. The deer need the minerals more in the spring than at this time of year but they are always good - the best way to think of minerals for deer is to think of them as vitamins for people.

Salt and minerals in block or rock form are the least appealing to deer. Granular form is more appealing because it's easier for them to eat. I've never used it but I've heard that water softener salt works well, and is obviousely cheap and easy to find.

Don't expect miracles or tons of activity from putting out a salt / mineral lick.

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

I use loose mineral and blocks.

The block leeches into the soil nice and slowly.

I'll top off the blocks with more loose mineral as the summer goes. I use a 50 lb block and it lasts all summer, into the winter.

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tealitup    1
tealitup

Place the salt block on a stump and it will seep into the wood. You will see it get destroyed next spring

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

I dont want to cut trees down to do that... crazy.gif

I had a stump where one of my current mineral sites are. As you stated, its gonzo. Now its a hole in the ground.

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ChuckN    0
ChuckN

I placed a block on a stump 4 years ago and the deer still hit the area. Stump is still there, but the ground is destroyed around it. I finally added another block a few days ago. Deer love this stuff.

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TrophyEyes    0
TrophyEyes

Just to double check. Is it illegal to hunt over a mineral block? and not a salt lick? I thought it was if it had nutritional value it was illegal.

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UdeLakeTom    0
UdeLakeTom

It is okay as long as there isn't any grain in it.

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BRULEDRIFTER    15
BRULEDRIFTER

This is copied from the 2007 MN hunting Regs: EVERYONE SHOULD TRY READING THESE!!!

Liquid scents, salt, and minerals are not considered bait, unless they

contain other foods defined below as bait.

• “Bait” is grain, fruit, vegetables, nuts, hay, or other food that is capable

of attracting or enticing deer and that has been transported and placed

by a person.

• This restriction does not apply to foods resulting from normal

or accepted farming, forest management, wildlife food plantings, orchard management, or similar land management activities.

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B. Amish    0
B. Amish

crickfamjune2002wa8.jpg

this picture is from a couple years back, but the stump has had salt on it for around 15 years. it is an old bur oak though and there are not a whole lot of deer that use it.

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Ron Burgundy    0
Ron Burgundy

I got 2 gallons of deer caine at the new Fleet Farm in Roch. It's going into the ground this weekend. I'll add to it in two months. Does anybody else use this? What are your thoughts or experiences?

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xedge2002    0
xedge2002

I've tried it several times with no luck at all. Use BLB's mineral mix on here, it is WAY cheaper and in my experience you get a lot better results with it!

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Scott K    28
Scott K

BLB, I emailed you about questions on this mineral mix, I just want to know whats all in it, and prices, basically, and how well the deer like it.

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

Here it is for all to see. And yes, it works very well.

WHITETAIL DEER HOMEMADE MINERAL MIX RECIPE

Ingredients: Makes 200 lbs. for about $23.00

1 part Di-calcium phosphate, this is a dairy feed additive bought at feed stores.

Comes in 50lb Bags at around $11.00 you need one bag.

2 parts Trace mineral salt, the red and loos kind without the medications.

Comes in 50lb Bags at around $5.00 you need two bags.

1 part Stock salt, ice cream salt.

Comes in 50lb Bags at around $2.00 you need one bag.

Directions:

-Use a 3 pound or similar size coffee can to use as your measure for each part of the mix.

-Mix all together well but not until read to use, keep ingredients separate until ready to put to use.

-Dig or tear up a circle in the soil about 36 inches wide and about 6 inches deep.

-Mix your mineral mixture with the soil.

Maintenance:

-Replenish in 6 months with fresh supply of mineral, and then each year there after.

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

PS - I emailed the recipe to a CO and asked if there is ANY concern about the Di-Cal part specifically as being considered "bait".

He said its minerals, so its fine.

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Scott K    28
Scott K

Thanks blb, so this isnt something I need to get directly from you, I can get this at a local feed store correct? Not that I dont want to give you my bussiness! I would, if I could!

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

HA!

No, just go to Fleet Farm or any grain elevator/feedstore.

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reddog    0
reddog

I'm sure you have a reason, but why wait to mix it all together till you are ready to place it. What happens if you pre mix it and dont get it out?

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

No idea. Its what I found on the internet. So I just do it that way.

Maybe the Di cal breaks down in the salt or something. No idea at all.

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mnhunter2    0
mnhunter2

Only visit the old deer stand during the deer season, mostly because of the 9 hr drive, so I just add an unopened bag of trace mineral salt to the excisting big hole the deer have made since last years salt was added and it been working fine for the last 15yrs.

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