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Lumenocks vs. Tracers

10 posts in this topic

Has anyone used either of these? Do you like them? And what makes one better than the other?

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I have used and still use the Luminocks. Its easy to follow your shot and see where you hit. Also alot easier to find your shot arrow. I have three arrows in my quiver with these. I would buy them again.

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I second HL's comments. Lumenoks are a great tool. They have helped me find arrows quickly a number of times. They really give you a good sense of where exactly your hit was too, especially in low light situations. I always have at least one in my quiver.

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I've used Lumenocks & liked them, but I couldn't get the thing to stay on consistently. I shot it through a deer & the light went out so I couldn't see the arrow from the stand, which was stuck in the ground almost vertical right where the deer had been standing. I may try another one or two, maybe I just got a faulty one.

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This may help to keep them on. when I first started to use them I had a real problem with turning them on and off. What I now do is, just turn the nock to turn it off a small amount. I was trying to pull it out and I did, to far and then it would not go on.

Very small twist with your fingers and then I have had great luck with them.

Hope this helps.

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Has anyone tried to make your own lighted nocks?

There is a video on a video hosting site, search for "homemade lighted nock".

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I lost a deer a few years ago on a 30 yd. broadside shot and have been shooting the lumenocks ever since. The shot looked great from what I remember seeing, right behind the shoulder. It was a complete pass-thru with OK blood for 150 yards. Then it started to peter out and I followed deer tracks for another 100 with a droplet every 30 yards. Never found that deer. I think I hit it slightly high, and my mind convinced me that the arrow went where I wanted it to, not where it actually went.

Ever since, I haven't had that problem. Watching your point of impact is ultra-easy, and can tell you alot about your next move and how soon you want to trail that deer. You'll see if you make a bad hit, and it'll be burned into your memory with how bright that nock is, especially in early morning or later evening. It could be the difference between pushing a deer with a mediocre shot vs. getting him the next morning dead where he first bedded.

If you film, it's a must IMO. Great for turkeys too, as shot placement is even more critical.

My only complaint thus far is that I've been getting some inconsistent funky arrow flights. I haven't narrowed down whether or not it's a problem with some other component, or my arrow weights and FOC are screwy from the heavy nock. It's hit or miss, but just make sure to practice with them to make sure everything is good.

Joel

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I've only tried the Lumenocks this year and love them, however only been shootin at the 3-D in low light. Still waiting for Mr. Big. Definitely nice to see the arrow's path and enter point and seem to have no effect on my accuracy.

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any of you guys have a problem with the Lumenoks cracking the backs of carbon arrows? seems like the lumenoks are doing that on a couple of my arrows....

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Next chance I get, I'm going to try the homemade ones. Should be able to make them for $3-4.

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