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tunrevir

Survival gear and techniques for the woods

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tunrevir

I thought I'd post this and see what types of things you all carry afield when on a hunt. Not just out the back door of the cabin or just down the street to farmer Johnsons feild but out into the wilderness. Say the Rockies or even the tundra. What items/techniques would you consider to be essential to survive for up to a week in the woods? Could you do it in inclement weather, cold, wind, sleet, snow, rain, a dip in frigid waters? Lets hear what you'd carry and how you'd use it!

Tunrevir~ cool.gif

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jlm

A tarp, dry paper (or wood shavings) and some sort of fire starting device. With that a guy could go a long time! Lots of other stuff helps as well...chime in guys!

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Nate McVey

I have hunted elk in CO for 7 years now and each year my survival pack gets bigger and bigger. Of course I have the usual ie. batteries, waterproof matches, extra knives, rope, etc. But I also carry:

Solar Blanket

Packable North Face Coat

GPS

Compass

Map

MSR backpacking stove

Heat packs

Water purification

Radio

First Aid Kit

Rope

Xtra Socks

Gorp, Cheese and Jerky

Instant Coffee

Those things are in my daily hunt pack and I know it seems like a lot, but with today's backpacks it is easy to put all these things in seperate compartments and still have room to pack out a quarter. I'm sure I will think of some more things that are probably in there, but that is a start.

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BobT

I hunt in northern Minnesota. I make it a point to be sure and have a knife, fire starter, compass, gps, flashlight, and extra ammo.

But primarily I make it a point to be aware of my surroundings. I think in many situations when a person becomes disoriented or turned around in a forest, it is when they have been daydreaming and not really paying attention to the surrounding terrain.

Bob

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HuntFishDude

shiner2367, just curious, have you ever weighed your pack? Did you guys forget to list the toliet Paper? grin.gif

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Nate McVey

Quote:

shiner2367, just curious, have you ever weighed your pack? Did you guys forget to list the toliet Paper?
grin.gif


With 120 oz. of water, Red Bull and food it's about 40 lbs. As far as the TP goes, I figured that was a given tongue.gif We typically pack out the front quarters first, unload that packs and go back for the hind quarters and the rest of the animal. I know it seems like a lot of stuff to carry, but I have been turned around before when the weather changed and I was glad to have that stuff.

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tunrevir

My day pack has similar items as yours Shiner when I am elk hunting. Topomaps are nice to have along as well, kinda clues you into some of the beches and saddles like the contour lines on the lakemaster chip! I also carry a cheap packable set of rainwear that I can put on over my hunting clothes if need be for extra warmth and water/windproofing, the packable kind packs down to about 5"x6"x5" Nice to have in a pinch! Oh yeah and about 10' of duct tape, parachute cord rather then rope, magnesium fire starter, butane lighter and waterproof matches, cotton balls soaked with vaseline and a few other items.

Tunrevir~

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woodview

an odd one here - diapers (about the best 'large wound' bandaid you're going to find). On that line baby wipes.

triple anti-biotic cream. good stuff especially when you're not always able to wash smaller cuts and scratches.

Burn cream.

depending on time of year a snake bite kit is a must (at least after you've had a couple close encounters - not usually needed during hunting season if you're at any elevation and I don't ever plan on using it but... since I've just jinxed myself)

another odd one - film container. I smoke (I know I know) I don't think that sealing the butte in one is going to stop the scent but why add more than needed and more importantly it keeps them where you can throw them away and not litter. they're just good little containers.

As shiner said the h20 pills. They're needed in many places in the rockies. Forget the name of the illness but the water can be dangerous. Don't just assume that pretty little spring bubbling up from the ground is good - think the illness is cattle related but will bubble the brain and not in a good way. could ask in the western state forumns I'm sure they'd probably be able to tell you about it pretty quick. Boiling the h20 plus the pills is probably the way to go.

Oh, cell phone - hypocritical of me since I don't carry one but we personally go up a little 'goat' track and getting to a hospital would take around an hour just to get to the bottom of the mountain. Plus every few years a big one hits (storm) and people have had to get pulled off. Would stink leaving your gear till the spring but much worse to get stuck up there.

