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lawman

Another Yellow Bird Question

3 posts in this topic

The directions on the board tell you to put a "large bead" on the line 3 feet above the lure to keep the board away from the lure when fighting a fish. that snap is pretty big....what do you all use to keep the board off the lure?

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A rubber core sinker works good - this was called out in the directions for my 10 year old yellow birds. For musky size lures you might need to up size to the "big birds" If you do get the big size birds the black pincher type releases that come with them will probably drive you nuts, by popping off the line. I would recomend adding the orange osprey releases.

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Quote:

The directions on the board tell you to put a "large bead" on the line 3 feet above the lure to keep the board away from the lure when fighting a fish. that snap is pretty big....what do you all use to keep the board off the lure


Most guys run Offshore and Church boards, and don't want the board to pop off the line or slide down to the fish. Run your bait back however far you want it, clip the line to the board, run the board out there until you get a fish, reel in the board and unclip it, then reel in the fish. I'm not very familiar with YB boards but maybe you can rig them this way????

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