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Barony

Repairables

Question

Barony

I'm in the market for a new truck and am entertaing the idea of looking at a repairable. I guess that when I look at new truck prices, I get a bit of sticker shock. Upon the advice of a bodyman, I have been looking at vehicles at Southside Auto and waiting for something to catch my eye. I'm still not sure if I want to get into this of if I'm better buying one off the lot.

My question is this: Are repairables a good way to go or should they be avoided?

I see a lot of vehicles that have low mileage for a reasonable price minus the body work and parts.

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anyfishwilldo

With all the electronics in new vehicles, you cant be sure if a wire was nicked, sensors out of whack, etc. Repairables are not the good deal they used to be. I've personally seen more problems than their worth, and it can end up costing you more in the long run.

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jigging-matt

I had a repairable. Had the truck for almost 5 years. While I liked the truck and only had a couple of problems with the truck, I would recomend not getting one. One of the worst things was trying to resell the truck when I was ready for a new one. Put it on a local for sale site and had over 350 hits on the truck (was a very nice very clean truck.) Lots of interest but no one wanted the salvage title, and those that did couldn't get their bank to finance it. I personally will never get a salvage title again. smirk.gif

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New Yankee

Barony,

I think the only way one comes out ahead on these is if you have the shop and know how to put them back together your self. There may be some salvaged trucks with minor damage (2-5K lets say) that is primarily sheet metal and parts replacement, but those sell for a premium just for that reason.

The harder hits with frame/cowl/hinge pillar/cab damage that will take a frame machine and body pulls to correct seem to be where the 'good buys' are found, and are so only if you can repair them with reduced (say I own the shop and my techs work on the truck as fill in when they are slow) or no labor charges, etc. When repaired these sell for a small discount, based on the quality of the repair and the title - clean vs salvage or rebuilt - can vary from State to State regarding when a salvage title needs to be issued, who has that duty, and what duty the seller has to disclose same. I'm not sure it'll pay off for you in the long run unless the repairs are solid and you intend to run the wheels off of the truck. What seems cheap may in fact be that way - if you have an uncle in the business, you might have a shot.

My two...

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icechipper

Shoot me an email, I might be able to save you some $$$$.

bryankra at gmail.com

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Sandmannd

I bought a 2000 Durango in 2002 and it's running great. Friends of mine own a shop in ND and do these. It listed at the bank for 22k at the time and I got it for 16k. I bought a warrenty at for it with 100,000 miles or six years. Haven't had anything major on it go wrong. I know it might be hard to resell, but it's paid for now and I'm keeping it cause I only use it to pull my boat or when snow actually comes.

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Valv

ALL my trucks were salvaged, the savings are HUGE, I just got back from Seattle WA where I bought a Dodge Cummins 2500 which cost me 1/3rd of book value, and I drove it all the way here...

If you know what you are doing and what to look for you will save a fortune, I didn't know about this or I would have sold you my Chevy 3500 crew cab I just replaced.... grin.gif

Salvage title will scare some people, look for an easy fixerupper, stay away from bent frames and rolled overs, it cost too much to fix.

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LwnmwnMan2

We tried to buy one for my mother in law, who drives 3 miles to work and home. She's put 20k miles on in 3 years.

Anyways, insurance guy said no way, the insurance will cost more than you're saving.

Might want to check with your guy before you go this route.

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Valv

I have all my vehicled insured (including commercial policies) and never had a problem, in fact I bought one (Toyota Rav4) 2 days before last summer hail, and got it toaled again while at the tire shop. Insurance paid the claim with no problem.

There are some vehicles that are totaled by insurance but still have clear title, they will retain more value.

LwnmwnMan2 you might want to check again with your guy, if he says no again I would shop around for another company

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LwnmwnMan2

Eh, it's no big deal to me. The guy's one of those that shops 15-20 different companies for me, so I know I'm getting a good deal.

Anyways, I wasn't too fired up to get a repairable, so that made my decision easy.

I guess if the original poster is looking hard at getting one, that he'd probably want to get a VIN# and run it past his insurance guy first.

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