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fisherman-andy

South Metro eyes

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fisherman-andy

Did a bit of fishing today at a South Metro body of water and caught over 30 eyes in 2 hours. shocked.gif

But to my demise they were small, maybe yearlings or a little older. grin.gif Nevertheless it was still fun and was hoping that I land a large one but it never happen as I couldn't locate any larger fish. Will have to go back and try again to see if I can find where the big ones are hiding at.

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FishingRebel

Quote:

Did a bit of fishing today at a South Metro body of water and caught over 30 eyes in 2 hours.
shocked.gif

But to my demise they were small, maybe yearlings or a little older.
grin.gif
Nevertheless it was still fun and was hoping that I land a large one but it never happen as I couldn't locate any larger fish. Will have to go back and try again to see if I can find where the big ones are hiding at.


30 eyes in 2 hours on a Metro lake? Are you sure they weren't perches?

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fisherman-andy

Positive. Mostly 7-9 inchers. There is no Perches in this body of water. I am sure there are some bigger eyes to be caught. I just need time to figure out the feeding patterns and holding areas. This place probably isn't more than 20 to 30 minutes from the St. Paul/Mpls by drive. If them eyes hold up well this place will be an awesome honey hole in the next 2 to 3yrs. grin.gif

5-15-07 update:

I managed to catch 2 slightly larger eyes about 12 to 13 inches and lots of small ones again. Total eyes caught 26.

While fishing around I saw the CO drive by but never was able to catch him. He just checked around and drove off before I could talk to him. Anyhow im sure there are larger ones now. Just gotta find them.

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South_Metro_Slayer

sounds like a rearing pond andy

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Brad0383

So where is this secret fishing hole? I haved been fishing for 2 years around hte south metro and have not yet managed to get one eye....I am getting very frustrated.

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fisherman-andy

Quote:

sounds like a rearing pond andy


Nope. I know of many rearing ponds and this one ain't a pond by any means.(Hint)

Brad, what time of day do you fish? You may want to try to fish later in the day right into dusk when them eyes are more aggressive in them South Metro lakes. Especially if targeting a lake with only a fair amount of population can be difficult during the daylight. Targeting a smaller lake may also increase your chance too. Fish shallow waters and sand bars with drop offs. A Husky Jerk will usually do the trick.

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Carp-fisher

Quote:

Did a bit of fishing today at a South Metro body of water and caught over 30 eyes in 2 hours.
shocked.gif

But to my demise they were small, maybe yearlings or a little older.
grin.gif
Nevertheless it was still fun and was hoping that I land a large one but it never happen as I couldn't locate any larger fish. Will have to go back and try again to see if I can find where the big ones are hiding at.


I know exactly what body of water you are talking about. I did abit of research on it, and all of the fish were removed a few years back and restocked...so there are no larger walleyes in it. And sure enough, I had your experience when I tried ice fishing it this winter. Please don't ever post its name on this forum. Somebody did that to Holy Name lake two winters ago and it got pounded with the force of a carnival on ice...

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fisherman-andy

Yeap im pretty sure you know Carp Fisher and I ain't about to tell a soul to anyone about it. Upon further investigation myself your info about that body of water is correct.

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FishingRebel

Okays, thanks for the hints, I will do some investigating grin.gif A lake that had it's walleyes removed and was re-stocked with walleyes a few years ago... It is located in South Metro area... I dont think it would be too hard to find if I talk to the DNR.. cool.gif The lake is also Not more than 20 to 30 minutes away from Minneapolis/Saint Paul... Im sure if these hints are correct, locating the body of water will be EASY laugh.gif

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Black_Bay

If all the fish were removed by the DNR it was at least used as a rearing pond.

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Carp-fisher

I don't want to come off as being hard nosed or anything...I love fishing as much as the next guy. But I do think that bodies of water such as this ought to be left alone for awhile. While most of us are ethically minded sportsmen/women there are certain people that will go and fill their buckets with 6 to 9 inch walleyes when given the opportunity. I think this is a shame.

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fisherman-andy

Quote:

If all the fish were removed by the DNR it was at least used as a rearing pond.


