Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Enginejet

Trolling speeds

9 posts in this topic

I bought my first boat late in the season last year and this year have been getting out more. We haven't had much luck trolling and I was wondering if anyone can offer some advise on what speed is best for trolling? Is there a different speed for Walleye than Northern for example?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually a little slower for the eyes. Around 1mph for eyes. For northerns I will go anywhere from 1.5 to 3 or 4mph.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I troll at all different speeds, as low as 1, and upto 4-5 for walleyes, pike 3-5 , if they are agressive they will nail it, change speeds and see what they like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As was just mentioned,try various speeds. My own rule of thumb as a place to begin for eyes is less than 2 mph in the cold water in spring, then 2 to 3 mph or even faster as the water warms and in the fall.

smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next time you are out trolling try varying the speed of your lure with your arm instead of a constant speed with your boat. I have had good luck trolling around 1.2 - 1.8 and using your arm to rip the lure forward and then pause lure by moving rod backwards. Most times, the pause will cause the strike if fish has been following. This way even if your boat is going at constant speed you can make your lure go as fast or slow as you want. This method can be extremely good trolling edges of weedlines or coming over weedy points hitting both inside and outside turns of the point. And, maybe try a little more experimenting with colors and lure sizes. What works one day which may be bright and sunny may not be the best option if next day is cloudy and windy. Good luck and hope this helps as it is real exciting to feel the strike when fish hit trolling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do most of my trolling at 2.5-3.5 mph. The water is getting warmer now so I wouldn't say 4.5 mph is to fast.

The main thing is how fast can the lure your using be trolled? Spoons can't be trolled over 2 mph without twisting up your line. Some crank baits can not be trolled over 2 mph.

From opener right up to ice, 2.5 - 3.5 mph is as good a starting point as any if your using crankbaits. Never get stuck at one speed. Do "S" turns and see if there hitting on the rod on the outside of the turn or the inside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the tips, we're going out Sat and I'll give them a try

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other way to tell if you are going to fast or to slow is if, your trolling at 2.5 and the fish inhails the lure, go alittle faster. If you are just barely hooked at the edge of the lip, go a little slower.

When you are trolling and you tend to pick up more strikes on corners then straight aways, if its the inside corner pole hitting more go slower, if its the outer pole hitting more go faster.

If they arent hitting at all, have a couple beers and enjoy the outdoors grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Live bait vs. cranks....cranks 2.5 to 4 for me....live, much slower-less than 2...constant s turns will changes the spead of your presentation if your holding your tip directly out to the side of either side of the boat.....pointing out common sense, "driver side" or left side on a boat, and turning right...you get a hit, you may want to speed up a bit....ect.

Live bait lindys/little joes...that type of stuff, not my bag really so I will leave to more expierienced....but when you hear the 1.8ish stuff, seems to apply here rather than cranks.

Bottom line, change speeds is good to make a determination on what is working that time of year, that day.....simply never consitant, but a great place to start in my opinion.

jk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Neighbor_guy
      I found some ice!!! Not exactly much, and there are swans in the picture indecating open water too. But it's a start. 
    • ZachD
      The wind isn't going to help though
    • papadarv
      I live north of the metro in East Bethel so not to familiar with south metro lakes. Minnetonka, Prior, Medicine, seem to have some popularity. On the north side the Chisago City area Green, Chisago, Lindstrom, Center, and Comfort are usually productive for pan fish, northern, walleye and summer bass. Big Marine also holds some nice crappie to 14" and larger Sunfish. Forest Lake and a bit west Coon lake also holds a variety. Last year I did a fairly extensive look at DNR lake surveys within a 3 hour drive north of the metro and came up with this list that looked promising for Walleye. I have fished a few during summer, but not all, with fair success.  Here is the list. This is typically what you will find on the DNR Lake Finder site only their survey will be for all species. I just took the walleye info. The Navionics link BringAnExtension listed should give you great contours for any of the lakes your interested in.
    • Jim Uran
      Well that fell apart quickly lol, Looks like starting tuesday we won't see above freezing for a while, I saw lows in the single digits and even a - sign! 
    • mrklean
      I have a 949i hub and love it very warm and holds heat really well