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Milkdud

Red Lake Band to start commercial fishing???

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Milkdud

Here we go again the start of another walleye depleted lake! Are they going to have any regulations or limits on what they can take? I heard they can't use nets but I bet they do anyway!

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fisherdog19

Why do you assume that "they" will break their own laws immediately. Do you really think it will just be a free frawl with no regs or limit's? Maybe "you" should be a little more forgiving and give those allowed to commercially harvest, the benefit of doubt before judging what "you" think will be done. A little pre-emptive judging is not a good thing. At least try to be a little more politically correct in your posting.

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Gemstone

New article in Bemiji paper comfirms their intention to commercial fish starting this summer!!

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2dog

This is the article that was in todays Grand Forks Herald.

The Red Lake Band of Chippewa plans to begin commercial fishing for walleye this summer. The fish will not be netted.

"At this point, the band has no intention of doing anything in 2007 other than hook-and-line" fishing, Red Lake Department of Natural Resources Administrator Dave Conner said.

Under the plan, band members will be able to bring walleye they catch to the fish processing plant in Redby, Minn. The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community announced Monday that it has awarded a $1 million economic development grant to the Red Lake Band to help renovate the plant.

"We appreciate that the Red Lake Tribal Council wants to make life better for its members," SMSC Chairman Stanley Crooks said. "It is very important to us to help other Indian people help themselves. It is an important step for tribal sovereignty for Red Lake to reopen their fishery and provide jobs and resources for their members."

The Red Lake Band hasn't ruled out resuming netting at some time, but only once there is adequate enforcement to ensure the protection of the walleye population, Conner said.

At 289,000 acres, Red Lake is the largest lake entirely within Minnesota. The Red Lake Band controls 241,000 acres of the two-basin lake, the state the rest. The shallow, sand-and-gravel-bottomed lake is perfect walleye spawning habitat. It supports food for walleye and warms rapidly for good reproduction. Constant wave action keeps it well oxygenated, even in warm summer months.

But overfishing by Ojibwe netters and illegal sport angling all but wiped out the lake's walleyes by 1995. To help the walleye populations recover, the state and tribe banned taking any walleye from the lake and stocked millions of fish.

In 1999, the band, the state and the Bureau of Indian Affairs signed a 10-year agreement to help guide recovery efforts. Also involved in the recovery efforts are the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the University of Minnesota and the Red Lake Fisheries Association.

Fishing for Red Lake walleye resumed last year under a sustainable management plan with a 2006 quota of 414,000 pounds of walleyes. Band members, who could keep 10 walleyes a day, took about 14,000 pounds of walleyes.

The walleye quota for this year is 824,000 pounds. Band members took 53,000 pounds during the winter season. Conner said the tribe may increase the walleye limit for band members who supply the processing plant.

"The fishery provided a source of income for almost 100 years," Conner said. "A lot of members are excited about the opportunity to gain a little income."

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riverrat56

Good for them.

The lake is an important resource for the tribe, although they, ( and we ) messed it up once, no one wants to see it go back to the crash that happened in the early 90's, well except crappie fishermen.

As long as the nets stay out the band will still probally take less poundage than sportfishermen, if they do put the nets back in, the lake will still be ok with some managment.

Resorts rely on people to make a living, the Red Lake Band uses the fish in the lake to sell to make a living. Either way fish are being harvested.

The tribe is finally able to use a resource that they helped to restore, it is perfectly fine in my mind.

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Mike L

exactly. And anybody who thinks commercial fishing is a gravy job is kidding themselves.

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kelly-p

Why so negative Milkdud? They are entitled to 82% of the walleyes, we can take 18%. That is a hard cold fact that we need to live with. Last year we took twice as many walleyes as them off from our 18% of the lake.

The rules and regulations they have been reported and posted many times. If you do not know what their regulations are you must not have followed this story very closely. They have far stiffer penelties than we have. They have a hard quota now, 824,000 pounds a year is far better then the 3.2 million a year that were leaving the lake before.

NO gillnets. We should be happy.

They are trying to do something for their economy and still protect the lake. They are trying something completely new for them. Maybe we should be encouraging them and giving them a pat on the back rather then throwing rocks.

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Random guy

We live in a glass house on the non-reservation side. Before the stones are thrown sit back and just think we hit some pretty high numbers of walleye this past season. These are the fish that the creel survey gal took information on. How many limits went off the lake without going through the survey legally? How many walleye left the lake hidden in fishouses, coolers and who knows where? How many met the frying pan on the lake? How many large pike where harvested to be mounted but never made it to the taxidermist? How many walleye died from hooking mortality? How many 1lb propane tanks does it take to contaminate a lake?

The Red Lake Nation suffered the same fate Waskish and the surrounding area did, only difference in my opinion is they remember the past better then we do. To be honest I am much more concerned with the taking of illegal fish and pollution other than what the closely controlled and regulated Red Lake Nation fishery does.