Not this one as far as I know. I've fished many rearing ponds and this aint one. I think I have unveiled already too much info. Those smart enough will find what im talking about we can only wait to see what kind of honey hole this turns out to be in the next few years. Those who don't keep guessing cause it's gonna take forever for you to find it. Please be a goodsportsman and practice C&R if you do ever come upon this body of water. tongue.gif

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Carp-fisher

Hey Fisherman Andy, how does it generally go for fishing in rearing ponds? My manager at work has a walleye rearing pond in his backyard, and I've often wondered if it would be worth casting a line into.

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fisherman-andy

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Hey Fisherman Andy, how does it generally go for fishing in rearing ponds? My manager at work has a walleye rearing pond in his backyard, and I've often wondered if it would be worth casting a line into.


My experience with Walleye rearing ponds have been satisfactory. Most fish caught are 8 to 12 inches and seldom will I catch a larger eye 15inch+. Alot times them small eyes won't make it through the summer & winter due to poor water quality & low oxygen levels. This is why you find low abundance of fish in the rearing ponds. In fact you can fish a rearing pond and not catch a single eye at all and would be stumped to reason why? The DNR must rear it year after year to sustain a fish population. I find that ponds that have been reared only once or twice by the DNR hold little or no gamefish at all over the count of years. It's likely to die off naturally or get reclaimed and this happens without any fishing pressure.

I rather spend time on a body of water that is stocked with fingerlings or yearlings then fish a rearing pond. I will say this. I have monitored several rearing ponds in the last 3-5 yrs and never managed to catch more than a dozen eyes out of each of them through out the whole year. The fish range from 12 to 24inches and I have caught them as big as 28. What is weird is I don't seem to be catching small eyes, fingerlings or yearlings at all. Only larger ones on the rearing ponds. One would think vice versa. Don't forget also that I spend alot of hours on these ponds just to figure out the feeding patterns. So patience will reward. I've been to many rearing ponds where I have not caught a single walleye at all. Rearing doesn't equal an abundance of fish as most are taken for stocking into other lakes & ponds.

So say to the least it doesn't hurt to try. You never know what may surprise you. The best lure would have to be hand's down a small husky jerk that is crappie minnow colored. I also find that the fall season is best. So my ending advice to you would be if the pond is reared frequently year after year your likely to catch fish if it isn't reclaimed. But if it was reared only once or twice in the last 5 years you may have a tough time catching anything but potatoe chips but large eyes may be present again if it hasn't been reclaimed by the DNR.

Anyhow, today I have just added a brand new Minnkota Endura trolling motor to my canoe & raft setups. 30lb thrust! Yippie. More time fishing and less time paddling.

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Carp-fisher

Well sounds fun Andy. Have you ever tried float tubing? I hit small bodies of water with a float tube and it works pretty well.

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fisherman-andy

I've thought about float tubing several times. But since I already have a Canoe, a raft, & boat I much prefer that. I will fish areas that could be difficult to navigate with a float tube. Depends on the type of fish im targeting. I could be fishing in shallow 2-4 ft which makes tubing out of the question but not canoeing.

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MarchelRipley1

Buzzsaw put me on those walleyes last fall! Your secret is safe with us. smirk.gif

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hunting4walleyes

My question is, why does a guy come on here and say I caught 30 walleyes in two hours. Is it a bragging thing? I am by no means asking you to reveal your lake, but a time of day, pattern, equipment would be nice. It would be nice to see FM turn back to fishing info rather than a bragging board. I like the pictures, don't get me wrong. I just hate seeing post after post of people saying I caught 50 crappies, haha, good luck finding the lake.

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fisherman-andy

Quote:

My question is, why does a guy come on here and say I caught 30 walleyes in two hours. Is it a bragging thing? I am by no means asking you to reveal your lake, but a time of day, pattern, equipment would be nice. It would be nice to see FM turn back to fishing info rather than a bragging board. I like the pictures, don't get me wrong. I just hate seeing post after post of people saying I caught 50 crappies, haha, good luck finding the lake.


That's hardly bragging. As you see the reason I posted was I was stump to as why them eyes were so small. By doing so it feed my curiosity and I was able to get good feedback and info by other Anglers on here who knew of this same body of water that I had fished and had the same or similiar experience that I had. This place needs time for them eyes to grow and is like Carp Fisher said better left alone for the time being as I have not fished it since.

FYI, had these fish been bigger or catchable sized eyes I don't think you'll find me posting about it here at all.