Totally unrelated to the conversation but Wyomings online application is absolutely great. Took me about 2 minutes from start to finish and I'm done. Talking about accomodating someone who's going to put stuff off till the last second. Now, if they'd just reverse their decision to go to preferrence points!

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Duck Matt

Mine is the following double packed in two-1 gallon zip lock bags (great emergency water canteens) and then sealed with a vacum packer two boxes waterproof matches, small can sterno, first aid kit, folding knife, compass, small steel mirror, space blacket sleeping bag, 100 feet parachute cord, film canister with fishing line, sinkers and hooks, whistle. It is about 12 inches by 7 inches by 3 inches and completely waterproof and floats. I have never needed it but it goes with me on all my hunting trips.

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Nate McVey

Thanks for mentioning the Sterno Duck Matt. One scoop of the gel and you could light anything wet in just a few seconds. It also gives of great heat and lasts a couple of hours.

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iffwalleyes

Great tips guys keep them coming. I have several of these things with me but now I have some more ideas to add. I know I will have these before I make a journey out west again.

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iffwalleyes

I am bumping this back to the top. I am getting gear ready for a Sept elk hunt to Mt. Shiner and others have some great things on there list can you think of anything else that might be a really good idea to have. I think all of what Shiner had will be in my pack plus the sterno another great idea.

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Ufatz

A cell phone! Jeeeez you guys, I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned before. grin.gif

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iffwalleyes

Quote:

Oh, cell phone - hypocritical of me since I don't carry one but we personally go up a little 'goat' track and getting to a hospital would take around an hour just to get to the bottom of the mountain. Plus every few years a big one hits (storm) and people have had to get pulled off. Would stink leaving your gear till the spring but much worse to get stuck up there.


It was grin.gif but I don't know that there will be too many cell towners in the mountains maybe.

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Nate McVey

iff, you're going to want some bear spray. I spent a year in Big Sky, MT and I had a hard time taking out my trash without mine.

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icehousebob

I've made my own fire starting kits that work well. I take dryer lint and old, weathered rope, chopped into one inch lengths, and put them mixed together into the twelve sections of the bottom part of a cardboard egg carton. Then fill each one with melted wax. Old candle stubs, parafin, whatever is handy. Each section makes one waterproof firestarter. The chopped rope works like a bunch of small candle wicks and will burn long enough to start damp tinder. Carry a few sections and a Bic disposable lighter in a ziplock bag.

A friendly campfire makes any situation seem less critical. And the time and effort of building a fire calms people down and helps avoid panic and gives you time to think.

Another useful item is a couple of large trash bags. They can be used as an emergency raincoat or cut into a waterproof groundcover or tent. They will break the wind, and if you can get the bright orange ones, they make good emergency markers. They don't weigh much and take up little room in a pack if they are wrapped with duct tape. The tape can also be handy in an emegency for making a shelter or bandaging wounds.

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Kostoglotov

I’d start with the “Pocket Survival Pak” – It’s an excellent starter kit for $25-30, that doesn’t take up much space.

Whistle

For fire starting – Vaseline “soaked” cottonballs work well. I’ll store them in a 35MM film container. 2 means of firestarting are a must – Bic lighters, good wind/waterproof, fire steel, etc.

Flashlight & Headlamp

Knife & Multi-tool

550 (Para) cord

One other thing is practice with the tools you’re taking – try out your means of firestarting, how you’re going to build a shelter, etc. Doing this stuff for the first time when you are lost, injured, etc isn’t the time to learn