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harvey lee

There is Iam sure enough blame to go around. With a little luck both sides can watch what they do and just maybe we might get along together. Tall order but maybe.

In reality, I have little hope for either side. There is a better chance that the Native Americans will take care of there end better than we will or the few that seem to think that they can do as they wish.

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upnorth

Quote:

Here we go again the start of another walleye depleted lake! Are they going to have any regulations or limits on what they can take? I heard they can't use nets but I bet they do anyway!


Anyway you look at it they have a lot more to lose if they Walleye population crashes again. The lake and the walleyes are not a source of recreation for them, it is a source of their livelyhood. I don't think they want to risk the crash of the walleyes any more than you do, they probably have more concerns than you do.

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Scott K

All I know is if they are looking for help to catch some of these fish I would be willing to be hired for fishing and catching some of their fish for them! grin.gif

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sunnyj

Quote:

Why do you assume that "they" will break their own laws immediately. Do you really think it will just be a free frawl with no regs or limit's? Maybe "you" should be a little more forgiving and give those allowed to commercially harvest, the benefit of doubt before judging what "you" think will be done. A little pre-emptive judging is not a good thing. At least try to be a little more politically correct in your posting.


I agree with your post up to your last sentence. Political correctness is WAY over rated. This is america and he can say what he wants and how he wants to say it. You have the choice not to listen.

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brady_d

i'm with you wanderingeyes. where do i sign up? grin.gif

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Milkdud

Sorry....I guess my comments did come across in a negative way. I really am concerned about the fishery and would hate to see it abused once again. I realize that they have the right to harvest fish but we all know what happened years back and I would hate for it to happen again. I am an avid fisherman who practices C&R and knowing how hard everyone has worked to get the walleye population back up it would be a shame to see the fish deleted once again. Just my opinion I guess!

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Big_Cahuna

This ice needs to vamoose. Everyone will be better off once we can get some casts going. The Band will take care of their business and we'll take care of ours. Hopefully we'll all enjoy the sweet taste of walleye or pout for some of you "others"! Keep URL Beautiful. Let's roll with that. See you all at Opener.

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fisherdog19

Political correctness, couth, whatever you want to call it. I too, am allowed to voice my opinion, and you don't have to listen, although no one is listening, we are actually reading. I agree, everyone is entitled but it goes both ways, and sometimes a little diplomacy can go a long ways.

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LOTWSvirgin

ok they may not use nets but look how well the fish bite I do not say they will cause low numbers of walleye to the lake but they very well could in no time at all if they really wanted to they did do it once but I dont say they will do it again but if the market for the fish is high priced what would you do if you were them hhhmmm I bet I know what what some not most would do

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Big_Cahuna

After spell checking your post I do not follow what you are saying. I read the posts to become a little more informed and it sounds like it was a combination of things. We should just be concerned about doing everything we can on the URL side inclusive of picking up garbage, making a difference in lieu of pointing fingers and stirring up the muck. Fish On. Rock on with Moon Dance Jam!

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LOTWSvirgin

I tried to fix it for you so maybe you can understand what I ment I hope I didnt stress your mind to hard trying to figure out my mistakes

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vikinglandman

Wow this one could heat up fast, but here's my two cents--Bottom line is the great state of Minnesota owns just 18 % of said body of water and is entitled to 18 % of the safe harvest quota of fish on this body of water. I'm cool with that. My trouble starts if the state of Minnesota has footed more than 18% of the cost to restock and manage this body of water. If Minnesota did and will pay more than 18% of the cost maybe I could get the DNR to plant 50,000 trees a year on my land of which you'll can cut down 18% of them while I start up my logging company smile.gif

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Kyle Sandberg

Does the band have slot limits like we do on our side of the lake. I sure hope they let the big mammas go for reproduction.

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hawkeye43

Maybe we should sweep before our doors first. we all saw the pic.of the fish piles that were clean and left on the lake. There were far to many cases of it, How and what do you think the red lake band reacts when they see that??? If I were in their shoes, I see it as the white man are not living up to the laws of the state and could be fishing the lake out again. They are just looking for a way to make a living.

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walleye101

KDawg

Yes 18-28 inch protected slot.

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Random guy

Quote:

Wow this one could heat up fast, but here's my two cents


No that is not going to happen because I am growing tired of every two weeks dealing with this topic or some type of "evil reservation" direction they take, if it heats up I will simply lock it or admin will remove it. Now if it stays civil it will remain.

Also take a good look at funding numbers from the stocking effort, then call the pot and inform the pot it is black.

While the sky falls and the great demise is caused by the Red Lake Nation I am going to spend my time seeing what I can do to help slow down or stop poaching and pollution by the non-reservation side of Upper Red lake so the Sportsmen and Sportswomen of the future have a place to go fishing.

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Big_Cahuna

[Note from admin:Please read forum policy before posting again]

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

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