But since you want to know what equipment I used, sure i'll be glad to tell you. 6ft rod light fast action, shimano reel, fireline 4lbs, jighead with various crappie plastics & various Husky jerk colors. No special electronic needed, no boat. All shore fishing! Them small eyes were aggressive all times of the day... GOOD FISHING!

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vikingmeatwad

Quote:

My question is, why does a guy come on here and say I caught 30 walleyes in two hours. Is it a bragging thing? I am by no means asking you to reveal your lake, but a time of day, pattern, equipment would be nice. It would be nice to see FM turn back to fishing info rather than a bragging board. I like the pictures, don't get me wrong. I just hate seeing post after post of people saying I caught 50 crappies, haha, good luck finding the lake.


I agree, I keep reading posts like this and they do absolutely nothing for anyone but the person posting.

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fisherman-andy

Quote:

Quote:

My question is, why does a guy come on here and say I caught 30 walleyes in two hours. Is it a bragging thing? I am by no means asking you to reveal your lake, but a time of day, pattern, equipment would be nice. It would be nice to see FM turn back to fishing info rather than a bragging board. I like the pictures, don't get me wrong. I just hate seeing post after post of people saying I caught 50 crappies, haha, good luck finding the lake.


I agree, I keep reading posts like this and they do absolutely nothing for anyone but the person posting.


Let me warn the next person who decides to troll on my threads and posts. I don't go trashing your post and threads or put them down. I expect you to do the same to mines. There are plenty of threads like mine here everyday on FM. There is nothing wrong with it.

If you got nothing good to add to this thread then dont. I can only take so so much criticism. Good day and good fishing...

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hunting4walleyes

Andy,

Please don't feel like I am trashing your thread. I am not the one calling people trolls! I just wanted to point out this website is all about fishing information. This site would never survive if it does not offer any fishing information.Most people will mention conditions, equipment used, FOW and so on. It helps every become better fishermen and women. More and more people and not willing to give any info and just post numbers. I am sorry if you feel this is criticism. I am not singling you out. There are many people on here that do the same. Just my .02

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fisherman-andy

Quote:

Andy,

Please don't feel like I am trashing your thread. I am not the one calling people trolls! I just wanted to point out this website is all about fishing information. This site would never survive if it does not offer any fishing information.Most people will mention conditions, equipment used, FOW and so on. It helps every become better fishermen and women. More and more people and not willing to give any info and just post numbers. I am sorry if you feel this is criticism. I am not singling you out. There are many people on here that do the same. Just my .02


That's where your wrong. It's also not wrong for making such a post. And if you had wanted to know the presentation used all you had to do was ask. These threads have the potential to be informative as well as sharing a good story.

Me calling people trolls is simply what it is. I don't like saying so but I also don't like others coming in here to criticize for no apparent reason at all. As this does no good to the thread or FM forums. Plus you are mis-interpreting this thread. You should re-read it over to see what its really about. Had I been landing larger eyes this post would've been very different. But these are tiny eyes were talking about... confused.gif

I don't have hard feeling towards anyone. I know people are just trying to be on the informative side. But sometimes just let it be. No need to put it down. Let's just put all this to rest.

Anyhow adding to this thread, a few days ago I was down at good old King Mill d a m. The water was low enought to wade around. Some rough fish. Caught a Pike. I did catch some eyes but only 2 that was 14" the rest were smaller in 2-4ft water. The usual tackle, jigheads & plastics. Fathead minnows. The weather was gloomy and had occasional rain showers. Them eyes again became especially active towards dusk.

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hunting4walleyes

Sorry Andy,

Not sure what else to say. I guess you can not take a apology very well. confused.gif I am sorry to be a "troll" to you. I am out on this one. It seems like nothing said will change how you feel. The weekend is hear and I am getting off this computer and hopping into the boat. Good fishing everyone!

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fisherman-andy

Quote:

Sorry Andy,

Not sure what else to say. I guess you can not take a apology very well.
confused.gif
I am sorry to be a "troll" to you. I am out on this one. It seems like nothing said will change how you feel. The weekend is hear and I am getting off this computer and hopping into the boat. Good fishing everyone!


I take your apology very well. But you don't seem to be understanding what I am saying here. That's ok. Let's spent less time arguing and more time fishing. Get out there. The fish are hungry...

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