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Wanderer
      Thanks for the feedback.   We have the time from hookset to release pretty short I think.  I read earlier this spring the average fight these days lasts 90 seconds or less.  I’ll admit I was amazed to hear that but after a half dozen muskies that have come to net this year, that’s no bull.  We usually have em netted on the first pass by the boat.  My 48 inch net allows one to do all the handling in the water while the other gets the bump board laid out and phone ready for a pic. A quick measure and quick pics and back in the water they go. Thats about as much as we can do.  70 degrees is lower than I expected to hear.  We were seeing those temps on opening weekend in Ontario.  We didn’t like seeing 80 last Friday on Leech.
    • delcecchi
      What do you think of the "cut the hooks" method of dealing with Muskies?   Small bolt cutters to make the process fast.   Just wondering.  
    • guideman
      Typically temps over 70 degrees are considered dangerous for handling Muskies. The length of the fight and the time you take handling the fish will make a difference. That is one of the reasons we use heavy line and big rods, you don't want to battle the fish to the death. Skip photos on smaller fish and remove the hooks with the fish in the net, in the water, not on the bottom of the boat. "Ace"   "It's just fishing man"  
    • Tom Sawyer
      Sylvia would have been my 1st choice, until it recently was discovered to have Stary Stonewart. Pretty devastating invasive. I'd bet Clearwater holds a state record large mouth bass. It also has strong walleye year classes.
    • Wanderer
      I was able to get back out on Leech last Friday the 13th.  Had to take a day off work to get some fishin’ in! This time was strictly for muskies but bass and pike showed themselves anyway. 🙂  The morning waves were still rolling from either the night or Thursday and the lake was rougher  than expected at 6 am.  The forecast said 0-5 and eventually the wind did calm from the northwest, switch, and then proceed from the southwest.  The effect for us was basically almost a 180 degree switch while we were out there and we didn’t see any fish of any size after that.  I think the switch was complete by roughly 1 pm. The other thing that raised our eyebrows was the surface water temps.  We started seeing high 76’s right away on the main lake but climbed pretty quickly to 78-79 mid day and was topping out at 81 by the afternoon/evening.  This made us really want to focus on deeper weeds but weren’t having much luck locating them.  We just weren’t in the right part of the lake.  But that’s how you learn - by doing. Total muskie count for the day = 2; 1 follow (mid 40 class) and one boated (41.5).  The day went SUPER fast for 10 hours of fishing.  Black bucktails raised the two for us.  I had the follow, my partner caught the fish. The temps had us concerned about the fish but my monster 48 inch net enables us to keep the fish completely in the water until it’s time for a quick measure and pic. Still trying to come to grips on what’s too warm for fishing muskies.  This one was on the line for no more than 2 minutes, including the net time before the hooks were out.  Maybe another minute to get the phone and board out and glove on for grabbing it up.  Less than 1 minute to measure and photo, then back in the drink for an easy resuscitation.  
    • Jeff Thill
      Looking for walleye  and bass fishing mostly.   I did hear good things about Clearwater Lake.   My wife has been looking at houses and her focus landed on West Sylvia.  She could care less about the fishing. Have any of you heard good or bad things about Sylvia Lake?    
    • FishinCT
      I looked up the Mille lacs hooking mortality study on walleyes and it started to dramatically increase around 65 degrees. About 5% mortality at 65 degrees but about 25% at 75 degrees. I have to imagine the numbers are higher for muskies given an extended fight with a large fish, having to take more care to not get cut up or hooked yourself while unhooking the fish, temptation to take lots of pictures, etc.  Here's the study if you're interested http://mnmuskie.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Reeves-and-Bruesewitz-2007_factors-influencing-hooking-mortality-of-walleyes-Mille-Lacs.pdf
    • DLD24
      Went out the last couple days on Mille lacs, we had no problem finding fish, but the big fish eluded us... We got all sorts of year classes from 11" eyes on up to 24", which is a good sign... That big storm they got must have dirtied the water up, all the fish we found were on the top edge of the flats no matter how bright it was... Rigging leeches and crawlers were the best until we got some waves then the jigging rap was taking all the fish. The fish were stacked up on points of flats and narrow ridges on the flats... We tried pulling lead for a little while, but I've never done it so I had zero confidence in it haha. 
    • james_walleye
      DLD I'll keep rigging as long is I can keep catching good fish but entering into August I'll start to pull leadcore more.
    • Wanderer
      Ace, honest question here with no intent to debate, just learning more about muskies. What surface temps do you consider to be too warm for handling muskies?